Posts Tagged ‘Holidays’

Empty Chair Day

September 3, 2012

Karl Marx and the Empty Chair

Image from iOwnTheWorld

The Dignity of Labor – The Day and the Times

September 3, 2012

Anaconda Standard (Anaconda, Montana) Sep 4, 1910

THE DAY AND THE TIMES.

Never in the history of this holiday has it come in a time so distracted and torn with industrial trouble. Labor day this year finds strikes in every part of the country, with greater upheavals brewing and vastly worse conditions threatened. It is an evil ferment. The world has just emerged from the greatest and most destructive war of all time and of everything the world today stands in need there is not enough. The costs of living here and everywhere are as a consequence at unprecedented levels. Every interference with production, every trammel upon distribution, every obstruction to commerce can have no effect but to give fresh impulse to the ascent of prices.

In this country a widespread strike in the steel and iron industry threatens to inflict practically all industry save agriculture with a paralysis from which everybody will suffer. Farther in the foreground looms the dire possibilities of a general railway strike that once launched can spell but calamity for every interest and every person. No living head in the land can wholly escape some touch of that blight. A fortnight’s tie-up of transportation will see the county stricken to idleness, hunger stalking through  the land and disorder fomenting on every side. This is no picture conjured by idle fancy. The railroads must keep things moving or there can be neither work nor wages, neither food nor fuel, and starving, freezing millions will create a ferment out of which anarchy will not be slow to rise hideously. There can be no temporizing with the question of transportation or no transportation.

Everybody suffers from abnormal conditions. Labor — meaning, that is, the unions — is suffering no more than other classes and varieties of humans who earn what they must have to live and much less than most of them. Striking to advance wages or to impose conditions simply serves to make evil conditions more acute. The need is to find the way to make the cost of living more tolerable and the means by which alone that can be done is to increase production of everything whereof there is a shortage in the world. Drives against profiteers and profiteering may here and there effect some relief, but it will be neither general nor great in degree. There can be no thorough relief in which everybody may share until something like normal conditions are restored and nothing will contribute so much to that consummation as that everybody shall remain at work, do his best and permit on every hand that the best be done.

It is a time for all labor everywhere — organized and unorganized, manual toilers and brain workers, every sort upon whose effort depends in some measure the moving of the essential affairs of the world — to keep a clear head, a stout heart and a spirit of readiness to work together and steadfastly until it has at length worked out the problem of the times. Bolshevism, socialism or any ism, cult or lunacy will not overcome the world’s shortage of necessaries. Only work can do that and the more there are who will stick to the job of producing the sooner will shortage be overcome and conditions reduced to normal. Wild-eyed radicalism will not add a peck of grain nor a pound of beef to the world’s short store. The steadfast industry of all everywhere who are able to produce something needed can pull this old world out of the hole and by no force other can it be done.

Fort Wayne Sentinel (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Sep 1, 1919

Labor Talk: Roosevelt Warns Against Despotism, Envy and Mob Violence

September 2, 2012

PRESIDENT TALKS TO LABOR.

Warns His Hearers Against Despotism, Envy and Mob Violence.

A community of interest, with caste forgotten and personal worth the sole basis of class distinction, with capitalist and wage worker helping themselves by aiding each other and both content to abide by the laws, was the doctrine preached at Syracuse Monday by President Roosevelt as the prime requisite for a prosperous and permanent national life.

As a labor day creed, its acceptance was urged by a warning against a tendency toward despotism, the envy of demagogues and their bent toward mob violence being classed as a danger to the laborer far more malign than the arrogance of the affluent.

“We must act upon the motto of all for each and each for all,” was the keynote of the address, which denounced the leaders who incite class antagonism, whether the labor agitator who shouts for plunder or the unscrupulous man of wealth who seeks to subvert the laws in order to oppress.

“We must see that each man is given a square deal, because he is entitled to no more and should receive no less,” ran the final aphorism with which President Roosevelt drove home his plea for the abolition of industrial castes.

The prosperity of the farmer and the wage worker is the index of the nation’s welfare, argued the President, and the interests of every business, trade and profession are so identical that they “tend to go up or down together.” To maintain a healthy government individuals instead of classes must be considered, and the permanency of a spirit that will conserve the rights of others as well as defend one’s own.

In the decline of defunct republics of the medieval age the President traced examples of the pernicious effect of class legislation, and gave point to his warning against demagogy by the conclusion that the result was equally fatal no matter whether the mob or the oligarchy conquered.

