Posts Tagged ‘James Buchanan’

By the Bullet and the Bowl

October 12, 2011

“By the Bullet and the Bowl.”
From the New York Tribune.

In 1840 the Whig party elected Wm. H. Harrison President. He was inaugurated in 1841, March 4th. One month afterward he died, and his office fell to John Tyler.

How “Tyler too” carried out the principles under which he was chosen, the world too well remembers. He added a new and disgraceful verb to the language — to Tylerize has ever since been synonymous with partisan treachery.

In 1844, through the efforts of the Birney Abolitionists, Henry Clay was defeated — Polk elected, with Dallas for his Vice; Texas was annexed, the area of slavery was extended by nearly 300,000 square miles, and all was lovely.

In 1848, Zachary Taylor, a moderate Whig, and Millard Fillmore, not much of anything, were chosen President and Vice. Taylor did not suit the Southern drivers; he had a stupid way of acting honestly and straightforward — and so, within a brief period, he fell under the malarious vapors of Washington, and died, Fillmore succeeding, and duly Tylerized.

Next we had the Herald’s “poor Pierce,” who has not, to this day ceased from expressing his boundless servility to the slave whips of his southern masters. He was “sound” and served out his term in peace — the water was good.

In 1856, Mr. Buchanan, fully as sound as Pierce, was raised to the Executive chair, and under his administration — as in that of his predecessor — Washington was free from malaria — that is, Democrats; but when the new Republican party began to gain strength, and it was possible that they might become the ruling power of Congress, the water of Washington suddenly grew dangerous, the hotels (particularly the National) became pest houses, and dozens of heretics from the Democratic faith grew sick almost unto death. This singular phenomenon re-appeared from time to time until the great outbreak after the election of Lincoln. Then the wells and springs of the capital came into the care of loyal soldiers, and the water persistently remained healthy. This continued, in spite of the prayers of the faithless, for four years; there was not a “sick” congressman after Davis and his followers left.

But when the struggle of 1864 was over, and the water of the capital flowed clearly, there came a change in the tactics of the poisoners; a single bullet sufficed to restore their hopes. Abraham Lincoln passed away; Andrew Johnson supervened, and — like every other President elevated to the main office, from Aaron Burr to himself — he too, Tylerized, swallowed himself with the dexterity of an East India juggler, and came out from his contortions the branded property of Howell Cobb and his crowd of unregenerated rebels. Urged by the sentiment of a betrayed people, the House of Representatives recently put the recreant Executive on trial.

The trial was over, the hour for voting approached, when we had a return of that bad water, and two or three senators — Republicans, mind you — are prostrated with sudden illness.

What does it mean?

Why does it happen that whenever the current sets against the monster demon of slavery (and never at any other time) we find the air, water, and the whisky of Washington full of poison?

Why does it happen that when some great deed for freedom is on the point of accomplishment (and never on any other occasion), we find Presidents, previously in rugged health, instantaneously sent to their graves, and traitors always on hand to take their places?

Why is it now, just as we should have the vote upon the great question of impeachment, and when — up to the latest moment — it had been universally believed that Johnson would be convicted, why, we ask, do we hear at this critical moment of the dangerous illness of some of the most firm and conspicuous advocates of impeachment?

Is there any thing of chances that can explain these remarkable Ku-klux coincidences?

Alton Daily Telegraph (Alton, Illinois) Jun 3, 1868

Genesis of the Republican Party

September 10, 2011

Image from the Tarrant County Republican Party website 

Genesis of the Republican Party.
[S.F. Bulletin.]

The States, Maine, Wisconsin and Michigan — each claims to have organized the Republican party. Perhaps Wisconsin is really entitled to the honor. On the last day of February, 1854, a meeting had been held at Ripon in that State, comprised of both Whigs and Democrats, that resolved that in the event of Congress passing the Kansas-Nebraska bill, they would fling their old affiliations to the wind, and join in a determined movement to oppose the further extension of slavery.

The first convention on this platform — which may be called the first Republican platform — convened on the 6th of July of that year, and nominated

Kinsley S. Bingham for Governor, who was elected by an overwhelming majority.

Ohio followed Michigan in the same direction, and at a State Convention nominated a ticket that swept the field.

The next year, in 1855, New Yorkers in convention abandoned their old name of “Whig” and adopted the Wisconsin name “Republican.” In other States the party of “bolters” from both the Whig and the Democratic ranks were designated as “Anti-Nebraskas.” In 1856 they met in a National Convention and nominated John C. Fremont for the Presidency, and the Republican party for the second time under that name came into existence.

Daily Nevada Journal (Reno, Nevada) Jul 16, 1884

Richland County Observer (Richland Center, Wisconsin) May 6, 1856

TO THE VOTERS OF RICHLAND COUNTY.

Having appeared before you as a candidate for the office of Clerk of the Board of Supervisors of Richland county, I deem it my duty to lay before my friends and the public generally, my position in regard to the present campaign.

For the election of President, I have but one choice, and that is for Fremont; deeming him not only to be the republican candidate, but the only true democratic candidate in the field. For him I shall labor arduously, and hope successfully. For Congress and State, as well as all law-making offices, I shall support the republican ticket throughout.

For county offices I shall endeavor to vote for those men who are the most capable to fill the offices, without regard to party nominations. Holding to the true Republican doctrine of Thomas Jefferson, viz: Are they honest, are they capable?

Respectfully yours,
WM. F. CRAWFORD.
Richland Center, August 9th, 1856.

Richland County Observer (Richland Center, Wisconsin) Aug 19, 1856

Richland County Observer (Richland Center, Wisconsin) Aug 19, 1856

THEN AND NOW.

“We intend the Constitution to be THE GREAT CHARACTER OF HUMAN LIBERTY to the unborn millions who shall enjoy its protection; and who should never see that such an institution as slavery was ever known in our midst.” — James Madison.

“Slavery exists in Kansas under the Constitution.” — James Buchanan.

The former expresses the view of the Republican party; the latter the views of the so called Democratic party.

Richland County Observer (Richland Center, Wisconsin) Nov 24, 1857