Posts Tagged ‘Cartoonist’

Tillie the Toiler – Fashion Parade

May 1, 2012

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Nebraska State Journal – Jan 15, 1939

A little background from Danger Trail – A Reader’s Guide to the Dell Four Color Comic Series:

It was the early 1920s and Russ began to put together a strip featuring the popular flapper character. Originally called Rose of the Office the title was changed to Tillie the Toiler and submitted to King Features which bought the strip. Tillie first appeared as a Sunday on January 3, 1921 with the daily beginning on October 10 1922.

The strip followed the social whirl and office activities of Tillie Jones, an attractive brunette and her co-workers and friends. Tillie was variously employed as a secretary, stenographer and part-time model in the fashion salon owned by J.P. Simpkins. Much of the story revolved around the relationship between Tillie and co-worker Clarence ‘Mac’ MacDougall. Mac was a diminutive, jealous and combative suitor. Drawn with a bulb nose and bad haircut Mac was frequently in Tillie’s company and often the object of her affection, nevertheless she was quite fickle and would drop him as soon as a handsome beau appeared on the scene. And they frequently did.

Read more at the link above.

This first “Tillie” paper doll comes with a gown, evening wrap ………. and beach hat.

Albuquerque Journal – Sep 25, 1932

Here, “Tillie” has the same outfits, but they are colored in.

Raleigh Register – Sep 25, 1932

Bathing suit (on the doll,) dress and hat, and a coat are included in this Fashion Parade.

Raleigh Register – Jan 22, 1932

By 1934, all outfits are designed by a single person, per newspaper entry, unlike the earlier ones we each piece designed by a different person.

These sexy ensembles were created by Doris Mae Birch, from Illinois.

Lincoln Star – May 27, 1934

June Miller, from California, designed a riding habit for day, and lovely dress for the evening.

San Antonio Light – Jan 20, 1935

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Stay tuned for more “Tillie the Toiler” – later this week.

Opposed to Cartoons

October 21, 2010

This 1898 cartoon reminded me of the “Everybody Draw Mohammed Day” earlier this year. As stated in the caption, Homer Davenport was a prominent cartoonist.  I wonder if he would have drawn Mohammed:

 

Homer Davenport

From Wikipedia:

Homer Calvin Davenport (March 8, 1867 – May 2, 1912) was a political cartoonist  from the United States. He was known for his satirical drawings and support of Progressive Era politics. A native Oregonian, he would work for several West Coast newspapers before going to work for William Randolph Hearst and the New York Evening Journal. He also was one of the first American breeders of Arabian horses.

 

Also from Wiki:

Haleb, the “Pride of the Desert,” imported to America by Davenport in 1906.

Both images from Wiki entry for Homer Davenport as well.

More on the political cartoons and anti-cartoon bill HERE.