Posts Tagged ‘Cigarettes’

Smoke Out the Cholera

October 3, 2012

Smokers have now a good excuse for using the weed. Doctor Wenck, professor of the Imperial Institute of Berlin, has made the discovery that smokers are relatively immune to certain epidemic diseases, especially cholera. He claims that tobacco smoke rapidly kills the cholera germs.

Can’t somebody help the whiskey guzzler out in similar manner?

Chicago Livestock World (Chicago, Illinois) Feb 26, 1913

College Presidents and Camput Cut-Ups

August 29, 2012

 

Song of the Young Idea.

“The world has never known the turning loose of such an army of hard-drinking, cigaret-puffing, licentious amazons as walk our streets and invade our campuses today.” — President of Roanoke College.

*     *     *

They screech at us and preach at us and call us nasty names;
They flay us and they’d slay us, were they able;
For Jurgen they would substitute the writings of King James;
They’d have us banish gin and things from table!

Sing Hey!
Sing Whee!
Sing They!
Sing Me!

I’ll sing it as I want to, bless me;
Let any one who will suppress me;

Pajamas on an Amazon are pretty things to see;
It chances that the dance is rather sexy;
Admitting we like petting and put whisky in our tea —
Well — what is all of that to Prexy?

Sing Ho!
Sing Hum!
Sing Woe!
Sing Rum!

Let any one who wants to doubt it,
We’re having lots of fun about it!

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Jan 19, 1924

If I Know What I Mean
by Elsie Janis

COLLEGE PRESIDENTS AND CAMPUS CUT-UPS.

PRESIDENT SMITH, of Roanoke college, grabbed off a lot of front-page space for himself and his institution the other day by speaking his mind freely and fiercely about the modern girl. Of course, it pays to advertise and his obviously moral views will attract the attention of some puritanical parents.

“That’s exactly the college for dear daughter!” they exclaim.

It will also interest a number of daughters.

“Nothing stirring, mates! I don’t park my brain and brawn at any Roanoke — so long as that old bird roosts in the lookout nest.” That’s their verdict.

Of course, it would suggest that a man old enough to be president of a college might not know quite all there is to know about the modern girl, but  being just an uneducated female who never went to college, I feel free to say what I want to about college professors. Personally, I think it must be quite hard enough trying to pass exams without having the old dears counting how many cigarettes you smoke a day.

*   *   *

PRESIDENT SMITH said “Never has there been such an army of hard drinking, cigarette puffing amazons as invade the college campus today.” Them was harsh words, Prexy. I don’t know yet whether he meant the Amazon river, on account of their wetness, or whether he means the kind that use to curry spears.

At least the modern girl doesn’t need a spear — she’s got a sense of humor. She needs it if she reads the newspapers. I wish they would stop giving her so much space. She naturally feels she has to make good by appearing bad. And how devout educators like the President must devour the dailies!

He says the girls have flasks on their hips. Now that shows how near he has been to the abandoned creatures! With these new straight up-and-down “cuss as you enter” dresses, that have a hole at the top for the head and one below for the dance-a-meters, you not alone can’t have a flask on the hip, but you can’t even have the hip, and look smart.

*   *   *

JUST where these campus cut-ups carry their liquor I don’t know, but that most of them carry it well, I’m sure. Do they puff cigarettes? Well, if they do, he might give them medals, for that means that they do very little real smoking. If they inhale, that goes a bit further into the subject and a lot further into the lungs. If the girls take one last drag before entering the classroom and then exhale, the smoke at the end of a lecture on Eugenics, he might complain.

I really think that every girl has enough criticism in the home without paying tuition fees for more of it, and broadcasted at that. There is no doubt about modern young women being free thinkers and  spree drinkers — but at least they’re not lonely.

Honestly, I meant to avoid the subject of prohibition. Everything that can be said has been printed and a lot that can’t be printed has been said. I am not for it or against it. Spending half my time in Europe, I can afford to be neutral, though I must admit that while I’m in America I simply can’t afford to be wet.