To unite the contending classes, the President urged that the wage worker should display sanity and a desire to do justice to others and that the capitalist should welcome and aid all legislative efforts to settle present difficulties. The currency system was cited as an example of legislation that is good because not classlike.

With his argument for the abolition of classes ended, the President launched into a characteristic eulogy of the benefits of hard work, which he styled the “best prize life has to offer.” The idler was dismissed with the quotation, “After all the  saddest thing that can happen to a man is to carry no burdens.” Breadwinners and homemakers, fathers and mothers of families, were given their tribute, the President declaring that there is a place for each among the honored benefactors of the nation.

Following are paragraphs from the President’s Labor Day address:

There is no worse enemy to the wage worker than the man who condones mob violence in any form or who preaches class hatred.

If alive to their true interests, rich and poor alike will set their faces like flint against the spirit which seeks personal advantage by overriding the laws, without regard to whether the spirit shows itself in the form of bodily violence by one set of men, or in the form of vulpine cunning by another set of men.

The outcome was equally fatal whether the country fell into the hands of a wealthy oligarchy, which exploited the poor, or whether it fell under the domination of a turbulent mob which plundered the rich.

In the long run, we all of us tend to go up or down together. It is all-essential to the continuance of our healthy national life that we should recognize this community of interest among our people.

We must keep ever in mind that a republic such as ours can exist only in virtue of the orderly liberty which comes through the equal domination of the law over all men alike and through its administration in such resolute and fearless fashion as shall teach all that no man is above it and no man below it.

Cedar Fall Gazette (Cedar Falls, Iowa) Sep 15, 1903

They Signed it on a Holiday

July 3, 2012

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Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) Jul 4, 1922

A Little Less Patter and A Lot More Fury

July 3, 2012

Not parades, not fireworks, not speeches or flagwaving will feature this fateful anniversary of the birth of our nation this year.

Instead grim-faced workmen toiling through the holiday in Fitchburg’s 100 per cent war industries, children and housewives still searching out precious scrap to add to the nation’s resources, civil defense unites going seriously about their protective duties and Fitchburg businessmen unselfishly contributing to the great community effort mark this 166th birthday of our independence.

This is a Fighting Fourth; bullets and bombs replace firecrackers and rockets. It’s time to face the issue squarely and to stop side-stepping and avoiding the sacrifices that must be made in the daily life of every man, woman, and child.

It’s time to show a little fury; to get mad at the things that are threatening the freedom we have gained through 166 years of sweat and struggle. We’re a free nation; we’re a fighting nation — read the battle-cries of the men who have fought to protect this country as they are dramatically presented by picture and story elsewhere in this issue of The Sentinel.

What is your battle-cry for this Fighting Fourth?

Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jul 3, 1942

FIGHTING WORDS FOR THE 4th

IF THERE were no man like Douglas MacArthur to say, “I came through, and I shall return;” if there had been no man like John Paul Jones to shout, “I have not yet begun to fight”; if there were no men like the doughboy at the left, who know such words in their hearts, even if they have not heard them spoken — if none of these men had ever lived, there would be no Independence Day now for America. On this page are pictured some of the Americans whose fighting words have echoed ’round the world. They are shown in the dramatic settings under which the words were spoken.

“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine whether Americans are to be freemen or slaves . . . . The fate of unborn millions will now depend, under God, on the courage and conduct of this Army. Our cruel and unrelenting enemy leaves us only the choice of a brave resistance, or the most abject submission. We have, therefore, to resolve to conquer or to die.

“Our own, our Country’s honour, calls upon us for a vigorous and manly exertion; and if we now shamefully fail, we shall become infamous to the whole world. Let us, then, rely on the goodness of our cause, and the aid of the Supreme Being, in whose hands victory is, to animate and encourage us to great and noble actions. The eyes of all our countrymen are now upon us; we shall have their blessings and praises, if happily we are the instruments of saving them from the tyranny meditated against them. Let us, therefore, animate and encourage each other, and show the whole world that a freeman contending for liberty . . . is superior to any slavish mercenary on earth.

“Liberty, property, life and honour are all at stake.”

— GEORGE WASHINGTON,  before Battle of Long Island, 1776.

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“Give me liberty, or give me death.” — Patrick Henry, 1775.

“Damn the torpedoes, and full speed ahead” — Admiral David Farragut, 1864.

