Posts Tagged ‘Independence Day’

They Signed it on a Holiday

July 3, 2012

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Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) Jul 4, 1922

A Little Less Patter and A Lot More Fury

July 3, 2012

Not parades, not fireworks, not speeches or flagwaving will feature this fateful anniversary of the birth of our nation this year.

Instead grim-faced workmen toiling through the holiday in Fitchburg’s 100 per cent war industries, children and housewives still searching out precious scrap to add to the nation’s resources, civil defense unites going seriously about their protective duties and Fitchburg businessmen unselfishly contributing to the great community effort mark this 166th birthday of our independence.

This is a Fighting Fourth; bullets and bombs replace firecrackers and rockets. It’s time to face the issue squarely and to stop side-stepping and avoiding the sacrifices that must be made in the daily life of every man, woman, and child.

It’s time to show a little fury; to get mad at the things that are threatening the freedom we have gained through 166 years of sweat and struggle. We’re a free nation; we’re a fighting nation — read the battle-cries of the men who have fought to protect this country as they are dramatically presented by picture and story elsewhere in this issue of The Sentinel.

What is your battle-cry for this Fighting Fourth?

Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jul 3, 1942

FIGHTING WORDS FOR THE 4th

IF THERE were no man like Douglas MacArthur to say, “I came through, and I shall return;” if there had been no man like John Paul Jones to shout, “I have not yet begun to fight”; if there were no men like the doughboy at the left, who know such words in their hearts, even if they have not heard them spoken — if none of these men had ever lived, there would be no Independence Day now for America. On this page are pictured some of the Americans whose fighting words have echoed ’round the world. They are shown in the dramatic settings under which the words were spoken.

“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine whether Americans are to be freemen or slaves . . . . The fate of unborn millions will now depend, under God, on the courage and conduct of this Army. Our cruel and unrelenting enemy leaves us only the choice of a brave resistance, or the most abject submission. We have, therefore, to resolve to conquer or to die.

“Our own, our Country’s honour, calls upon us for a vigorous and manly exertion; and if we now shamefully fail, we shall become infamous to the whole world. Let us, then, rely on the goodness of our cause, and the aid of the Supreme Being, in whose hands victory is, to animate and encourage us to great and noble actions. The eyes of all our countrymen are now upon us; we shall have their blessings and praises, if happily we are the instruments of saving them from the tyranny meditated against them. Let us, therefore, animate and encourage each other, and show the whole world that a freeman contending for liberty . . . is superior to any slavish mercenary on earth.

“Liberty, property, life and honour are all at stake.”

— GEORGE WASHINGTON,  before Battle of Long Island, 1776.

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“Give me liberty, or give me death.” — Patrick Henry, 1775.

“Damn the torpedoes, and full speed ahead” — Admiral David Farragut, 1864.

“Don’t give up the ship.” — Capt. James Lawrence, 1813.

“Come on you __ __ __ do you want to live forever?” — Marine Sgt. Daniel Daly, 1918.

“I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country.” — Nathan Hale, 1776.

Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jul 3, 1942

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Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jul 3, 1942

Hugh Mulcahy, left, is greeted by Hank Greenberg on arrival at Air Force Officers’ school, at Miami Beach. Mulcahy, former pitching star of Philadelphia Nationals, and the big boy who hit home runs for the Detroit Americans are in the same league now.

Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jul 3, 1942

Story of Our Flag as Told by Nina Barwise

July 3, 2012

Image from BergerFine Arts

Story of Our Flag as Told by Nina Barwise

At the flag ceremony this morning Miss Nina Barwise read the following history of the Stars and Stripes.

It is not generally known and comes as a surprise to many Americans to realize that the Stars and Stripes is the oldest National flag in existence. Although the colonists frequently used devices of their own, the English flag was the flag of the country for more than one hundred and fifty years.

So different were the symbols of the colonies, regiments and ships that Washington, in 1775 wrote “Please fix some flag by which our vessels may know each other.”

In 1777 Congress appointed a committee consisting of General Washington, Robert Morris and Colonel Ross, “to designate a suitable flag for the nation.”

This committee as all the world knows conferred with Mistress Betsy Ross and afterwards recommended a flag in which the stripes recently introduced were retained, but in which the crosses, the symbol of British authority, gave place to the stars which were henceforth to shine for liberty.

This committee having reported on Jun 14, 1777 in old Independence Hall, Congress adopted the following resolution: “Resolved that the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, alternate, red and white; that the Union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constitution. The stars to be arranged in a circle.”

Enter here the Star Spangled Banner with thirty-seven years to wait for the song that was to immortalize the name.

The flag was not changed until 1795, when two stripes and two stars were added for Vermont and Kentucky. By 1816 four more states were in the family. Realizing that there must be a limit to the stripes, it was recommended that the flag be permanently thirteen stripes, representing the thirteen original states and that a new star be added for each state, as admitted. Since then a star has  been added to the flag on the Fourth of July following the admission of states to the Union.

The flag at the time of the resolution had thirteen stars. In the war of 1812 fifteen, in the Mexican war, 29, in the Civil war 35, and in the Spanish-American war 45; the number today 48.

When about to sail from Salem, Mass., in command of the big “Charles Doggett,” Captain Driver was presented with a large American flag. As it was went aloft and broken out into the air, he christened the beautiful emblem “Old Glory,” and this was the name he ever more used for it.

Ah, folks of white and scarlet; ah blue field with your silver stars! May kind eyes welcome you, willing feet follow you, strong hands defend you, warm hearts cherish you and dying lips give you their blessing.

Ours by inheritance, ours by allegiance, ours by affection; long may you float on the free winds of heaven, the emblem of liberty, the hope of the world.

