Posts Tagged ‘Great Depression’

Welcome to the End

November 7, 2012

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After Four Years….Think Twice, Brother

October 10, 2012

Voter – Depression Grouch

Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) Oct 5, 1932

“Stand Out of My Sunshine!”

December 12, 2011

A COSTLY BLUNDER

MANY business advantages will accrue to the American people from the Supreme Court decision invalidating the NRA.

In spite of frenzied administration propaganda to the contrary, recent disinterested nonpartisan statistical surveys show how the meddlesome NRA RETARDED RECOVERY IN THE UNITED STATES.

The Brookings Institution and the National Bureau of Economic Research have published their conclusions that the NRA definitely interfered with the revival of production.

Furthermore Colonel Leonard P. Ayers, of Cleveland, has shown that in the two years of the NRA codes American industry has made almost THE WORST RECORD among the nations of the world so far as recovery is concerned.

Colonel Ayres has shown that only France had made a less satisfactory record.

Other principal countries in the same period showed INCREASES in industrial production RUNNING UP TO 41 PER CENT, while under the NRA the United States actually revealed A DECLINE OF 9 PER CENT.

The Cleveland economist makes the subjoined vigorous and true indictment of the futile and disturbing major new deal experiment, from which the country has at length been saved by the Supreme Court.

Image from FDR and the Supreme Court

“The first and safest conclusion is that conditions will probably improve after the necessary readjustments to the changed conditions of conducting business have been worked out. It seems quite improbable that the trend of industrial production in this country can continue to decline during the next two years at the rate at which it has declined during the past two years. The natural forces of recovery are operating vigorously in the rest of the world, and they are bound to have at least some effect here unless we erect too many new barriers that restrain them.”

What a blow to the prestige of self-inflated politicians!

Their record is largely one of hampering, rather than facilitating the revival of prosperity.

Perhaps new dealers need anew the advice which Bentham, the British economist, published more than a century ago.

“The request which agriculture, manufacturers, and commerce present to government,” wrote Bentham, “is modest and reasonable as that which Diogenes made to Alexander: ‘Stand out of my sunshine! We have no need of favor. We require only a secure and open path.”

Rochester Evening Journal (Rochester, New York) Jun 18, 1935

A National Game of Blind Man’s Buff

December 12, 2011

WINSOR M’CAY’S LAST PICTURE
By Arthur Brisbane

It Shows a National Game of “Blind Man’s Buff,” American Business Blindfolded

AS HE WORKED at his pictures, not in isolation but in a room with other artists, where young office boys might watch and study his methods, Winsor McCay would look up occasionally to ask with ingenuous sincerity, whoever might be near him: “There, do you think that is PLAIN enough?”

His desire above all was to make his meaning clear, plain. He succeeded in doing so in this as in so many other pictures.

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A drawing by Winsor McCay calls for little comment, except that which takes form in the brain of him who studies the picture.

Winsor McCay has certainly made this picture “plain.” Business men will not miss its meaning.

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Mr. McCay did not outline this picture in any spirit of criticism or final judgment. He endeavored to show the business intelligence and enterprise that have created this country’s industries, its commerce and prosperity, as they are NOW.

There are various opinions of what we call “American Big Business.” But there cannot be two opinions as to the work that Big Business has done. It has created the factories, the mills, the railroads, the new industrial ideas and methods and [the payrolls] of America. Selfishly, if you like, mistakenly, with unwise methods sometimes, but it has created them.

Business, like a man blindfolded, in the game of “Blind Man’s Buff,” with many little children around him, groping with hands spread out, wondering just where he is and in what direction he is going.

The gnome-like creatures that surround him are all the creation of the New Era, chief among them, little, busy NRA. These little creatures under the direction of college professors, some of whom, perhaps know less about business than those who CREATE the business, have made the rules of this new “Blind Man’s Buff” game that American Business must play, doing the best it can.