“Don’t give up the ship.” — Capt. James Lawrence, 1813.

“Come on you __ __ __ do you want to live forever?” — Marine Sgt. Daniel Daly, 1918.

“I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country.” — Nathan Hale, 1776.

Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jul 3, 1942

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Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jul 3, 1942

Hugh Mulcahy, left, is greeted by Hank Greenberg on arrival at Air Force Officers’ school, at Miami Beach. Mulcahy, former pitching star of Philadelphia Nationals, and the big boy who hit home runs for the Detroit Americans are in the same league now.

Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jul 3, 1942

Story of Our Flag as Told by Nina Barwise

July 3, 2012

Image from BergerFine Arts

Story of Our Flag as Told by Nina Barwise

At the flag ceremony this morning Miss Nina Barwise read the following history of the Stars and Stripes.

It is not generally known and comes as a surprise to many Americans to realize that the Stars and Stripes is the oldest National flag in existence. Although the colonists frequently used devices of their own, the English flag was the flag of the country for more than one hundred and fifty years.

So different were the symbols of the colonies, regiments and ships that Washington, in 1775 wrote “Please fix some flag by which our vessels may know each other.”

In 1777 Congress appointed a committee consisting of General Washington, Robert Morris and Colonel Ross, “to designate a suitable flag for the nation.”

This committee as all the world knows conferred with Mistress Betsy Ross and afterwards recommended a flag in which the stripes recently introduced were retained, but in which the crosses, the symbol of British authority, gave place to the stars which were henceforth to shine for liberty.

This committee having reported on Jun 14, 1777 in old Independence Hall, Congress adopted the following resolution: “Resolved that the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, alternate, red and white; that the Union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constitution. The stars to be arranged in a circle.”

Enter here the Star Spangled Banner with thirty-seven years to wait for the song that was to immortalize the name.

The flag was not changed until 1795, when two stripes and two stars were added for Vermont and Kentucky. By 1816 four more states were in the family. Realizing that there must be a limit to the stripes, it was recommended that the flag be permanently thirteen stripes, representing the thirteen original states and that a new star be added for each state, as admitted. Since then a star has  been added to the flag on the Fourth of July following the admission of states to the Union.

The flag at the time of the resolution had thirteen stars. In the war of 1812 fifteen, in the Mexican war, 29, in the Civil war 35, and in the Spanish-American war 45; the number today 48.

When about to sail from Salem, Mass., in command of the big “Charles Doggett,” Captain Driver was presented with a large American flag. As it was went aloft and broken out into the air, he christened the beautiful emblem “Old Glory,” and this was the name he ever more used for it.

Ah, folks of white and scarlet; ah blue field with your silver stars! May kind eyes welcome you, willing feet follow you, strong hands defend you, warm hearts cherish you and dying lips give you their blessing.

Ours by inheritance, ours by allegiance, ours by affection; long may you float on the free winds of heaven, the emblem of liberty, the hope of the world.

Unfurl bright stripes shine forth, clear stars swing outward to the breeze.
Go bear your message to the wilds, go tell it to the seas;
That poor men sit  within our shade and rich men in their pride;
That beggar boys and statemen’s sons walk ‘neath you side by side.
You guard the school house on the green, the church upon the hill;
And fold your precious blessings round the cabin by the rill.
While weary hearts from every land beneath the shining sun,
Will work and rest and home  beneath the flag of Washington.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) Jul 4, 1912

**The Flag of Washington – by F.W. Gillett

Excerpt in above (not cited by Nina) – complete poem can be found in:

Title: The American Flag in Prose, Poetry and Song
Published: 1916
Page: 50

Fathers Get Their Day

June 17, 2012

Butler County Democrat – Ohio – Jun 11, 1914

FATHERS’ DAY TO BE OBSERVED JUNE 19.

Spokane, Wash., June 16.

Officers of the Spokane Ministerial alliance and the Young Men’s Christian Association of Spokane are sending invitations to churches and allied organizations in towns and cities all over the United States to pay tribute to the head of the house on Fathers’ day, June 19, the rose being suggested as a suitable flower to wear on the occasion.

Mrs. J.B. Dodd of 610 Sharp avenue, Spokane, who is the originator of the idea, thus explained the plan for a national movement in a petition to the ministers of this city:

“The beautiful custom of Mothers’ day suggests the question: Why not a Fathers’ day? This is further emphasized by the celebration of Children’s day by our Sunday schools.