Unfurl bright stripes shine forth, clear stars swing outward to the breeze.
Go bear your message to the wilds, go tell it to the seas;
That poor men sit  within our shade and rich men in their pride;
That beggar boys and statemen’s sons walk ‘neath you side by side.
You guard the school house on the green, the church upon the hill;
And fold your precious blessings round the cabin by the rill.
While weary hearts from every land beneath the shining sun,
Will work and rest and home  beneath the flag of Washington.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) Jul 4, 1912

**The Flag of Washington – by F.W. Gillett

Excerpt in above (not cited by Nina) – complete poem can be found in:

Title: The American Flag in Prose, Poetry and Song
Published: 1916
Page: 50

The Old American Flag

July 2, 2012

Image from The Gadsden Flag

From the London Chronicle.

The Old American Flag.

The American Standard is thus described. The colors of the American fleet have a snake with thirteen rattles, the fourteenth budding, described in the attitude of going to strike, with this motto “Don’t tread on me.” It is a rule in heraldry that the worthy properties of the crest bone shall be considered and the base one intended. The ancients accounted a snake or a serpent, an emblem of wisdom, and in certain attitudes of endless duration. The rattle snake is properly a representative of America, as this animal is found in no other part of the world. The eye of this creature excels in brightness that of any other animal. She has no eye-lid, and is therefore an emblem of vigilance. — She never begins an attack nor ever surrenders. She is therefore an emblem of magnanimity and true courage. When injured she never wounds till she gives notice to her enemies in danger.

No other of her kind show such generosity. When undisturbed and in peace, she does not appear to be furnished with weapons of any kind. They are latent in the roof of her mouth, and even when extended for her defense, appear to those who are not acquainted with her to be weak and contemptible, yet her wounds, however small, are decisive and fatal. She is solitary and associates with her kind only when it is necessary for their preservation. Her poison is at once the necessary means of digesting her food, and certain destruction of her enemies. The power of fascination attributed to her by a generous construction resembles America. Those who look steadily upon her are delighted and involuntarily advance toward her. She is frequently found with thirteen rattles, and they increase yearly. She is beautiful in youth, and her beauty increases with her age; her tongue is blue and forked as lightning.

Hillsdale Whig Standard (Hillsdale, Michigan) Jul 3, 1849

We Hold These Truths to be Self-Evident

July 4, 2011

The Fourth of July.

To the sages who spoke, to the heroes who bled,
To the day and deed, strike the harpstrings of glory!
Let the song of the ransomed remember the dead,
And the tongue of the eloquent hallow the story!
O’er the bones of the bold
Be the story long told,
And on fame’s golden tablets the triumphs enrolled,
Who on freedom’s green hills freedom’s banner unfurled,
And the beacon-fired raised that gave light to the world!
They are gone — mighty men! — and they sleep in their fame;
Shall we ever forget them? Oh, no, never!
Let our sons learn from us to embalm each great name
And the anthem send down — “Independence forever!”
Wake, wake, heart and tongue!
Keep the theme ever young;
Let their deeds through the long line of ages be sung
Who on freedom’s green hills freedom’s banner unfurled,
And the beacon-fire raised that gave light to the world!

— Charles Sprague

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Jul 3, 1939

Celebrating Freedom and Independence

July 3, 2011

Letter from Senator Oldham.

RICHMOND, VA., January, 20th, 1865
[Excerpt]

Thus might the patriot manfully say:
“So freedom now so seldom makes
The only throb she gives,
As when some heart indignant breaks,
To tell that still she lives.”

No, better die ten thousand deaths battling for Liberty and right, than live a life so pregnant with ignominious shame.”

W.S. OLDHAM

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) Feb 21, 1865

Centennial Poem.

Delivered by Hon. H.H. Hogan, at Reno, Nevada, July 4th, 1876.