*   *   *

I’VE just finished a tour and saw a lot of girls and went to many parties. I was not so much impressed by how much these girls drink as I was petrified to see how much the can drink. Gone are the days when the villain hissed: “Curses! One drink and the girl is mine.” Today it’s “Curses! One drink and the girl wants mine.”

Perhaps their heads are so full of ideas that the liquor can’t get up there. Certainly their glass grabbers (right digits) are as tireless as an adding machine and almost as automatic.

Also I have observed that all the vices that the Professor considers disgraceful seem to be quite successful. The girls are certainly more idolized than criticized by the men who know more about loving than is????.

A halo is very satisfactory to the wearer, but the [illegible…..] tell it from Queen Mary’s spring bonnet. The modern young man doesn’t care what’s on her head or in it as long as she is a good dancer, a clean drinker and does not require a lot of rest.

*   *   *

PERHAPS after all, President Smith has hit the nail on the head and driven it in. Perhaps it’s up to the men to save the women and he just started the movement. For years women have been saving men from other women — by which I mean even going to the lengths of marrying them to do it.

Now it’s obviously up to the men to follow the President’s lead if not his creed, and start soul saving on broad lines — not too broad, of course. Since the women insist on thrusting equal rights on the men (which goodness knows they never had before), there is surely nothing to stop the ardent young swain from reversing the tables (or upsetting them according to time, place and intentions), and pulling the time-worn phrase (1924 model), “Darling, I adore you. Do you care enough for me to give up your liquor?”

*   *   *

FRANKLY, I’d love to be saved. But as I never went to college, I couldn’t hope to be classed with President Smith’s Modern Mesalinas. There was a time when actresses had a chance to get on the front page on account of the number of husbands they divorced, but now with public interest all centered around College Cut-ups and the number of cigarettes they consume, we actresses might as well bow low and admit that we are just a lot of tame tabbies trying to get along.

I resign, reluctantly. I am too far behind the modern flapper to catch up with her. Even so, I never could stick with her until 6 a.m. and then meet her in the park at 9:30 on a horse. If I stay up until 3, I don’t’ want to speak even to my mother before noon. And as for riding a horse, I wouldn’t even know how to start a conversation with one at 9:30 in the morning.

However, I am not too far behind the flapper to see and admire her. Yes, and defend her, anytime anybody of another generation starts tearing her to bits as if she were a treaty. I see her shortcomings, but I believe that they, like her short hair will grow out  in time.

In the meantime, I suggest that some college girl be given a front page to tell what she thinks of the modern college president who rushes into print about her.

The Washington Post (Washington, D.C.) Feb 10, 1924

A Product of Southern Cultivation

March 29, 2012

The Atlanta Constitution – Apr 9, 1910

American Tobacco Company (Wiki link)

American Tobacco – Downtown Durham – History

The Washington Post – Apr 6, 1910

Knowledge.
From the Philadelphia Press.

Johnny — Smokin’ cigarettes is dead sure to hurt yer.

Jimmy — G’on! where did yer git dat idee?

Johnny — From Pop.

Jimmy — Aw! he wuz jist stringin’ yer.

Johnny — No, he wuzn’t stringing me; he wuz strappin’ me. Dat’s how I know it hurts.

The Washington Post (Washington, D.C.) Aug 1, 1908

The Washington Post – Apr 30, 1910

Strange Smoking Disorder Reported

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A disorder which appeared in four patients after they stopped smoking cigarettes vanished dramatically when they took up the habit again, says a medical journal.

These strange cases were reported by Dr. Ralph Bookman, of Beverly Hills, in an article in California Medicine, official journal of the California Medical Association.

The disorder was canker sores in the mouth and on the tongue. They developed a few days after smoking was stopped.

Abilene Reporter News (Abilene, Texas) Oct 17, 1960

Galveston Daily News – Oct 7, 1910

“Maybe I was wicked to do it, but I feel a lot easier in my mind how that I know how a cigarette tastes.”

Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin) Jun 24, 1925

Galveston Daily News – Oct 21, 1910

“I pledged too much for missions, but I had took a puff at a cigarette Pa’s nephew left yesterday just to see what it was like an’ my conscience was hurtin’.”

Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin) Jun 26, 1926Galveston Daily News – Nov 15, 1910

Galveston Daily News – Nov 15, 1910

“My boy John used to argue in favor of women smokin’ cigarettes, but I ain’t heard a cheep out of him since I lit one last winter to try him out.”

Suburanite Economist (Chicago, Illinois) Aug 14, 1928

Galveston Daily News – Mar 14, 1911

“A MAN with whiskers ain’t got no business smokin’ cigarettes. Pa tried smokin’ a few the winter before he shaved clean, an’ I was forever smellin’ somethin’ burnin’.”

Suburbanite Economist (Chicago, Illinois) Sep 11, 1928

Reno Evening Gazette – Mar 15, 1911

Two things that keep Jane’s teen age daughter from eatin’ enough are smokin’ cigarettes and the knowledge that she has a cute little figure.

Traverse City Record Eagle (Traverse City, Michigan) Sep 18, 1962

The Atlanta Constitution – Mar 29, 1911

Jim Harkins has taken to readin’ theatrical magazines. He’ll be smokin’ cigarettes next.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Aug 22, 1913

Most o’ th’ daubed-up girls I see sittin’ around with ther knees crossed smokin’ cigarettes must be gettin’ by on ther personality, if they git by at all. I remember when it used t’ take ten or twelve years o’ good, hard consistent boozin’ t’ kill a feller.

Coshocton Tribune (Coshocton, Ohio) Oct 18, 1926

Nevada State Journal – Apr 11, 1911

ZINGG SOLD CIGARETTES.
Grass Valley, Cal., April 1, 1906.

Editor OAKLAND TRIBUNE: Sir — I used ter resyde in Oakland, but after readin’ the sermons and newspaper akkounts of the wiked doins uv yure peple I feel thankful thet I am now residin’ in a moar moral kommunity.

It ‘pears tu me thet Berkly and Alameder are even wuss hotbeds of krime then Oakland.

From the time thet Deacon Logan set an example, which hes been follered by such a numerous band of amorous kohorts, Sally Jane an’ me heve been almost afraid to venture neer yure plase.

Our peeple are strong on chewin’ terbaccer an’ smokin’ pipes, but it is an unritten law here that if a feller is caught sellin’ or smokin’ cigarettes, ‘specially if he blos the smoke threw his nose, that the Vigilance Kommittee shall take the kriminal in hand.

My darter Sally has writ the followin’ feelin’ pome wich is inclosed. Yours till deth,

HAYSEED SMITH.

The town of Alameda, on San Francisco bay,
Lay sleeping in the sunshine of a balmy winter’s day;
The merry wavelets rippled along the tide canal,
And the live oaks nodded to the breeze upon the Encinal.

But woe to Alameda, disaster, shame and crime
Were to stain its fair escutcheon, e’en to the end of time,
And fill each dweller’s bosom with the keenest of regrets,
For Macfarlane had discovered that Bill Zingg sold cigarettes.

The mayor and city officials all
Were summoned at once to the City Hall,
The police were ordered to be within call,
Armed, cap-a-pie, with powder and ball;
A resolution was passed expressing regrets
That wicked Bill Zingg had sold cigarettes.

At once the press and pulpit the news disseminates
To every town and city throughout our galaxy of States;
From Bangor east to the Philippines west come expression of regrets
That Bill Zingg of Alameda ‘d sold a pack of cigarettes.

For centuries bold Captain Kidd, freebooter of the main,
Has sustained a reputation which quite equaled that of Cain,
But now he’s way down on the list, his reputation sets
Away among the “has beens” since Zingg sold cigarettes.

Oh, Billy Zingg! Oh, Billy Zingg! Regret e’re yet too late,
The greatest sinner may return, pass through the golden gate.

St. Peter may smile as you pass in, and express to you regrets,
That you’re the only Alamedan there, though you did sell cigarettes.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Apr 3, 1906

Ralph S. Bauer: Reform Mayor of Lynn

January 9, 2012

Lynn, Massachusetts postcard image from Jovike’s photostream on flickr

LYNN
— St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Mayor Bauer of Lynn has spoken. No more shall the woman smoker be seen in that town on stage or screen. The billboards have also been purged of the contaminating influence exercised by the pictorial cigaret and girl. And the ukase will, we are sure, be heartening to everybody who worries about the frailties and peccadilloes of other folks and thinks something ought to be done about it.