“Fathers’ day would call attention to such constructive teachings from the pulpit as would naturally point out:

“The father’s place in the home.

“The training of children.

“The safeguarding of the marriage ties.

“The protection of womanhood and childhood.

“The meaning of this, whether in the light of religion or of patriotism, is so apparent as to need no argument.”

Butler County Democrat (Hamilton, Ohio) Jun 23, 1910

WHAT? A FATHER’S DAY?

WE HAD TO DO IT

They Are Getting the Worst of It! Who?

Why, the Fond Papas, of Course.

THERE, little world, don’t cry!
For you need something new, I know.
Of parties told,
Chestnuts old,
You have wearied long ago,
But, TODAY holds all for which you sigh —
There, little world, don’t cry!

SUNFLOWER SENTIMENT

Spokane did it — so why can’t we?

We will. It is FATHER’S DAY.

Of course it is generally assumed, and generally true, that there are fixed rules for setting aside a day to be devoted to tender sentiment, or patriotic display, but here’s where the exception comes in.

Probably you will think the day unlegal because the governor didn’t issue a proclamation. Well, I’ll tell you, Governor Mills is, as you know, the most obliging man in politics or out (it looks like the latter, now) and would have been glad to set aside this day had he been duly notified. Thought about telegraphing him yesterday that we were going to pull off a Fathers’ day here, but he was in Las Vegas where they were having a Fathers’ day all their own, and you can well imagine that the telegram would have been lost in the shuffle.

Anyhow, it’s FATHERS’ DAY.

Mother’s had her day, dedicated to tender sentiment and made evident by wearing carnations, and it’s only fair that one day of the year should be set aside formally and ceremoniously to honor him who pays the bills.

Much thought has been given the selection of a flower symbolic of fatherhood. After hours of thought and deliberation the SUNFLOWER has been selected. Why, I don’t know. The small sunflower typifies “Adoration,” and the big sunflower means “You Are Splendid.”

The big sunflower for ours.

That’s settled. Wear a sunflower today in honor of Father.

You see Mother has been featured in song, the motive of opera and the theme of literature — she’s had her inning and deserves it. But — what would a home be without Father?

He’s been getting the worst of it.

Nobody writes sentimental songs about Father; nobody indites sonnets to his manly beauty or perfections. Supplanted in the home, his position in the world of politics is now threatened. Working now to buy the baby shoes — soon he will have to put them on.

Poor Father! Not a “has-been,” for he “never was.” Just an “also-ran.” Whip up some sentiment for the occasion — grow tearful at thought of Father. Think but a moment of his checkered career.

Nothing to eat, but Mother’s food.
Nothing to drink but booze,
Nothing to wear; dressed like a dude;
Nothing to gain — all to lose.

No place to loiter but the club,
Nothing to play but sluff;
No place to go but home,
Rough on Father — very rough!

Albuquerque Morning Journal (Albuquerque, New Mexico) Oct 1, 1911

Father’s Day.

Gabe — I see that they celebrated Mothers’ Day. Why don’t they have a Fathers’ Day?

Steve — Father has every Saturday night, hasn’t he?

Bayard Advocate (Bayard, Iowa) Jun 27, 1912

Cambridge City Tribune (Cambridge City, Indiana) Jun 17, 1926

FATHER’S DAY.

June 16th is Father’s Day, and we want to urge everyone not to overlook this occasion. For some reason, Mother’s Day is much more widely observed than Father’s Day. This is understandable in the light of the beautiful sentiments that are aroused by the very word “mother” — yet father need not be neglected, as too often he seems to be.

Father may seem indifferent to such an occasion as Father’s Day. Probably, if asked, he would call it “nonsense” and ask his children to “forget it.”

Father may seem austere, or too practical to care for such trinkets as you might be moved to purchase for him, or, in many cases, it might seem ridiculous to present him with a gift out of his own money.

But remember one thing! A man is only a boy grown up. Your father, no matter what his exterior, has hidden away in his heart a little boy. And that little boy will come to the surface and with father will retire to his room as happy about the red pair of suspenders, or the tie, or the box of cigars that you have given him, as any little boy would be about a box of marbles or a baseball glove.

Don’t be fooled by your father. He likes little attentions just as much as mother does.

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Jun 14, 1929

Big Piney Examiner (Big Piney, Wyoming) May 8, 1947

NEXT SUNDAY IS FATHER’S day. In a nutshell, here is the purpose of Dad’s Day: To build a strong America, through wholesome child upbringing …….