With joy we hail our natal day!
Again we meet to homage pay,
And our exultant voices raise
In never ceasing songs of praise,
Unto the men so true and brave,
Those who to us our country gave;
And to give thanks to Him above,
For His great mercy and the love
He unto us has ever shown,
Since we a nation have been known.
Again the deeds of valor tell,
Of those who fought and those who fell;
Again recall the names of those
Who dealt destruction to their foes,
On battle field, on raging sea,
Their war-cry always victory.
Of Warren tell, so true and brave,
Who’d sooner die than be a slave;
He, when offer’d supreme command
Quickly grasped his gun in hand,
And to his gen’ral firmly said,
I fight where falls the thickest lead.
Of Washington, whose name will be
Revered unto Eternity,
In every clime, in every land
Where freemen breathe and freemen stand,
Upon the rights of man to man.
Of Henry bold, whose clarion tongue
Loud out in House of Burgess rung,
With stentorian eager cry,
Give to me death or liberty.
Not only men but women too,
In those days were staunch and true.
Moll Pitcher fought with bated breath
T’ avenge with blood her husband’s death,
On Monmouth’s field neath sweltering sun
By foes outnumbered two to one;
With form erect, and fearless mien,
None braver on that field were seen.
That widow in the old North State,
Whose age was nearly sixty-eight,
When asked by him who had command
For food himself with all his band,
She by herself did food prepare,
Of coarse but good substantial fare.
When they had finished their repast,
Each sated full his long felt fast,
To her again their leader then
Advanced to pay for all his men.
To you dear dame our gold we bring,
You serve of course our honored King.
Take back your gold ne’er be it said
That I for gold gave to you bread,
I gave you food as way my duty,
But not for gold, nor spoil, nor booty.
I serve your King! can such things be?
A charge like that and that of me?
In me, young man, in me behold,
A widow childless, worn and old;
Yet I was blessed with seven sons,
None ever bore more manly ones,
Who with their sire went forth to fight,
In Honor’s cause, for truth and right;
But non returned, all, all were lain
In graves unmarked upon the plain.
Look on this hand, so thin and poor,
These trembling limbs so near death’s door.
Had they the vigored strength of youth,
I, even I, would fight for truth.
But still to me ’tis thought most dear,
That when I’m called to leave this sphere,
Him shall I meet, him with the seven,
With their Maker, God, in Heaven.
Why speak of these, or names recall,
When all were heroes, each and all,
Each Mother offered up her prayer
That God would make his special care,
And safe return to her her son
As soon as freedom’s boon was won.
Each father with determined stand
Grasped his musket firm in hand,
And swore by Him above the sky
That he would conquer or would die.
For seven years amid toil and strife,
They fought exposing health and life;
They fought as brave men ever fight,
For God, Humanity and Right;
For parents, freedom, home and wife,
For children, liberty and life;
At times with hunger sore oppressed,
At times with clothing thinly dressed,
At Morristown for miles around
Their bare footprints in snow were found,
With sinews like the tempered steel,
These men seemed not to hardships feel,
But always eager for the fray
Came it by night, came it by day;
Not for vengeance, but with the thought
Each victory won the nearer brought
The time when Peace would them restore
To home, with friends, to part no more.
Nor were their toils and suff’ring vain,
They in the end did vict’ry gain
And have to us their children given
A boon, the dearest under Heaven;
A country vast, of wide domain
Made up of valley, hill and plain.
Where freemen live by honest toil
In happiness, and own the soil.
Where virtue brings its own reward,
Where every man stands out a lord.
Our land of every land most blessed,
Our Government the very best,
Here meet all nations of the earth
To celebrate our country’s birth.
No Oligarchs with titles old
Can tithings take, or rob our fold,
For us no tax for King remains,
For us no tyrant forges chains;
We can exclaim o’er land and sea,
In tones exultant, we are free.
For us n North, no South, shall be,
No East, no West, but unity;
With stern resolve to guard our land
From ruthless grasp of foreign hand;
And may that emblem of the free
To unborn nations yet to be.
Stand as did those pillar’d lights
To Moses and the Israelites,
When storms assail our Ship of State.
Do thou, Oh, God! Almighty! Great!
Avert the storm at Thy command,
Or guard us with Thy shelt’ring hand;
And may this our first Centennial
Be to others as perennial,
Till shall come the day Millennial.

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Jul 5, 1876

Image from Find-A-Grave

The Passing of One of Reno’s Grand Old Men.

Dr. H.H. Hogan sleeps now. His noble life work is ended. Like the physician Ian McLaurin told us about in “Beside the Bonny Brier Bush,” Dr. Hogan was a willing servant of the poor. Many a time he accepted a less fee than was tendered him. Many a poor patient was tenderly and skillfully cared for and when asked for his bill, the good old physician would reply with a wave of his hand: “It is nothing.”

Henry Hardy Hogan closed his eyes at dawn yesterday morning. The light of the sun he did not see. His spirit eyes beheld the radiance of the city not built with hands.

He was the oldest physician in Nevada. Born in Alburg, Vermont, three score and eight years ago, he spent his boyhood days in the Green mountains. He had graduated from two medical colleges when Abraham Lincoln called him to arms.

The doctor enlisted in Co. G, 142d New York Infantry, and took part in many a battle for the flag.

After the war he came to Nevada and began the practice of medicine. He is survived by a wife, a son and an adopted daughter.

The funeral of this good man will take place from his late residence on Center street at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon.

Daily Nevada State Journal (Reno, Nevada) Mar 18, 1902

From the History of Washoe County (PDF):

…Washoe County pioneer Henry Hardy Hogan, M. D. Hogan had been born in Vermont in 1834, attended a college in Albany, New York, and studied medicine at a medical school in Burlington, Vermont. He enlisted as a private in the New York infantry for service in the Civil War and was discharged honorably on account of disability in 1863. Arriving at Ophir, Nevada Territory, in 1864, he resided there until moving to Reno when that town became the county seat. Hogan took a great interest in politics, serving in the Nevada legislature from Washoe County during the 1871, 1875 and 1895 sessions. In 1881 he established and edited the Plaindealer, a weekly and later a twice weekly Greenback paper, which suspended operations in 1884. The newspaper was revived in 1895 and lasted until 1899. On his death in Reno in 1902, Hogan was one of the oldest physicians residing in Nevada….

How Not to Enjoy the Fourth

July 2, 2011

PLEASANT MOTORING

RUN OUT OF GASOLINE!

BURN OUT A BEARING!

WORK UP STEAM!

GET PUSHED AROUND!

BE A BLOW-OUT VICTIM!

GET LOST!

I remember when gas stations used to provide these services — Those were the days!

SERIOUSLY SPEAKING

Standard Oil Dealers are in a position to give you service and supplies that will make your Fourth of July motor trip more enjoyable and less costly. Such things as clean windshield and windows, air for tires, and water for radiators are free, of course. And in addition to good gasoline and motor oil, they can furnish expert chassis lubrication, spark-plug and headlight bulb replacement, tires and batteries. A few minutes under the STANDARD SERVICE sign before you start your trip will be time well spent.

MORE THAN 23,000 STANDARD OIL DEALERS ARE AT YOUR SERVICE

Hammond Times (Hammond, Indiana) Jul 1, 1939

Seth Bullock – Before Deadwood

August 4, 2010

Main St. - Helena, MT - 1872 (Image from http://www.cardcow.com)

While I was researching Robert V. Carr, the official poet of Seth Bullock’s Cowboy Brigade, I decided to search “Seth Bullock” to see if  I could find any Carr references. That didn’t turn out to be fruitful in regards to Carr, but I did run across quite a bit more on Seth Bullock. Since I found so many news articles, I typed them up, and  have decided to break them up into at least two separate posts. This first one covers Seth’s time in Montana – before he went to Deadwood. (Updated: 8/11/10)

Attempt to Break Jail.

