Posts Tagged ‘Economy’

Welcome to the End

November 7, 2012

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After Four Years….Think Twice, Brother

October 10, 2012

Voter – Depression Grouch

Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) Oct 5, 1932

Barry’s World

September 24, 2012

The National Mood is Clear.

– Weary of Inflation –

– Crippled Dollar –

– Stock Market –

– Re-Runs! –

Daily Inter Lake (Kalispell, Montana) Aug 17, 1973

And Bumps in the Road!

Modern Youth

September 10, 2012

MODERN YOUTH

LITTLE BERTRAM, seven years of age, approached his father somewhat apprehensively.

“Say, pop,” he requested, “will you sign my report card?”

His father took the report card, and his face grew stern. A series of D’s and E’s were all over the card. He looked up.

“Young man,” he asserted angrily, “you have failed in every subject. I see, too, that you are to be left back in your class. Have you any legitimate excuse for all this?”

Little Bertram fidgeted uncomfortably.

“Well,” persisted his father, “answer me!”

The kid shrugged hopelessly.

“I’ve tried to keep my head above water,” he alibied. “But what can one person do against a nationwide recession!”

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Mar 5, 1938

The Dignity of Labor – The Day and the Times

September 3, 2012

Anaconda Standard (Anaconda, Montana) Sep 4, 1910

THE DAY AND THE TIMES.

Never in the history of this holiday has it come in a time so distracted and torn with industrial trouble. Labor day this year finds strikes in every part of the country, with greater upheavals brewing and vastly worse conditions threatened. It is an evil ferment. The world has just emerged from the greatest and most destructive war of all time and of everything the world today stands in need there is not enough. The costs of living here and everywhere are as a consequence at unprecedented levels. Every interference with production, every trammel upon distribution, every obstruction to commerce can have no effect but to give fresh impulse to the ascent of prices.

In this country a widespread strike in the steel and iron industry threatens to inflict practically all industry save agriculture with a paralysis from which everybody will suffer. Farther in the foreground looms the dire possibilities of a general railway strike that once launched can spell but calamity for every interest and every person. No living head in the land can wholly escape some touch of that blight. A fortnight’s tie-up of transportation will see the county stricken to idleness, hunger stalking through  the land and disorder fomenting on every side. This is no picture conjured by idle fancy. The railroads must keep things moving or there can be neither work nor wages, neither food nor fuel, and starving, freezing millions will create a ferment out of which anarchy will not be slow to rise hideously. There can be no temporizing with the question of transportation or no transportation.

Everybody suffers from abnormal conditions. Labor — meaning, that is, the unions — is suffering no more than other classes and varieties of humans who earn what they must have to live and much less than most of them. Striking to advance wages or to impose conditions simply serves to make evil conditions more acute. The need is to find the way to make the cost of living more tolerable and the means by which alone that can be done is to increase production of everything whereof there is a shortage in the world. Drives against profiteers and profiteering may here and there effect some relief, but it will be neither general nor great in degree. There can be no thorough relief in which everybody may share until something like normal conditions are restored and nothing will contribute so much to that consummation as that everybody shall remain at work, do his best and permit on every hand that the best be done.

It is a time for all labor everywhere — organized and unorganized, manual toilers and brain workers, every sort upon whose effort depends in some measure the moving of the essential affairs of the world — to keep a clear head, a stout heart and a spirit of readiness to work together and steadfastly until it has at length worked out the problem of the times. Bolshevism, socialism or any ism, cult or lunacy will not overcome the world’s shortage of necessaries. Only work can do that and the more there are who will stick to the job of producing the sooner will shortage be overcome and conditions reduced to normal. Wild-eyed radicalism will not add a peck of grain nor a pound of beef to the world’s short store. The steadfast industry of all everywhere who are able to produce something needed can pull this old world out of the hole and by no force other can it be done.

Fort Wayne Sentinel (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Sep 1, 1919

This is a Man-Sized Job, Mister!

August 1, 2012

European Recovery Plan

Too Little — Too Late

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Jan 15, 1948

Chickens Everywhere but in the Pot

May 2, 2012

Chickens Coming Home to Roost

Fresno Bee Republican (Fresno, California) Apr 4, 1932

Then and Now:  What Happened to the Chickens?

Fresno Bee Republican (Fresno, California) Jul 5, 1932

Which Chicken Shall I Drive Today?

Fresno Bee Republican (Fresno, California) Jul 7, 1932

The Blight on the Road to Recovery

February 15, 2012

ON THE ROAD TO RECOVERY

Price Fixing and Inflation Schemes

Economic Law of Supply and Demand — How You Gonna Get Around That?

Mansfield News (Mansfield, Ohio) Jan 10, 1933

TO THE VICTORS BELONG THE SPOILS!

Administration’s Economy Pledge – More Victors than Spoils

Mansfield News (Mansfield, Ohio) Jan 20, 1933

BACK TO PROSPERITY

Lagging Business Conditions – Maybe I’ll Get a Ride!