Obviously, the Mayor of Lynn is every inch a wowser; Lynn itself, once gay and grimy, has come upon the semi-retirement of “the city that was.” Now its elegy may be written, in true wowserian strophe:

Here lies Lynn,
Sans gin, sans sin,
Sans Nicotin.

Decatur Herald (Decatur, Illinois) Oct 24, 1929

MAYOR BAUER’S REFORM.

Mayor Bauer of Lynn gets his name on the front pages of the newspapers again by issuing an ultimatum against bare-legged girls, but he would accomplish more as a reformer if he used a little quiet persuasion with school teachers and pupils.

We have failed to detect a grave menace in the fashion of bare sun-tanned legs. With all due regard to the sensitive nature of the fair sex, it must be said that most feminine legs are too imperfect in form and natural covering to permit of public display without artificial covering of some kind.

The bare-legged fashion will not get very far because most women have too much common sense to display the imperfections which are more conveniently concealed or minimized beneath sheer silk.

Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Oct 1, 1929

“The notions that were bred into being years and years ago are now being assaulted and turned topsy-turvy. Our social conduct is changing. We must admit that. Thirty or 40 years ago, if a flapper appeared on the street in the same costume she wears today, she would have been rushed to jail as fast as the smoke left her heels. Now no one cares about the flapper’s dress except Mayor Bauer of Lynn.

Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Nov 23, 1929

Not yet can they put you in jail for wondering so we wonder what Mayor Bauer of Lynn is going to attempt after he has pulled off that recently announced determination to make the school teachers of his city, men and women alike, cut out tobacco. It might be as well to wait until he has made good on that ruling before thinking up the next play for front page position in the newspapers.

If the Lynn teachers are human beings, the mayor is likely enough going to find it harder to make them quit the smoking habit than it was to give his city a reduced tax rate. It will be more or less like enforcing the Volstead act.

Theoretically, it can be done, and the dry leaders can prove it. Actually, it has not yet been done, and the wet leaders say you can’t prove it can be. Looking at it from a distance, it doesn’t strike us as being any of the Lynn mayor’s business if the school teachers wish to smoke, providing they do it in reason. We shouldn’t say that the women teachers should smoke at any time, and not at all in public. But as for exercising that privilege in their own homes it is hard to see where the mayor has any particular call to get stuffy about it.

As to making the men teachers take the anti-nicotine pledge, he has accepted a real job if the male breed down that way is anything like normal. The joker in the cold deck which Mayor Bauer has picked up appears in the situation as it affects the pupils in the schools.

Mayor Bauer may conceivably make the school teachers as smokeless as he decrees, but we have a natural curiosity to know how he is going to make the boys and girls who go to school quit it. Not that we know whether the Lynn school girls smoke, but many of the boys do, unless down in Lynn boys are no longs boys. For which reason the pupils are going to snicker as they look at their poor hen-pecked teachers who dare not smoke for fear of losing their jobs. And you don’t have to be a slave to nicotine to see the humor of the situation which Lynn’s great reform mayor seeks to bring about.

The Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Sep 8, 1926

Bone Dry or No Football Game

Lynn, Mass., Nov. 26. (AP) — Mayor Ralph S. Bauer saw so much drinking at the Harvard-Yale football game at Cambridge Saturday, he said, that he has ordered the Thanksgiving Day high school contest here to be bone dry or stopped.

Twelve thousand persons at the stadium for the Yale-Harvard contests, he estimated yesterday, were more interested in quart bottles and hip flasks than anything else. Many women “took a pull out of the bottles the same as the men,” the Mayor said, and neither the police nor the faculty interfered.

The Rev. Garfield Morgan, pastor of the Center Congregational Church, according to the Mayor, was approached by some one in a big fur coat who said to him, “you look like an old timer, have a drink.”

“Can this be the same Harvard of which the late President Eliot used to boast?” Mayor Bauer asked. “The factor that made her the dominant educational institution of our land was that she had been building men for nearly 300 years?”