A well conceived attempt to break jail was frustrated yesterday morning by the vigilance of Sheriff Bullock. It has been known to the Sheriff and his deputy that for several days past the prisoners were preparing to escape, but the keen eye of Bullock had watched their maneuvres, and he and the Under Sheriff have been standing guard, armed with double-barreled shot guns to prevent their escape. The prisoners had succeeded in cutting the iron of the inner door — not quite through, but leaving just sufficient uncut for the door to swing without falling down — and knowing that the outer door is not closed until about 9 o’clock at night, it was their intention to wrench the inner door from its hinges between the hours of 7 and 9 p.m. and effect their escape. Their plans were well laid and their failure is due to the strict guard kept over them.

The master spirit in the attempt was Samuel O. Duster. N.B. Larabee and Wm. Brooks (colored), also inmates, are not supposed to have been very active in the work. It was one of these latter names that informed the Sheriff of what was going on. The Sheriff has decorated the prisoners with his strongest and most approved style of jewelry; and now his slumbers are peaceful. We understand that it is the intention of District Attorney Toole to try this case mutilating or injuring county property to test the validity of the law inflicting punishment in such cases.

The Daily Independent (Helena, Montana) Apr 15, 1874

1870 Census - Helena - Seth Bullock

A SURE THING.

Saturday, May 30, at 10 o’clock.

You will find at the auction sale of Jno. E. McDonald, on Spruce and Dearborn streets, household goods, consisting of parlor, dining-room and kitchen furniture, a handsome marble top bed-room set, with English Brussels and three-ply carpets, cooking and heating stoves, a spring mattrass, a magnificent French clock, a perfect time-keeper, strikes the hours and half-hours, a water-fall, a gold finch taking his regular drinks, and music attached that will soothe a cross baby to sleep; books, magazines, chromos, etc., a Grover & Baker sewing machine, also a top buggy, with a set of gold mounted harness. Sale positive.

SETH BULLOCK.
dtd-my26     Auctioneer.

The Daily Independent (Helena, Montana) May 26, 1874

1874

Helena Engine Company No. 1.

A special meeting of the above Company will be held in the Engine House on Saturday evening at 8 o’clock to make arrangements for an appropriate celebration of the 4th of July. A full attendance is requested.

By order     SETH BULLOCK,

W.J. AUERBACH, Secy.     Foreman.

The Daily Independent (Helena, Montana) May 29, 1974

Sheriff Bullock started yesterday for Deer Lodge with three prisoners for the penitentiary — Lackland Frazier, Harry Clifford, and Samuel O. Duston, sentenced for one year each.

The Daily Independent (Helena, Montana) Jun 7, 1874

BOLD ROBBERY.

Sheriff Bullock, yesterday afternoon, sent a prisoner by the name of Jimmy Phillips, now confined in jail on the charge of petit larceny, after a bucket of water. Noticing that he was gone longer than was necessary, he stepped out of the jail to see what had become of the prisoner. He, however, made his appearance in a moment or two.

Jesse Armitage’s store was near by, and he soon missed some money out of the drawer. He communicated the fact to Sheriff Bullock, who proceeded to search the prisoner, and found it upon him. This may be considered one of the sharpest tricks ever played by a prisoner in this country. While the bucket was being filled he had stepped into the store and robbed the drawer of its contents so quietly and quickly that he was not detected in the act. He then got his bucket of water and returned to the jail. Young Phillips is evidently a hard case, and nothing but iron bars will ever be able to restrain him from taking other people’s property.

The Daily Independent ( Helena, Montana) Jul 3, 1874

Helena Library - not the original (Image from http://www.cardcow.com)

Here is a link with the history of the Lewis & Clark Library.

Library Festival.

The Helena Library Association will have a festival this evening in the Herald building on Broadway. No pains have been spared by the Committees to make it a pleasant affair. A noble object we trust that it will be well attended.

Committee on Arrangements —
Mrs. W.C. Child, Mrs. J.R. Gilbert, Mrs. E.W. Knight, Mrs. ?.W. Cannon, Mrs. D.A.G. Flowe??ee, Mrs. Dr. L.W. Frary, Mrs. Sam I. Neel, Mrs. Wm Sims, Mrs. A.J. Davidson, Mrs. Jon. McCormick, Mrs. A.J. Smith, Mrs. R.L. McCulloch, Mrs. T.O. Groshon, Mrs. Nick Kessler, Miss Clara Guthrie, Mr. Benj. Stickney, Wm. Nowlan, W.?. Chessman, A.H. Beattie and S.C. Ashby.

Ice Cream Committee —
Miss Lou Gutherie, Miss Mary Pope, Miss Mather, Miss Bailey, Miss Hattie Rumley, Miss Jennie Totten, Miss D. Anchel, Miss Marabel, Julia Coates, Mrs. Mae Bromley, Mr. C.G. Reynolds, Jno. Heldt, Aaron Hershfield, H. Wyttenbach, and Seth Bullock.

NOTE: I am trying to picture Seth Bullock serving ice cream!

I didn’t type all the names listed for the following committees:

Committee on Strawberries — …
Committee on Tables — …
Lemonade Committee — …
Reception Committee — …
Floor Managers — …

The Daily Independent (Helena, Montana) Jul 8, 1874

Helena - Main St. Looking South (Image from http://www.cardcow.com)

Mardi Gras Hop.

For the benefit of the Helena Library Association, will begin at International Hall, on Broadway, on Tuesday evening, February 9th, 1875.

General Managing Committee —
C. Hedges, D.S. Wade, W.F. Sanders, S. Koenigsberger, Wm Roe, John Kinna, S.H. Crounse, D.C. Corbin, W.C. Child.