Mansfield News (Mansfield, Ohio) Jan 11, 1933

THE BLIGHT

Government Spending — Tax Relief Hopes

Mansfield News (Mansfield, Ohio) Feb 4, 1933

A New Deal – In Silhouette

December 15, 2011

A NEW DEAL — IN SILHOUETTE

Of course you must have seen them. Either in your own house or in that of your grandparents or in the window of an antique shop or in books about the American Revolution. For a century and a half ago, silhouettes were as common as snapshots are today. Everybody, high and low, rich and poor, had himself silhouetted, and such mighty personages as George Washington and Marie Antoinette and Frederick the Great and Benjamin Franklin were silhouetted until they must have been as sick and tired of the own shadow-pictures as George Gershwin must be of his “Symphony in Blue.

The process was exceedingly simple. Everybody could make silhouettes. All he needed was a willing subject, a white screen, a candle, a piece of black paper and a pair of sharp scissors. The rest depended upon his native or acquired ability to catch the shadow of his victim and reduce it to the right proportions. for all I know, the craze for these fascinating shadow pictures may return tomorrow. For the stage is all set for a return of M. de Silhouette. No, he was not some sort of prehistoric photographer, a vague ancestor of that famous M. de Daguerre, who gave us the daguerreotype and modern photography. M. de Silhouette was a financier of great repute and the New Dealer of the reign of King Louis XV of France.

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This is the way that amiable nobleman turned himself into one of the immortals. For when all is said and done, what a greater fame can a man achieve than to make his name part of the current vernacular?

It was during the middle of the Eighteenth Century, France, having been most thoroughly ruined by the dynastic wars of the Great King Louis (whose royal mansions in Versailles were so recently repaired by the generosity of our own Mr. Rockefeller), was about as bankrupt as any nation can be without ceasing to function altogether.

Even in Versailles, where nobody ever learned or forgot anything, a few of the brighter spirits discovered that 1,000,000,000 times zero still makes zero. Evidently, it was time that something be done and be done right away.

Looking around for a bright young man to swing on the dangerous trapeze of finance, the choice fell upon a certain Etienne de Silhouette, a native of Limoges, a former secretary of the Duke of Orleans and member of the royal commission that had settled the Franco-British difficulties in Acadia in 1749.

Young Etienne had been an industrious student of British financial affairs and had translated a good many English books on finance into French. In short, a sort of brain-trust all by himself.

In March, 1759, he was put at the head of the finances of France with unlimited power to do whatever he pleased, provided he go His Majesty’s kingdom out of its desperate difficulties. This appointment was made at the suggestion of the king’s mistress, Madame de Pompadour. The dear lady was not famous for her morals. But she had a good brain. If she and de Silhouette had been given free rein, they might, between them, have saved France from the Revolution.

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But of course the poor New Dealer could accomplish absolutely nothing unless first of all he tackled the problem of the privileged classes. He did his best. He tried to reduce all pensions of all the hangers-on of the court. He proposed to tax the lands of the nobles. He suggested that everybody spend just about half of what he had done thus far, and that there be an end to the wasteful luxury of a court which benefitted nobody but the Versailles pastry-cooks, the Paris jewelers and the light ladies of both cities.

The idea struck the court as something so unusually funny that all of fashionable society began to do things “a la Silhouette,” which was a polite way for doing them “on the cheap.” Thus far, everybody had had his portrait painted by a regular painter. But now of course they could no longer afford to do so, and they had their pictures cut out of a piece of black paper. They had it done “on the cheap” or “a la Silhouette.”

And when the joke had lasted long enough, they booted poor Etienne de Silhouette out of his high office, and the good old times came back right away, and the New Deal went into discard, and Etienne de Silhouette died as the forgotten man, and Marie Antoinette and her boy and girl friends had a perfectly swell time laughing their pretty heads off over this pedantic bore with his everlasting howls about he coming disasters and calamities.

And then they all went to jail and made lovely little silhouettes of each other’s pretty little necks.

And then they had their pretty little necks cut off by the guillotine.

And that is the story of the New Deal of the year 1749 and of Monsieur Etienne de Silhouette.

Rochester Evening Journal (Rochester, New York) Dec 19, 1934

Meet the Commentator
Hendrik Willem
VAN LOON

Van Loon wrote The Story of Mankind, a wonderful history book geared toward children:

Read online or download a free copy at this google link.

Thriftiness

December 13, 2011

A POEM —

EVERY WORD OF WHICH BEGINS WITH A “T”

THRIFTINESS

THE THRIFTY THAT TEACHETH THE THRIVING TO THRIVE,
TEACH TIMELY TO TRAVERSE, THE THING THAT THOU ‘TRIVE,
TRANSFERRING THY TOILING, TO TIMELINESS TAUGHT,
THIS TEACHETH THEE TEMP’RANCE, TO TEMPER THY THOUGHT.
THAKE TRUSTY, (TO TRUST TO) THAT THINKEST TO THEE,
THAT TRUSTILY THIRFTINESS TROWLETH TO THEE,
THEN TEMPER THY TRAVEIL, TO TARRY THE TIDE:
THIS TEACHETH THEE THRIFTINESS, TWENTY TIMES TRYED.
TAKE THANKFULL THY TALENT, THANK THANKFULLY THOSE
THAT THRIFTILY TEACH THEE THY TIME TO TRANSPOSE
TROTH TWICE TO THEE TEACHED, TEACH TEWENTY TIMES TEN,
THIS TRADE THAT THOU TAKEST, TAKE THRIFT TO THEE THEN.

Thomas Tusser

English Poet — 1557.

The Morning Call (Laurel, Mississippi) Nov 3, 1929