Posts Tagged ‘Eisenhower’

Worried About Americans’ Thinking

November 9, 2012

WASHINGTON WINDOW
By LYLE C. WILSON
United Press International

WASHINGTON (UPI) — President Eisenhower was saying the other day that Americans should reject the theories of Karl Marx. He told a news conference that he was greatly disturbed by the spread in the United States of an idea which dated back to Marx’s Communist teachings of more than 100 years ago.

Specifically, Eisenhower objected to Marx’s doctrine of the class war, the ultimately violent contest for supremacy between what Marx called the proletarians and the bourgeoisie. That may be translated into labor (proletarian and management or capital Bourgeoisie). Eisenhower’s reference to Marxian theory came during a discussion of steel labor contract negotiations.

Karl Marx and a collaborator, Friedrich Engels, made their pitch for the class war for a classless society 111 years ago, in 1848. They then wrote “The Communist Manifesto.” Their work is the basic document of all of the Socialist parties in the world today, including the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

Non-Socialist parties and governments have nibbled at various parts of the Marx-Engels prescription for a classless society, adopting bits and pieces of it. Of the 10 steps toward socialism or communism proposed by Marx and Engels, however, one notably, has been accepted and made grimly effective in even the most capitalist nations, including the United States.

Marx and Engels’ 10 steps to Utopia were these:

Abolish property rights in land and apply all rents to public purposes.

Impose a heavy progressive or graduated income tax.

Abolish all rights of inheritance.

Confiscate property of all emigrants and rebels.

Centralize credit in the hands of the state by means of a national bank with state capital and exclusive monopoly.

Centralize the means of communication and transport in the hands of state.

Extend factories and instruments of productions owned by the state; bring waste lands into cultivation and improve the soil generally with a common plan.

Make all persons equally liable to labor; establish industrial especially in agriculture .. 17 agencies  especially in manufacturing industries; gradually abolish distinction between town and country, by more equitable distribution of population.

Provide free education for all children in public schools; abolish children’s factory labor in its present (1848) form; combine education with industrial production.

“In a sense,” Marx and Engels wrote, “the theory of the Communists may be summed up in a single sentence: abolition of private property!”

That is the Socialist-Communist program which Nikita Khrushchev was saying just a while ago would establish a way of life for the present crop of American grandchildren.

Amarillo Globe-Times (Amarillo, Texas) Jun 22, 1959

“People Count Themselves to Death in This Life”

September 24, 2012

Image from Today in Literature

Superior Sagas

By INEZ ROBB

This country has run plumb out of frontier. But despite the laments of the pessimists, it has not run out of the bold, freewheeling pioneer spirit before which the frontier vanished.

That, says an expert (borrowing from Freud) is the reason we Americans are crazy about westerns; We read ’em by the thousands to sublimate our intense yearning to pack up the covered-wagon and git for the great open spaces.

And that goes for President Eisenhower, too, who is one of the most consecrated devotees of western fiction in the country.
So says Louis L’Amour (his square name), walking encyclopedia of the Old West and author of “Hondo” and other superior sagas of the wild and woolly.

“The American is still a tough hombre, rough and ready, no matter what sociologists say about the debilitating effects of central heating, can openers and air-conditioned autos,” said L’Amour when I cornered him for luncheon the other day.

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Product of West

A product of the Old West and the descendant of pioneers, at least one of whom lost his hair to the Sioux, the author bases this heartening appraisal of his fellow citizens in part on his experience with them in a tank destroyer unit in Europe during World War II.

“It may take a jolt to waken that tough, rough and ready streak in him, but he’s got it, even here in the effete East,” says L’Amour.

Born in North Dakota, this is one western author who spent his childhood playing cowboy and Indians with real cowboys and bona fide Indians. There he began to collect, subconsciously, the extraordinary range of western lore that makes the background of his western as authentic and factual as a history of the period.

“I’ve got no time for this Hopalong Cassidy stuff,” said L’Amour, who looks as big and rough hewn as any of his heroes. Having committed heresy, he went on to say that his hero gets the girl, if any, and doesn’t have to go around kissing horses in the sunset.

Even though the Indians scalped his great-grandfather, the author has affection and respect for the noble Redskin and treats him as a man with problems, mainly the pale face, in his fiction.

Not only is L’Amour recognized as a real long-hair student of the Old West as pertains to the pioneers but as an expert on the American Indian, his life and hard times. The two fields mesh and L’Amour is toying with the idea of writing a dictionary or encyclopedia on both.

Most Americans today, he pointed out, don’t even know such elementary facts as why the pioneer used oxen rather than horses or mules on the trek west, or how much goods and gear a covered wagon held.

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Lot More Tasty

Fully loaded, the wagon would tote 2500 pounds. And nature provided the oxen with large hoofs which didn’t sink into sand or sod as did the dainty hoofs of horses and mules. And, in addition, oxen were a lot more tasty in the stew pot if worse came to worst and an animal had to be killed for food.