Committee on Reception —
A. Sands, T.H. Kleinschmidt, A.M. Holter, R.E. Fisk, Seth Bullock, H.M. Parchen, C.A. Broadwater, W.F. Chadwick, A.J. Simmons.

Committee on Invitation — …
Committee on Music — …
Committee on Supper — …
Committee on Tickets — …
Floor Managers — …

Music will be furnished by Prof. Hewin’s band, and no pains will be spared by the Professor to make the music lively.

The hall will be kept comfortable by a stove at each end.

Tickets will be sold at the door at $2.50 each.

Supper will be served at the St. Louis Hotel, and will be separate and apart from the tickets for the hop.

The Committee on Invitations hereby extend a general invitation to all.

Dancing will commence precisely at 8 1/2 o’clock. Supper will be announced at 11 1/2 o’clock.

The Daily Independent (Helena, Montana) Feb 5, 1875

Helena Volunteer Firemen - Seth Bullock (3rd from left)

Image from Deadwood S.D. Revealed

FIREMAN’S BALL.

Washington’s Birthday, February 22d, 1875.

For the Benefit of the Fire Department.

Committee of Arrangements —
Seth Bullock, M.M. Chase, Wm. Sims, Henry Klein, A.R. Wright, Ted Sweeney, Joseph Davis, J.P. Woolman.

Committee on Supper and Soliciting — …
Committee on Music — …
Committee on Decoration — …
Committee of Reception — …
Floor Managers — …
Committee on Selling Tickets — …

The Daily Independent (Helena, Montana) Feb 20, 1875

1875

Sheriff Bullock, whose absence from town has been observed more than a week, has been heard from at San Francisco. It is surmised that his visit has some connection with a gentleman who operated here a few years ago as “our wealthy banker,” but whose last days in Helena were passed in the company of a deputy sheriff. It is rumored that the sum of $7,000 has been offered to compromise the case in suit.

The Daily Independent (Helena, Montana) Mar 18, 1875

Fred. Shaffer Captured.

Below will be found the dispatches received by Sheriff Bullock yesterday relative to the capture of Shaffer and his companions at Bismarck. These dispatches were sent by mail from Corinne, hence the delay in receiving them. We learn that a requisition will be at once issued, and an officer promptly dispatched to bring the prisoner back, and he will probably be placed upon his trial at the present term of our District Court:

BISMARCK, May 24, 1875. — To Sheriff Bullock: Fred. Shaffer and company were captured here, for the murder of Franz Warl, and lodged, by the Police Court, in the County Jail, as suspicious persons. Send instructions and requisition. Answer at once.

P.M. DAVIS, Police Justice.

BISMARCK, May 25, 1875. — To Sheriff Bullock: Fred. Shaffer is in jail here. Send requisition immediately.

WM. PIERCE.

The Daily Independent (Helena, Montana) Jun 3, 1875

A Visit to the County Jail.

Yesterday afternoon the reporter availed himself of the invitation of Sheriff Bullock to take an inside look at the county jail, and found six prisoners incarcerated there, viz: Jeff. Perkins, of Benton, convicted for assault with intent to murder, and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary; Wm. Flynn and John Stout, both for grand larceny, and sentenced to two years each in the penitentiary; an insane Chinaman, awaiting the order from the Governor for admission to the Asylum. The chief object in view  was to see W.W. Wheatley and W.H. Sterres, convicted of the murder of Franz Warl, and awaiting sentence. They are kept closely locked in their cells and are very comfortable. Wheatley still protests his innocence of the blood of Warl. He claims that Sterres’ testimony, which was so damaging to him, was made in execution of the threat that both Shaffer and Sterres had made to him in case he did not leave town and should inform on them. Wheatley is certainly a weak-minded youth, and entirely devoid of principle. The reporter failed to discover the least redeeming trait in his character. It is said that the divine spark is never extinguished in man, but in his case it is very difficult to imagine it in him. He asked for the news, and as to the popular feeling regarding him, evidently indulging the hope that some degree of evidence might be given to his statement of innocence, strengthened, doubtless, by the recommendation to mercy, attached to the verdict of the jury, who found him guilty of willful and premeditated murder. He is not afraid to die; is only 25 years old; the world has many claims for him. He has a brother in Bismarck. Rev. Mr. Shippen has called twice to see him. He clings tenaciously to the hope that the sentence of death may not be executed upon him; but if he must die he has the consolation of knowing and feeling that he is guiltless of the terrible crime of murder.

William H. Sterres is entirely penitent, and has no hope that he will not be sentenced, and that it may not be carried into execution. He expects to die, and is anxious that his execution may not be long delayed. Shortly after his arrest he sent for Rev. Father Palladino, who visits him almost every day, and has supplied him with religious works to prepare him for baptism, which is to be conferred on him next Monday. Sterres has a wife and child in Sioux City. Conscious of the enormity of the crime for which he is to suffer, he is resigned to offer on the altar of justice the sacrifice of his life as the penalty of the law. The reporter left the jail a sadder man than when he entered it, impressed with the feeling that the sufferings of ta conscience burdened with such a terrible crime must be more acute than a thousand deaths.

The Daily Independent (Helena, Montana) Jun 20, 1875

Prickly Pear Creek - Photo by mmerrick

Larger photo and a map can be found on Panoramio.

On the afternoon of the 21st, while Sol Star and Seth Bullock were en route for Benton by private conveyance, and while attempting to ford the Prickly Pear, they met with an accident which nearly resulted in the loss of their lives.

It appears that when their team had reached the middle of the stream, the horses became frightened at some floating brush, and bolted down stream. Below the ford the water was deep and the current swift.

After strenuous efforts they succeeded in getting the horses and buggy out all right, but on the same side of the stream they started in from. The parties and their effects were thoroughly drenched, they retraced their way to Firgus’ ranch for repairs, and proposed to make another attempt next day.

