Posts Tagged ‘Kaiser Wilhelm’

The “Tea Party” and the Kaiser

March 11, 2010

For the freedom of the world. Subscribe to the National Loan at the Banque Nationale de Credit. Signed: SEM 1917

THE “TEA PARTY” AND THE KAISER

By LOUIS ALBERT LAMB.

My grandsire painted red his hide
In ancient Mohawk style,
And crept down to the Mystic side
To wait a little while.

Then other Yanks in redskin guise
Collected at the bay
And took the tea ship by surprise
And threw the tea away.

Old George the Third was much adverse
To freedom for the Yanks
His taxes were a deadly curse —
He taxed and gave no thanks.

But when the Mohawk Boston men
Dumped all the tea to port
Kind George began to think again
And arm for warlike “sport.”

He sent his Hessians over here
To kill Cap. Barker’s boys.
To burn the school and meeting house
and other such annoys;

But when they came to Bunker Hill
That jolly day in June
And Warren met ’em with a will
They piped another tune.

The Yanks have got a job today
That’s worthy of the race;
The kaiser treads a rocky way
And spars to save his face.

But all the Yanks have gone to France
En route for old Berlin;
If we buy Bonds at every chance
You bet the Yanks will win!

Our grandsires dishes King George’s will
And salted all his tea.
Our boys will do the same for Bill,
Kaiser of Germany!
The only way to push the work
And make Berlin our own,
Is this: Get busy, do not shirk
But BUY THE “FIGHTING LOAN.”

The Carroll Herald – Sep 25, 1918

The allied flags bearing down on Kaiser Wilhelm II. The Liberation Loan. By Abel Faivre 1918.

The two images in this post can be found HERE, along with several other French Posters from WWI.

SOMEWHERE IN FRANCE

By Robert Adger Bowen,
of The Vigilantes.

Somewhere in France! ‘Tis all that I may know
Of him, my hero, with the first to go
where Duty to his country’s high emprise
Called to the answering manhood in his eyes,
As calleth Deep unto the depths below.

For him there was no waiting for the slow
Uncertain summons. In his ear the blow
Of clarion sounded, ringing to the skies,
Somewhere in France.

His soul aflame with service seemed to glow
He smiled at Death, nor shrank from that grim woe
He knew full well was oft the soldier’s prize;
Nor may I grieve if so my hero dies
To sleep in fields where blood red poppies grow,
Somewhere in France.

The Nevada Daily Mail – Nov 24, 1917

BUY A BOND AND PASS IT ALONG

Tom Robinson, the plumber, bought a hundred-dollar bond,
Though he truly loved his country, of his cash he sure was fond.
“I’ve bought because it’s duty,” said he to Doctor Jones,
“I’ve got to do my little bit to help the Allied loans.”

The Doctor said: “I bought some bonds, then with them bought a car.
You owe me just a hundred.” Said the plumber: “There you are.”
And handed Jones his new-bought bond; then Jones paid off a debt
Of a hundred to the furrier — before he could forget.

The furrier had bought some clothes — an honest man was he —
“Let’s pay with Uncle Sam’s good bond that helps to set men free.”
And so he paid. The clothier squared up an old account
With his jobber — so the bond went on, intact in its amount.

The jobber owed the grocer for the things his family ate.
Said he: “I’ll pay in Libertys — you need no longer wait.”
Then the grocer paid the butcher, who owed the carpet store.
And he in turn reduced his debt and helped along the war.

“I’d like to buy a dress now,” said the carpet merchant’s wife,
“A hundred-dollar one will do — with bargains stores are rife.”
The modiste got the bond. Said she: “I know what I will do.
I’ll have the bath room fixed up fine and made to look like new.”

And so, ere long, Tom Robinson, the plumber, had his bond,
And no one in the country will be quicker to respond,
when Uncle Sam’s next loan appears. The moral of this tale
Is Buy a Bond and Pass It On — our country cannot fail.

— By Richard A. Foley, of Philadelphia

Reading Eagle – Dec 9, 1917

LIBERTY BONDS.

(At the outbreak of the civil war in 1861, the government offered a loan to the public to provide funds for carrying on the war. This poem was written at that time by one of our great authors and it is equally appropriate now when the government loan in  the form of Liberty bonds is offered to the public. It is well also to remember that the bonds afterwards rose to command a premium.)
Come, freemen of the land,
Come, meet the great demand.
True heart and open hand,
Take the loan!
For the hopes the prophets saw,
For the swords your brothers draw,
For liberty and law,
Take the loan!

Ye ladies of the land,
As ye love the gallant band,
Who have drawn a soldier’s brand,
Take the loan!
Who would bring them what she could,
Who would give the soldier food.
Who would staunch her brother’s blood.
Take the loan!

All who saw her hosts pass by,
All who joined the parting cry,
When we bade them do or die,
Take the loan!
As ye wished their triumph then,
As ye hope to meet again,
And to meet their gaze as men,
Take the loan!

Who could press the great appeal
Of our ranks of serried steel,
Put your shoulders to the wheel,
Take the loan!
That our prayers in truth may rise,
Which we press with streaming eyes
On the Lord of earth and skies,
Take the loan!

-Edward Everett Hale.

The Daily Northwestern (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) May 30,  1917