The little gnomes have not only written new rules for the game, they have also invented new taxes to pay the expenses of the game, and the big blindfolded individual must simultaneously play the game under the new rules and find the money to pay the new taxes.

It is not an easy game for him, as yet.

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The object of the game, as in old-fashioned “Blind Man’s Buff,” is to seize and identify one of the players, giving that player’s name correctly, without removing the bandage on the eyes, or “cheating” by peeking.

American Business and Industry would have no difficulty in identifying the lady that they are seeking, if once she were firmly held, but at present the blinded giant is walking in the wrong direction, that which he seeks behind him.

Perhaps he will turn soon, seize and hold the handsome lady, and make us all happy, while the little gnomes and their professorial papas dance and sing in a ring.

But that hasn’t happened yet.

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After sketching in pencil, the picture which Mr. Powers later finished in ink, in a style quite different from that of Mr. McCay, the latter commented, according to his custom, on the work in hand:

“You know how foolish a man feels when his eyes are blindfolded. Even when one of your children steps up, puts both hands over your eyes, and says: ‘Guess who?’ you feel that the world has suddenly changed. The world is what we see and, without sight, nothing is real.

“My business is making pictures, and I don’t pretend to judge the New Era, the professors or the new theories. But I do know that many business men feel as if they have been suddenly blindfolded, that they no longer can control their business direction or their own movements.

“Perhaps they were going too fast in the wrong direction, perhaps they need to be blindfolded for a while. I don’t know.

“But I do know as a maker of pictures that it would be difficult for me to get ahead in my line if somebody fastened a handkerchief around my eyes.

“And I know that some of the ablest business men in the United States today feel as I should feel if blindfolded.”

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Many able Americans, trying to comply with all the orders of these little gnomes and at the same time to meet their payrolls, will say “Amen” to Mr. McCay’s words, and agree heartily with the thought expressed in this, his LAST PICTURE.

Hamilton Daily News Journal (Hamilton, Ohio) Aug 18, 1934

Front and Back Yard Poetry

September 13, 2010

OUR OWN FRONT YARD

(Suggested by E.B.D., Muskegon, Mich.)

My old Dutch friend, years without end,
Each morning of his life,
With broom and pan (a cleanly man,
As cleanly as his wife)
His porch has swept, and then has stepped
From porch to walk to gate,
From house to street has kept things neat,
As tidy as his mate.

The world without has dust, no doubt,
Dishonesty, and sin,
But he keeps fair, his walk, his stair,
His little world within.
He cannot change and re-arrange
This world so wrong, so hard,
And yet Old Dutch can do this much —
Keep clean his own front yard.

Perhaps this earth would have more worth,
Be better than it is,
If all of us would follow thus
This simple rule of his.
How much it might help set things right,
How much it all would mean,
If you and I, if low or high,
Would keep our own yards clean.

(Copyright, 1930, by Douglas Malloch)

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Oct 9, 1930

Image from the O.C. History Round-up,  an interesting blog, particularly if you are from Orange County, California.

OUR OWN BACKYARD

Seems to me that ev’rything around the place is glad,
Chickens scratch and robins sing and nothin’ feels so bad,
Seems to me the kittens play and that the old cow moos
Just about the same today as when they got the noos
That copper slumped and silver fell
And Wall Street wasn’t feelin’ well.

Seems that they don’t realize how things have gone to pot;
Still the roosters advertise around the old home lot,
Seems to me the chickens still hunt what they’re huntin’ for,
If worms are fewer in the hill just scratch a little more.
The pup’s as busy as the bird,
But then perhaps they haven’t heard.

Seems to me we’re too inclined to look across the fence,
Usin’ someone else’s mind, not our own common sense.
Seems to me we have our patch when business isn’t big —
That’s the place we ought to scratch, the ground we ought to dig.
The way to help when times are hard
Is scratchin’ in our own back yard.

(Copyright, 1930, by Douglas Malloch)

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Oct 30, 1930