–Herald.

Butte Miner (Butte, Montana) Jun 27, 1876

FOURTH OF JULY, 1876.

The One Hundredth National Anniversary.

Names of Officers and Order of Procession.

Officials.
William F. Wheeler, Chief Marshal of the Day in charge of the procession; Henry Wyttenbach and Charles J.D. Curtis, aids and assistants; Seth Bullock, James M. Ryan, E. Frank, L.P. Sterling, Ben R. Dittes, John O’Meara and E.T. Johnson, Assistant Marshals.

Order of Procession.

1ST DIVISION.
In charge of Henry Wyttenbach, Assistant Marshal:
Helena Silver Cornet Band.
Minute Men of 1776.

2D DIVISION.
In charge of Seth Bullock, Assistant Marshal, and the several officers of the Helena fire Department:
The several Fire Engine, Hose and Hook and Ladder companies.
Car of State, in charge of C.M. Travis and is two assistants.

3D DIVISION.
In charge of L.P. Sterling, Assistant Marshal:
Carriages for President of the Day, Chaplain, Orator, Historian, invited guests from abroad; also for Governor and other United States, Territorial and county officials.

4TH DIVISION.
In charge of James M. Ryan, Assistant Marshal:
Catholic Benevolent and Total Abstinence Society, and other societies of Irish citizens, under their society officers.

5TH DIVISION.
In charge of Dr. E. Frank, Assistant Marshal:
Helena Gesang Verein Harmonia and German citizens,
Montana Lodge No. 1 I.O.O.F., in charge of its officers.

6TH DIVISION.
In charge of Capt. John O’Meara, Assistant Marshal:
Base Ball clubs according to seniority of organization, under their respective Captains.
Boys from the schools, under charge of teachers or men appointed by the Principal of the Schools.
Mining delegations and citizens from abroad.
Citizens on foot, in carriages and on horseback.

7TH DIVISION.
In charge of E.T. Johnson, Assistant Marshal:
Colored citizens of Montana.

8TH DIVISION.
In charge of Ben R. Dittes, Assistant Marshal:
Ancient and Honorable Artillery.
Helena Commandery of Knights Templar, commanded by the Eminent Commander, T.H. Kleinschmidt.

All organizations desiring to join the procession are requested to meet at their several halls or places of rendezvous at 9 o’clock a.m., and to be on the most convenient side street, near the head of main, at precisely half past nine, ready to take their proper place in the procession as the head commences to move down Main street.

All who are not so ready will fall into the rear of the procession as it passes them.

Assistant Marshals will each be held responsible for bringing their respective divisions promptly into line.

The line of march and subsequent proceedings will take place in the published programme. The whole procession will move at 10 o’clock precisely.

W.F. WHEELER,
Chief Marshal.

The Helena Independent (Helena, Montana) Jul 2, 1876

CENTENTIAL FOURTH.

The Celebration in Helena.

The Centennial Fourth was ushered in amid the roar of artillery and the merry ringing of bells. The entire population seems to have arisen at an earlier hour than usual, in order to partake to the fullest extent in the ceremonies and rejoicings of the day.

The long procession in its march through the streets was received everywhere with waving flags and encouraging smiles.

The Helena Fire Department was very fully represented and made a very creditable appearance. The two very handsome banners which they used on this occasion for the first time, was the gift of Mrs. L.B. Wells, and the fireman may well be proud of them.

The Car of State was very handsomely decorated.

The Little Continentals attracted general admiration.

The Knights Templar formed one of the most attractive features of the procession.

The members of the Catholic Benevolent and Total Abstinence Society presented a very fine appearance in the parade.

The Continentals were greatly admired and were one of the finest features of the procession.

The colored citizens under the Marshalship of Col. E.T. Johnson, were a prominent feature.

The Gesang Verein Society was a noticeable feature, the members all wearing “chips.”

The Irish citizens turned out in large numbers and the green flag of Erin was universally complimented.

About 12 o’clock the procession reached the Court House where the reading of the Declaration of Independence, the delivery of the Oration and the reading of an address by the Historian of the Day and singing by the Gesang Verein took place.

After dark a torch-light procession moved through all the principal streets and fire-works enlivened Tower Hill.

The celebration was a perfect success and reflected credit on the Committee of Arrangements and the citizens who so generously seconded their efforts to make memorable the celebration of the Centennial birthday of the Great American Republic.

Marshal Wheeler and his efficient aids deserve great credit for the successful manner in which the parade was conducted. Many persons made the remark that Col. Charles J.D. Curtis excelled himself in his splendid horsemanship and graceful carriage.

The Helena Independent (Helena, Montana) Jul 6, 1876

Attention, Firemen.

All members of the Fire Department are requested to be at the Clore street Engine House at 2:30 p.m. to-day to attend the funeral of Thos. Ewing.

SETH BULLOCK, Chief Engineer.

The Helena Independent (Helena, Montana) Jul 6, 1876

These last two are later articles, but they refer to Seth’s time in Montana:

A Boom Town in Montana.

Helena Journal.

I call to mind the time when there was a big boom in Billings, and everybody thought they had struck the spot for a second Chicago. Before the railroad reached Billings men came from the Black Hills, where all you could hear was the great boom Billings was having, and what a lively place it was. Seth Bullock, a merchant of the Hills, sent a stock of good to Billings. In a month or two he thought he would ride over and see how his store at Billings was progressing. It was between 300 and 400 miles, and Seth went on horseback. He rode along and was pretty well tired out when he got into the Yellowstone Valley, and about 9 o’clock one night, when he thought he must have gone far enough, he met a man.

“Can you tell me where Billings is?” asked Seth.

“You’re in Billings now,” replied the stranger.

“Am, eh?” said Seth, rather puzzled.