Bruce News-Letter (Bruce, Wisconsin) Jun 16, 1949

A Word Of Tribute To Dad

The National Father’s Day committee has issued a father’s “Ten Commandments” for good citizenship. As Sunday will be Father’s day, the man of the family may want to check the list of commandments to determine his rating. Here is the list:

By and large, we believe the fathers do a good job. They are not perfect and no one expects them to be perfect, but most of them have deep interest in their children and genuine affection for them, even though they may seem gruff at times. Fathers may differ in their methods, but all of them strive to help their children over the rough spots in life and get them off to a good start.

In a great many families, gifts will be presented on Father’s day. That is well and good, but for most fathers, we believe that expressing a few words of appreciation will be welcomed above everything else. A little work here and there can do wonders to cement family ties and to give a lift to those who have found today’s burdens much greater than they had expected. To make a good home is not a simple task, and those who have been successful in that respect deserve every tribute that can be paid to them.

Do not let Sunday pass without making at least some gesture that would be pleasing to Dad.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 16, 1951

Sign of a Nation, Great and Strong

June 14, 2012

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1947

Our American Flag

Our flag has valor for stripes of red,
A gruesome symbol of the blood shed
To preserve precious freedom of speech,
Right in public assembly to preach.

Pureness of purposes the white shows,
Gives the choice of religion which grows
As we worship in the church we choose,
Nothing that is right do we refuse.

The blue is for courage, loyalty
Of women left behind, royalty
Brave, to whom the war will never end,
Vets’ broken bodies, spirits, they mend.

Stars for states that love, honor, our flag,
A grand symbol, not only a rag,
In service blue ones in windows hung,
Were gold, when taps for heroes was sung.

The American Flag, red, white, blue,
As it waves up high for me or you,
Represents the best of life’s treasure,
Privileges so great none can measure!

(Melitta Foeste King)

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 13, 1959

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1945

Observing Flag Day

Ample opportunity will be afforded Sunday for the public to participate in observance of Flag Day.

The people will be paying homage Sunday for the last time — officially — to the 48-star flag. It is the standard the people have known longest — since Arizona was admitted to the Union in 1912. The 48-star flag will be superseded on July 4 by a new flag recognizing Alaska as the 49th state. The life of the new standard will be brief. On July 4, 1960, it will be replaced by a flag with a 50th star for Hawaii.

Display of the new flag would be improper before Independence Day, but after that day the 48-star emblems will not be discarded. The White House announced early this year that “with limited exceptions, agencies of the federal government will continue to display the 48-star flag so long as it is still in good condition.”

Observance of Flag Day dates back to June 14, 1885, when Dr. Bernard Cigrand, then a 19-year-old teacher at the Stony Hill school near Wauheka and Fredonia in Ozaukee County, had his students write themes on the subject of the American Flag. The next year he proposed that the day be observed nationally. However, it was not until 1916 that President Woodrow Wilson issued an official Flag Day proclamation.

In observing Flag Day, it would be well to note that a number of countries have adopted the Red, White and Blue in tribute to the encouragement given them by the United States in their efforts to gain independence. This is particularly true in regard to the Republics of Liberia, Cuba, Panama, and the Philippines. Each of these independent nations directly owes its existence to the fact hat such a course was fostered by your country. As a result, their flags derive from the Stars and Stripes of the United States.

The refusal of Spain to withdraw troops from Cuba led to occupation of the island by American forces. After the defeat of the Spanish in 1898, American military rule continued only long enough for the Cubans to adopt a constitution and elect their first congress. This congress met for the first time in 1902.

Granting full freedom for the Philippines was more recent. It took two wars to wrest the Filipinos from Spanish and later Japanese rulers. They obtained full freedom in 1946, shortly after World War II, and at a time when the Russian Communists were destroying freedom in such countries as Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Poland, Czechoslovakia, and large parts of the Balkan area.

The red, white and blue flags of these countries provide the answer to the claims of Russian Communists that our country is imperialistic. Further answer is found in this country’s favorable attitude toward efforts of other areas to gain independence.

Thus, in paying tribute to the U.S. Flag tomorrow, we will be recognizing not only the freedoms enjoyed in our country but in other republics as well.
As in previous years, Flag Day ceremonies will be held at the Cigrand memorial in Waubeka early Sunday afternoon and at the restored Stony Hill schoolhouse at 4:30 p.m. Locally, a special Flag Day program has been arranged by the Sheboygan Lodge of the Elks, beginning at 1 p.m. with a motorcade from intersection of 8th Street and Ontario Avenue to the Elks Club at 1943 Erie Ave.