L’Amour always intended to be an author, but never of westerns. His first novels were about the East Indies, on which he is also an expert. In fact, this inexhaustible man is a student and expert on a dizzying number of subjects, Indian archeology and the 12th Century, to name two.

He recently signed a contract to do two novels on the 12th Century theme. But in the intermin, he has a number of novels on the fire for Americans who long for a home where the buffalo roam and who, when they settle down with a good book, begin to hum “Don’t Fence Me In.”

Albuquerque Tribune (Alburquerque, New Mexico) Aug 12, 1954

This Writer’s Life Better Than Stories

By HAL DOYLE

NEW YORK (AP) — “People count themselves to death in this life,” said Louis L’Amour, declining to give his age.

With L’Amour, one of America’s  most prolific adventure writers, keeping his age to himself isn’t a matter of vanity. It’s a philosophy.

“It isn’t the number of years you’ve lived that’s important,” he said, “It’s a mistake to measure living in terms of years. It’s how you’ve spent the years that puts real meaning into existence.”

Judged by most standards, L’Amour has had enough experiences to last the ordinary man through several reincarnations.

The average adventure writer is a swivel chair dreamer who would think twice before picking a quarrel with his dentist.  L’Amour not only looks like the adventure heroes he writes about — he probably could whip one of his own heroes in a fight with either fist or gun.

The big 6-foot-1 inch author weighs 200 and is a judo expert as well as an authority on desert or jungle survival. He has been a sailor, a miner, a hobo, a professional boxer — he won 54 bouts, lost 5 — and an antitank combat officer in World War II.

At 15 he left his home in Jamestown, N.D., and joined a circus as the first step in a search for adventure that has carried him to almost every place in the world.

“Even then I knew I wanted to write,” he recalled. “But I figured I could learn more out of school than in it. I felt I had to see life before I could write about it.”

“I had 200 stories rejected before I sold my first one for $10,” he recalled.

His career has now reached the jackpot stage. He has published more than 400 short stories, turned out half a dozen adventure novels, including “Hondo,” made into a movie starring John Wayne, to whom he bears a strong physical resemblance. Recently he sold a magazine serial for $15,000, sat down and wrote another book, “We Shape the Land,” in 55 hours at the typewriter in 5 days.

L’Amour, whose own experiences have proved a fruitful gold mine, has no patience with people who think of adventure as something limited to the glamerous past.

“It isn’t,” he said soberly. “There is more adventure alive in the world today than there ever was, plenty of unexplored places. Adventure is there waiting for any man with the courage to go and find it. But you’ll never discover it by looking at the calendar — and counting yourself to death.”

Abilene Reporter News (Abilene, Texas) Apr 25, 1955

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Proving, once again,  that “going to school” is not the same thing as “receiving an education”:

Anderson Daily Bulletin (Anderson, Indiana) Sep 16, 1954

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Panaman City News (Panama City, Florida) Jul 16, 1969

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One of several Louis L’Amour books made into a movie:

Hammond Times (Hammond, Indiana) Sep 27, 1956

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A real “corker” of a quote:

The Daily Intelligencer (Doylestown, Pennsylvania) Dec 27, 1955

Ike Sees Red – the Registerers… Not So Much

August 24, 2011

Today in History:

In his Summer White House office at Lowry Air Base, Colorado, President Eisenhower signed into law the proposed anti-Red bill which virtually outlaws the Communist party.

The President called it a step in the program to guard the nation.

(NEA Telephoto)

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Aug 25, 1954


COMMIE REGISTERERS BORED.

At the close of the first day in their new jobs, Anita Intellini (left) and Shirley McGowan, both of Washington, D.C., are completely bored.

Their task is to register Communists at the Justice Department under the Communist Control Act signed into law by President Eisenhower.

Not one Commie, not even a Pinkie, came in to register.

The Marion Star (Marion, Ohio) Aug 27, 1954

From Armistice to Veterans’ Day

November 11, 2010

President Eisenhower signing ceremony the change from Armistice to Veterans’ Day

A New Name for November 11

THE ACTION of Congress in changing the designation of November 11 from “Armistice Day” to “Veterans’ Day” has probably heightened the significance of that date as a time to pause in respect and memory of the valiant deeds of our armed forces in wartime.

Throughout America’s history the strength of the nation has had its finest expression in the willingness of our sons and daughters to give of themselves when the need arises. Their service has preserved the freedom which has become synonymous with America and our way of life. It continues to provide hope and leadership for a troubled world.

It is fitting that on this first occasion known as Veterans’ Day we should all pause in our daily activity to pay high tribute to those who have served their country.