“Well, if that’s the case can you tell me where I can find Seth Bullock’s store.”

“It’s on this street about fifteen miles from here; just keep right straight ahead.”

Seth was about the worst surprised man you ever saw, but he found it pretty near as the stranger had said.

Fort Worth Daily Gazette (Fort Worth, Texas) Jun 12, 1890

GLAD HER HUSBAND WAS HANGED.

Experience of a Montana Sheriff with the Widow.

Ex-Sheriff Seth Bullock of Lawrence county, South Dakota, one of the early Indian fighters of Montana and the Dakotas, was in a reminiscent mood and among other things he told how he was thanked for hanging a man, says the New York Sun. A murder was committed just after he had been elected sheriff, and, as no murderer had even been brought to justice up to that time in the territory Bullock became famous for having captured the first two men charged with such a crime. Said Mr. Bullock:

“I rounded up a white man and a negro who had red hair and a bad reputation. The negro was a barber from Sioux City, and he came to Montana hunting trouble.

“I had the country so well organized at that time that the courts had a chance to try these men. They were convicted and sentenced to be hanged. Taking life by order of the court was a novelty in Helena, and the people gathered by thousands to see see the hanging.

“Shortly before the hour set for the execution the marshal brought me an order from the court granting a stay of execution for thirty days in the case of the negro. I saw that the crowd would probably be disappointed, and might take exceptions to the order of the court, and I swore in a lot of deputies to stand off the trouble I expected. One of my deputies on that occasion was Sam Hauser, who was afterward elected governor of Montana.

“The white man was duly hanged, and when the crowd saw that a man hanged on a scaffold was just as dead as one lynched on a tree they demanded the negro. I had erected a high board fence around the jail and placed my deputies on the inside, and when the crowd began to scale the fence they were met by the deputies with clubs.

“There was a hot time for several minutes, but when the leaders had been clubbed into docility they concluded to let me hang the negro in my own way. There was not a shot fired, and thirty days later the negro followed his white companion on the gallows.

“Some time later I had business in Minneapolis. A good-looking, well-dressed colored woman called on me at the hotel.

“‘Be you Seth Bullock?’ she inquired. I told her I was. ‘You hanged my husband last year, and I want to thank you.’ She had been married to the man in Sioux City and he had treated her brutally.”

Omaha Daily Bee (Omaha, Nebraska) Apr 20, 1898

BattleBorn Burlesque: Celebrating the Fourth of July

July 1, 2010

Austin, Nevada - 1860s (Image from http://oak.cats.ohiou.edu)

EARLY NEVADA ORATORY.

How the old Time Austinites Celebrated

THE GLORIOUS FOURTH OF JULY.

The First “Horrible” Demonstration in the BattleBorn State.

In the early days of Austin a number of fun-loving citizens of that then flourishing camp inaugurated the custom of holding burlesque Fourth of July celebrations after the regular exercises of the day were over.

Upon this occasion Judge W.H. Beatty, now Chief Justice in California, arrayed in female apparel and representing Miss Susan B. Anthony, acted as President of the day, and Judge Boalt, the now eminent lawyer of San Francisco, read the “Declamation of Superintendents.”

The Rev. Theopalus Jenkins delivered the following oration, which was copied seriously by a number of English newspapers as a speciman of American frontier oratory and eloquence:

ORATION.

Fellow Hoodlums and Hoodlumesses, Grangers and Grangeresses, Female Crusaders and Male Persuaders, Whangdoodlers, Ore Thieves and Three-card Monte Dealers.

Governor Herny G. Blasdel

This is the proudest moment of my eventful life. when I cast my eagle eye over the sea of upturned and unwashed faces that surround me, and behold the familiar countenances of so many of my former comrades in arms who participated with me in that glorious struggle for liberty — at the last State’s prison break at Carson — the emotions of my heart are too powerful for utterance and I can only offer a silent benison to Governor Blasdel and the Pardoning Board of Nevada for tempering the wind to the shorn ram, in thus enabling us to cast our lines among the ewes and wethers of this beautifully heterogeneous and cosmopolitan metropolis of Manhattanville.

My fellow hoodlums. More than three hundred years have elapsed since our Pilgrim fathers left their mothers-in-law and all other cherished household gods behind them in the Old World that they might be enabled to worship God and burn witches and Quakers according to the dictates of their own consciences. They landed in the midst of a Siberian winter upon the inhospitable shores of New England, when there wasn’t a distillery in the country and Plymouth Rock wouldn’t pay ten dollars to the ton by the dry process with the Stetefeldt improvement. Beans and bacon were unattainable luxuries, and the Indians had a corner on pine nuts and dried grasshoppers. Times were tough and the puritanic goose was pendant at a depressed altitude.

But, did the lion hearts of our sturdy forefathers quail before this accumulated load of adversity? Nary a quail. Perseverance and religious ardor will accomplish wonders, and behold the result! To-day the potency of New England rum and New England school-marms is felt and appreciated wherever the arts and sciences are cherished and wherever civilization has a foothold. From the Georgia Major, who in the gorgeous oriental costume of his country bends the pregnant hinges of the knee before the throne of the King of Dahomey, to the civilized savage who builds his wigwam in obscurity on the populous banks of the turbulent Reese, from the everglades of Labrador to the snow-capped prairies of Texas; from the Coliseum at Rome to that modern monument of enterprise and enlightenment — the citizens’ mill at Austin; from Alfalfa to Omaha and from the Pyramids of Egypt to Simpson’s park.

My fellow hoodlums, there stands Plymouth Rock and there stands Plymouth Church — probably two of the best stands in the country. The literati of America have vied with one another in doing homage and giving to the guardian spirits of each a prominent page upon the history of our beloved country. Longfellow has immortalized in verse the blighted love of Miles Standish, while Victoria Woodhull warbles sweet refrains commemorative of the tender bonds of platonic affection which sanctify the lives of Henry Ward Beecher and Mrs. Theodore Tilton?.