We are also reminded that display of the flag throughout the community will be an important contribution to the observance of Flag Day.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) 13 Jun 1959

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1922

Let’s Read About — Old Glory

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
As often as we can —
It’s fascinating history,
A thrill packed story,
For every American.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
The story of her birth —
Man’s boundless faith
In Men of fate —
Born to glorify the earth.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
And meet those noble souls
Who night and day
Fought all the way . . .
Immortalizing their roles.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
And learn on what blest morn
George told Betsy what to do
With stars and stripes, and know
How our GRAND FLAG was born.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
And the Freedoms she unfurls —
Freeing King and Slave
From a coward’s grave . . .
In both worlds.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
As often as we can —
A blood and thunder history
For Liberty and Democracy,
The glory of every American.

ELIO ORFEO CENCI
April 6, 1948
High Falls, N.Y.

Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York) Apr 16, 1948

About Bernard J. Cigrand:

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1945

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Read more: The National Flag Day Foundation

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Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1947

We are fortunate, indeed!

The Blue and the Gray

May 28, 2012

The Blue and the Gray.

(On the Unveiling, on Monument Day, of the Monument to the Confederate Dead at Chicago.)

The conflict’s o’er, the banner’s furled,
A cause is lost and won,
And martyred heroes sweetly rest
‘Neath stars or glowing sun.
Some calmly lie where gleaming shafts
Rise proudly toward the sky;
Some sleep in the hush of wooded nooks
Where light winds softly sigh.

Some rest where once the battle raged
In tempest of shot and shell,
Where deeds of valor were grandly wrought
And brave men fought and fell —
Fell ‘mid gleam of musket and sword,
And glory of battle array,
And their names and valiant deeds are sung
In the poet’s grandest lay.

But those whose graves are decked today
By friends and erstwhile foes,
Are those whose life-tide ebbed away
‘Mid prison’s gloom and woes.
Far from their sunny homes they sleep —
The homes they loved so well,
The homes for which they sternly faced
The foe and a prison hell.

But garlands fair their graves adorn,
Blest covenants of peace;
And hand meets hand in clasp which tells
That hate and strife must cease.

Tread softly now, ’tis hallowed ground
Where “blue” and “gray” clasp hands,
And mingled tears above the dust
Where sleep these patriot bands.
And they who once were bitter foes
But now are brothers true,
Sing equal praises to the brave,
Wore they the gray or blue.

And this majestic monument,
Unwelled with love and pride,
A tribute is from the living brave
To the brave and true who died.

— LOUISE THREETE HODGES.

May 30, 1895.

The Atlanta Constitution (Atlanta, Georgia) May 30, 1895

Images from Wikipedia

Fallen Heros – Old Soldiers Day

May 28, 2012

The Daily Northwester (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) May 30, 1890

OLD SOLDIERS DAY.
MEMORIAL SERVICES IN OSHKOSH.

The speaker closed with the following poem of his own composition:

Brave, Generous Boys
Who shouldered quick their guns
And to the front they pressed,
Giving a life to save a life,
Dying that we might bless.

And the mother with heart un-speakable
Thinks of the blessful past,
And the image of her loving boy
Her noblest and her last.

But death came sternly with a touch
No mother’s love could shield;
Soon mouldering were those laughing eyes
On a southern battle field.

And the lonely mother left
Of sorrow has her share,
Deeming her country’s sacrifice
Is greater than she can bear.

But she thinks of Spartan mothers
In those cruel days gone by,
While firmer grows her trembling lip
And drier grows her eye.

And peace comes stealing o’er her soul
And mixing with tints her tears,
Paints immortal her boy
To shine undimmed by coming years.

There he is safe, serene and blessed,
The mother needs our care.
Her sorrows be divided up —
Let’s each one take a share.

To scared trust we’ll all prove true and guard it well with care,
And on the thirtieth of May,
With songs and blossoms rare,
We’ll gather round the brave boys’ tombs
In gratitude and prayer.

W.W. Kimball, orator of the day.

The Daily Northwester (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) May 30, 1891

Under the sod and the dew,

Waiting the judgment day,

Love and tears for the Blue,

Tears and Love for the Gray.

The Daily Northwester (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) May 30, 1893