The County-side observance being conducted this year by veterans organizations, guided by the Alameda County Veterans’ Day Commission, the Board of Supervisors, and City Councils, seems most appropriate. The members of the Commission should be complimented for their efforts in establishing a new and enlightened interest among both veterans and the general public.

It is to be hoped that this year’s colorful parade and military demonstrations in Oakland will be but the forerunner of observances to be held in other cities of the County in future years.

Daily Review (Hayward, California) Nov 11, 1954

D-Day: Give Us Strength

June 6, 2010

*****

Montgomery in Command of U.S., British and Canadian Invaders

SUPREME HEADQUARTERS, Allied Expeditionary Force, June 6 — (AP) — Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower’s headquarters announced today that Allied troops began landing on the norther coast of France this morning strongly supported by Naval and air forces.

Text of the communique:

Under the command of Gen. Eisenhower Allied Naval forces supported by strong air forces began landing Allied armies this morning on the northern coast of France.

The Germans said the landings extended between Le Have and Cherbourg along the south side of the bay of the Seine and along the northern Normandy coast.

Parachute troops descended in Normandy, Berlin said.

Berlin first announced the landings in a series of flashes that begin about 6:30 a.m. (12:30 a.m. eastern war time).

The Allied communique was read over a Trans-Atlantic hookup direct from General Eisenhower’s headquarters at 3:32 E.W.T., designated “communique No. 1.”

A second announcement by Shaef said that “it is announced that Gen. B.L. Montgomery is in command of the army group carrying out the assault. The army group includes British, Canadian, and U.S. forces.”

Eisenhower Tells Europe Of D-Day

NEW YORK, June 6 — (AP) — The OWI reported today this statement by Gen. Eisenhower was broadcast by allied radios in London:

“People of western Europe! A landing was made this morning on the coast of France by troops of the Allied expeditionary force. This landing is part of the concerted United Nations plan for the liberation of Europe, made in conjunction with your great Russian Allies.

“Although the initial assault may not have been made in your own country, the hour of your liberation is approaching.”

PRESIDENT TO LEAD NATIONAL PRAYER AT 9 P.M.

A community-wide prayer service will be held at the First Baptist church at 9 o’clock this evening. A radio will be installed that the assembly may join with President Roosevelt in prayer for success of the armed forces.

WASHINGTON, June 6 — (UP) — Following is President Roosevelt’s prayer for success of our arms in their task — a prayer in which he asks all to join when he utters it by radio at 9 p.m. CWT tonight:

My fellow Americans”

In this poignant hour, I ask you to join me in prayer:

Almighty God: Our sons, pride of our nation, this day have set upon a mighty endeavor, a struggle to preserve our Republic, our religion, and our civilization, and to set free a suffering humanity.

Lead them straight and true; give strength to their arms, stoutness to their hearts, steadfastness to their faith.

They will need thy blessings. Their road will be long and hard. The enemy is strong. He may hurl back our forces. Success may not come with rushing speed, but we shall return again and again; and we know that by Thy grace, and by the righteousness of our cause, our sons will triumph.

They will be sore tried, by night and by day, without rest — till the victory is won. The darkness will be rent by noise and flame. Men’s souls will be shaken with the violence of war.

These are men lately drawn from the ways of peace. They fight to end conquest. They fight to liberate. They fight to let justice arise, and tolerance and good will among all thy people. They yearn but for the end of battle, for their return to the haven of home.

Some will never return. Embrace these, Father, and receive them, thy heroic servants, into Thy kingdom.

And for us at home — fathers, mothers, children, wives, sisters and brothers of brave men overseas — whose thoughts and prayers are ever with them — help us, Almighty God, to rededicate ourselves in renewed faith in Thee in this hour of Great sacrifice.

Many people have urged that I call the nation into a single day of special prayer. But because the road is long and the desire is great, I ask that our people devote themselves in continuance of prayer. As we rise to each new day, and again when each day is spent, let words of prayer be on our lips, invoking Thy help to our efforts.

Give us strength, too — strength in our daily tasks, to redouble the contributions we make in the physical and material support of our armed forces.

And let our hearts be stout, to wait out the long travail, to bear sorrows that may come, to impart our courage unto our sons wheresoever they may be.

And, O Lord, give us faith. Give us faith in Thee; faith in our sons; faith in each other; faith in our united crusade. Let not the keenness of our spirit ever be dulled. Let not the impacts of temporary events, of temporal matters of but fleeting moment — Let not these deter us in our unconquerable purpose.

With Thy blessing, we shall prevail over the unhold forces of our enemy. Help us to conquer the apostles of greed and racial arrogancies. Lead us to the saving of our country, with our sister nations  into a world unity that will spell a sure peace — a peace invulnerable to the schemings of unworthy men. And a peace that will let all men live in freedom, reaping the just rewards of their honest toil.

Thy will be done, Almighty God.

Amen!

The Abilene Reporter News – Jun 6, 1944