But, my fellow Hoodlums, all this is digressive. We have not assembled here to-day for the purpose of doing homage to a barren boulder, but to celebrate the natal day of that great North American bird which whipped the universal game cock of creation, and caused the crown heads of Europe to shake in their boots worse than did that spermacetti duck of old, when the Apostle Paul shook his fist under his nose, and vociferated unto him, ‘Thou art the man!’

The great American Eagle that holds down the gallinacious bird of France with one claw, the double headed buzzard of Germany with the other and chaws up the British Lion into mincemeat, with the entire balance of the European menagerie roosting on his tail feathers! And yet this extraordinary bipedal cuss has not yet reached his prime of life! In a few years more he will confiscate the navies of Europe to build himself a nest, gobble the armies of the world for breakfast and afterwards use them to fertalize the soil of his ranch — which by that time will be bounded on the north by the Aurora Borealis, and on the south by the Antartic Cirle. He will turn England into a corral for his bronchos, and stable his mastodons in the Tulleries of France.

Battle Mountain (Image from http://www.biocrawler.com)

But to resume my digression. The great principles of E Plumbus Unum have never been more beautifully illustrated than in the growth and prosperity of our famous city. Here but a few short years ago the gentle Shoshone held undesputed sway. Clad in the gorgeous costume of his race, which consisted principally of an abbreviated breech clout and a couple of postage stamps — he pergrinating peacefully over his native hills, monarch of years has elapsed, since, where we now stand, no sound broke the solemn and serene stillness of the air — except the occasional yelp of the noble cayote as he stalked grandly over his native heath, dragging his majestic tail behind him. A few short years and behold the change! A city to which all the people of Lander county pay tribute. Her surrounding hillsides teeming with the fruitful sagebrush and nutritious pine nut. A city supporting three churches and thirteen fare banks, forty two gun mills and one quartz mill, and all that is wanted to make it the commercial center of the earth is a railroad from Battle Mountain or a high toned deck of hurdy-gurdies from Carson. A city whose common schools will compare favorably with those of any nation on the face of the earth. Where the standard of the moral culture of our youths have attained such an elevation, that the chances are — if they have good luck and no set backs — a majority of them will break into the penitentiary before they are twenty-one years of age.

Taking these things into consideration, my fellow hoodlums, let me admonish you, when to night, you retire to your several homes, in the hospital, the pest house and the calaboose, to firmly resolve in your minds that the fires of patriotism shall never burn dimly within you, and that you will never prove ungrateful to the country that supports such institutions for your benefit.

In conclusion, my fellow hudlums, I will remark that I am an Independent candidate for Congress, subject to the nomination of all the conventions that meet in the State. My principles are liberal, and were constructed especially to meet the emergencies of the approaching campaign. I am what might be termed and Independent Democratic Republican Granger. I am opposed to the Battle Mountain and Austin railroad — for the reason that I have generally found it more comfortable walking on state roads than on railroad ties. I am in fact opposed to all railroads, but in favor of free passes, free schools and free school marms. I believe that every woman has a constitutional right to be a school marm, and if I was on the Board of Trustees, I would vote for them all — irrespective of age, sex, color, or previous conditions of servitude.

I am opposed to the Sutro tunnel, but in favor of artesian wells — where they don’t conflict with the interests of distilleries and breweries. I am an ardent female suffragist and in favor of giving the ladies all they want and more, too, if they demand it.

I shall support Susan B. Anthony for President. She is one of the old time girls and I consider it a duty incumbent upon all forty-niners to stand in for her. Let us all stand in unitedly, and victory will purch upon her waterfall. The American eagle, from his cyrie in the mountains, will swoop down upon her, seize the slack of her pannier in his beak, and with her, wing a triumphant flight to the White House at Washington.

And now, my fellow hoodlums, for the purpose of testing the sense of this meeting, or rather for the purpose of testing whether or not this meeting has any sense, I will propose a conundrum:

All of you who are in favor of the political views I have just expressed, and are in favor of the aforesaid female and your humble servent for the respective positions I have mentioned, will manifest it by saying “Ay!” All opposed will fire off a six-shooter. It is carried unanimously, and I take great pleasure in extending to you all a cordial invitation to walk down to the Cedar street hydrant and take a drink at my expense.

Nevada State Journal (Reno, Nevada) Jul 4, 1899

Turkish Fleet Celebrates America’s Day of Independence

July 1, 2010

Maine Man in Turk Navy.

(Kennebec Journal)

The Turkish navy does not rank very high among the navies of the world, being just a little stronger than that of Switzerland, but it is interesting to note that a Maine man has just been named as its commander. The new admiral, Ransford D. Bucknam, was born in Bucksport, the picturesque old town on the Penobscot which has sent out so many good sailors during the last century.

He is only 42 years of age, and his early training was in the American merchant marine. Later he became trial captain for the American war vessels built for the Cramps, and in this capacity he commanded a vessel built at Philadelphia for the Turkish government. He took the new vessel to Constantinople, while there the sultan offered him the position of naval adviser of the Turkish navy, and from that position he has risen in a few years to be the highest officer in the Turkish service.

The story is told that two years ago on July 4, this patriotic son of Bucksport made the entire Turkish fleet celebrate the great American day of Independence. He organized games and competitions, had his band play patriotic American airs, delivered a Fourth of July oration to his sailors, and set off fireworks in the evening. Instead of a reprimand this brought praise from the sultan, who respected his patriotic sentiments and admired his spirit of independence.

San Antonio Light (San Antonio, Texas) Dec 5, 1907

Read more about Bucknam Pashna Ottoman Navy at the Mavi Boncuk blog.