Posts Tagged ‘Journalism’

Charles A. Bonfils, Husband of Winifred Black aka “Annie Laurie”

February 11, 2009

In my previous post, “Diary of a WWI Canteen Worker,” the author of the diary excerpts mentioned Charles A. Bonfils.

This first article is just something sort of random,  but following are a few articles about his first wife, Winifred Black, who also wrote under the pen name of Annie Laurie.

Excerpt from “I Remember,” by Les Claypool, in which he writes about some premonitions he had during his life, including one regarding Charles Bonfils.

Declines Trip

In 1914 I was editor of the Kansas City Weekly Post. I was planning to take some time out soon to go to Europe with Charles A. Bonfils, editor of the Daily Post. I had made reservations and all other arrangements in so far as that was possible.

One morning, on the way to work, I had a strange feeling of depression. I had the feeling that I should not go to Europe. I told Mr. Bonfils that I was canceling out and he insisted on being told why.

“I can’t tell you why,” I replied. “I have a feeling that it would be dangerous for me to go to Europe at this time.”

Mr. Bonfils went on as he had planned. In a short time World War I broke out in Europe and it made travel in Europe a serious problem. Although he normally had adequate funds and his brother, the late F.G. Bonfils, was a millionaire, Charles was stranded in Europe and had to wait quite a while for funds and his travel plans on the continent were stymied.

Valley News (Van Nuys, California) Mar 12, 1965

This is what I found about his wives, Winifred being a rather interesting person to read about:

Winifred (Sweet) Black Bonfils

Winifred (Sweet) Black Bonfils

Winifred Black Dies in Frisco
(Assoiciated Press)

San Francisco, May 25. — Mrs. Winifred Sweet Bonfils, 73, veteran newspaper woman, who wrote under the names of Annie Laurie and Winifred Black, died at her home here Monday.

Though ill for several months Mrs. Bonfils had continued her daily newspaper columns and her friends said she died as she would have wished, “Still in the harness.”

After spending her earlier years in Chicago, New York, Washington, Massachusetts and Denver she came to San Francisco 34 years ago. She had been connected with the Hearst papers for 37 years.

Mrs. Bonfils was born in Chilton, Wis., the daughter of General Benjamin Jeffrey. She attended school in Chicago and Northhampton, Mass., and married Orlow Black in June 1892.

After his death she married Charles A. Bonfils of the Denver newspaper family.

Greeley Daily Tribune (Greeley, Colorado) May 26, 1936

winifred-black-73-journalist-dead2

Click on the above news clipping  from the  May 26, 1936, New York Times for full size to read more details about her life.

Read a 1935 TIME article about Winifred online HERE.

The TIME article mentions that Winifred and Charles had been separated for years. Evidently, he waited till she died to remarry rather than divorce?

Bonfils funeral services pending

DENVER (UPI) — Funeral arrangements were pending today for Mabel W. Bonfils, widow of a one-time assistant publisher of the Denver Post.

Mrs. Bonfils died Sunday at her home following a long illness. She was 85.

She worked in the advertising department of The Post prior to her marriage to Charles A. Bonfils in 1936.

Greeley Daily Tribune (Greeley, Colorado) Jam 20, 1976

Whangdoodle in Rhyme

February 4, 2009
A Captured Moonshine Still

A Captured Moonshine Still

The Whangdoodle.
O.J. Coffin tells, in The Charlotte Observer, the why and wherefore of the whangdoodle’s mourning:

“Oh, why do th’ whangdoodle allus mourn
Whar th’ woodbine creep an’ twine?
He worried too much ’bout how ter live
An’ too dang littul ’bout dyin’.

“Th’ whangdoodle helt a guvmint job,
Revenuer er sumpin sich like,
An’ he harried my kin like a houn-dawg uv sin —
They wuz minners chased by a pike.

“A’ter he’d sent ’em all down ter Atlanty
Fer makin’ good licker an’ white,
He had th’ teemerity, him an’ a depity,
Ter visut my still one nite.

“Oh, why do th’ whangdoodle allus mourn
An’ nash his teeth an’ whine?
He worried too much ’bout how ter live
An’ too dang littul ’bout dyin’.”

The Atlanta Constitution (Atlanta, Georgia) > 1915 > October > 20

The Charlotte Observer

The Charlotte Observer

From North Carolina Newspapers in Education website:

Portrait of a Journalist

Oscar Jackson “Skipper” Coffin (1887–1956) – As the first dean of the School of Journalism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, O. J. Coffin was something of a maverick. He preferred that the school’s professors teach from experience, not from a textbook. Coffin quoted the Bible frequently, and his determination to use proper English made him a respected journalist and teacher. [Emphasis Mine]

Before his tenure at the university, Coffin worked as a reporter for the Asheboro Courier, a sports editor for the Winston-Salem Journal, and news editor for the Charlotte Observer.