On the Mayor’s order, the police chief will station fifty patrolmen and sergeants on duty Thursday at the Lynn-English classical high game with orders to arrest all persons who drink and to stop the game if drinking becomes serious.

Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York) Nov 26, 1929

Mayor Bauer, of Lynn, addressing a meeting of the Women’s Republican club at  Cambridge, Mass., this week, said there were about 4,000 too many municipal employes in Boston and that he could discharge all of them without one being missed. “All city governments are ‘good fellow’ governments,” the mayor told his audience. “Public officials feel they have got to get jobs for their constituents and they don’t care whether there exists a job or not.”

The Bridgeport Telegram (Bridgeport, Connecticut) Jun 30, 1927

“THE NAKED TRUTH.”

“The Naked Truth” which is now showing at the Park theatre has caused considerable comment and discussion recently in Boston and Lynn, Mass. The Mayor of Boston, refused permission to present the film to Bostonians, and immediately upon taking this stand, Mayor Bauer of Lynn viewed the film and passed on it as a good and proper picture, bearing a message of beneficial value to the community and permitted the Lynn Auditorium to show the film for four weeks to record-breaking crowds. The film is featured by an all-star cast supported by Jack Mulhall and Helene Chadwick. This is the first showing of the film in this vicinity. “The Naked Truth” is to the point and calls a spade a spade.

The Bridgeport Telegram (Bridgeport, Connecticut) Nov 2, 1926

Image from Shorpy

DOGS MAY ROAM

LYNN, Mass., — Dec. 14. — (By The Associated Press.) — By proclamation of Mayor Bauer, dogs are assured the freedom of the streets if they do not make nuisances of themselves nor obstruct traffic like some political aspirants do. The more he sees of men, the more respect the mayor has for dogs. The proclamation was issued after state authorities urged that stray dogs be rounded up and killed because of the spread of rabies.

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Dec 14, 1927

Images of John P. McGloin from the Lynn Museum and Historical Society

Independent baseball will be played on the playgrounds at Lynn this summer with Mayor Fred Manning tossing out the first ball. Former Mayor Bauer stopped the games on the playgrounds when he was in office.

Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jul 12, 1930

Mayor of Lynn

Ralph Sherman Bauer

Image from NOBLE Digital Heritage

The following biographical information (from Descendants of HANS MICHAEL BAUER, (BOWER)) tells of Mayor Bauer “pulling himself up by the bootstraps” and making a life for himself:

Notes for RALPH SHERMAN BOWER:

His father died when he was only seven years old. Even at that extremely early age he became the main support of a family consisting of his mother and three sisters, the youngest a nursing baby. The family then living in Philadelphia and it was there that Ralph S. Bauer began his career in the newspaper business. The result of his first day’s sales as a “newsie” was cents. From that time on, every dollar he has ever had has been made by his own business ability. During the first 15 years of his life, there was no kind of human poverty this family did not face, and through it all, held together as a family and received such education as could be obtained under such circumstances.

When Ralph Bauer, yet in his teens, determined to exchange the environment of Philadelphia for cultured Boston, his [wealth] when he landed amounted to 27 cents. Many were the hours of loneliness that were his, with neither kith nor kin nearer than the PA metropolis. Many were the night he slept on a Boston Common bench with the star-studded blue dome of the heavens above, his only coverlet. Oft were dreams rudely disturbed by the smart blow of a patrolman’s night-stick on the thin soles of his tattered shoes. Always with warm appreciation will remained his memory of one of Boston’s guardians of the peace, who drew from him the tale of his struggles for existence. Never will he forget the warmth of the coat the officer tucked about his lusty body while he promised to rouse him from his slumbers in time to get his share of the profits from the early morning edition of the Herald. True to his word the officer awakened the sleeping lad and provided him with a good hot breakfast. If that man is still alive today Ralph Bauer would like to know his whereabouts, for he has never forgotten his kindness to a little lonely lad in a great city, far from his lived ones. He was graduated from the Boston Latin school and immediately thereafter obtained a position in the mailing department of the Boston Herald.