Posts Tagged ‘Liberty Bonds’

Mary Miles Minter: Waving the Tomahawk and Dancing the War Dance

March 11, 2010

WHY I BUY LIBERTY BONDS

As Told By

MARY MILES MINTER

To Send Bullets to Huns.

I guess I’m a bit emotional or temperamental on this subject of Liberty Bonds and my reasons for buying them, and generally get worked up mightily over it. When it comes to any subject touching upon the protection of American or American ideals or dealing with the atrocities of the Germans I just can’t help waving the tomahawk and dancing the war dance a few measures.

I buy Liberty Bonds because the government won’t sell me a cannon and let me take it across to Germany and use it myself on those nasty baby-killers. If they’d let me do that, I wouldn’t buy a Liberty Bond because a Liberty Bond means that I’ll get my money back some day with interest on it and the way I fell about it, I don’t want anything back that I can send to the Germans! They’re welcome to all I’ve got in the shape of shells and bullets, but since a girl is not allowed to do this then I must do the next best thing and make it possible for someone else to take the cannon and the bullets over there.

Honestly, my reason for buying every bond I can stagger under is not because they are the best investments in the world, because they have all the safety of hte greatest security behind them or because they pay good interest and are free from most forms of taxation (which is reason enough, goodness knows, for the fellow who squeezes the dollar) but I buy them because I have a mother and a sister and a grandmother; I buy them because I know a little year-old baby that lives next door; I buy them because I have a sw–(but that’s nobody’s business) and everytime I look at them I say, “Just because your’re mine and I love you doesn’t make you  any different before God from the mothers and sister and grandmothers and babies and –” you know, everything that lived in Belgium and France when the war started, and every time I look into their eyes, I can imagine that it wasn’t Belgium at all that was raided, but America, and I can see those blood-soaked Germans doing to my people what they did to others and I — but there, there, I’m getting excited. All the same, I feel that if it hadn’t been for those poor people who were sacrificed it might have been my own people — that even yet if the Germans aren’t wiped off the face of the earth there is still a chance of its being my people — my people — the people I know and love and live with, and I see red!

I’m a baseball fan. Aren’t you? Ever since I was knee high to a duck and ran away from home and played with the boys on the vacant lots I have loved baseball. We used to buy bats for a quarter each — not very good bats — but good enough. I remember I had a sweetheart then who was the best batter inthe lot. I bought him a bat — he hit the ball with it so hard that it broke my nice shiny red club and I cried but he knocked the ball so far we made four home-runs in a row and I was so happy I kissed him even while I cried over the bat. I often wish I could buy baseball bats instead of bonds and hit the Germans with them so hard I’d break every bat over their heads and drive them clear off the lot. Somebody told me that every quarter now-a-days paid for five bullets. That’s the real reason I buy bonds.

The Pittsburgh Press – Oct 3, 1918

City of Orange, CA (Image from http://www.cityoforange.org)

From the City of Orange website:

At the time of World War I, Orange residents supported the war effort with many Liberty Bond rallies. One of the bond parades at the Plaza was filmed and featured the movie star Mary Miles Minter, the war tank “Victory” and Company 76. A Peace Parade and Program for returning soldiers and sailors was held on Christmas Day 1918 in the Plaza.

Taylor and Minter (Image from http://www.classichollywoodbios.com)

Cold Case Crimes Los Angeles has an interesting piece regarding the murder of William Desmond Taylor.  Evidently, Mary Miles Minter had  a relationship with him at one time. You can read  the theories of “who done it”  at this LINK.

The “Tea Party” and the Kaiser

March 11, 2010

For the freedom of the world. Subscribe to the National Loan at the Banque Nationale de Credit. Signed: SEM 1917

THE “TEA PARTY” AND THE KAISER

By LOUIS ALBERT LAMB.

My grandsire painted red his hide
In ancient Mohawk style,
And crept down to the Mystic side
To wait a little while.

Then other Yanks in redskin guise
Collected at the bay
And took the tea ship by surprise
And threw the tea away.

Old George the Third was much adverse
To freedom for the Yanks
His taxes were a deadly curse —
He taxed and gave no thanks.

But when the Mohawk Boston men
Dumped all the tea to port
Kind George began to think again
And arm for warlike “sport.”

He sent his Hessians over here
To kill Cap. Barker’s boys.
To burn the school and meeting house
and other such annoys;

But when they came to Bunker Hill
That jolly day in June
And Warren met ’em with a will
They piped another tune.

The Yanks have got a job today
That’s worthy of the race;
The kaiser treads a rocky way
And spars to save his face.

But all the Yanks have gone to France
En route for old Berlin;
If we buy Bonds at every chance
You bet the Yanks will win!

Our grandsires dishes King George’s will
And salted all his tea.
Our boys will do the same for Bill,
Kaiser of Germany!
The only way to push the work
And make Berlin our own,
Is this: Get busy, do not shirk
But BUY THE “FIGHTING LOAN.”

The Carroll Herald – Sep 25, 1918

The allied flags bearing down on Kaiser Wilhelm II. The Liberation Loan. By Abel Faivre 1918.

The two images in this post can be found HERE, along with several other French Posters from WWI.

SOMEWHERE IN FRANCE

By Robert Adger Bowen,
of The Vigilantes.

Somewhere in France! ‘Tis all that I may know
Of him, my hero, with the first to go
where Duty to his country’s high emprise
Called to the answering manhood in his eyes,
As calleth Deep unto the depths below.

For him there was no waiting for the slow
Uncertain summons. In his ear the blow
Of clarion sounded, ringing to the skies,
Somewhere in France.

His soul aflame with service seemed to glow
He smiled at Death, nor shrank from that grim woe
He knew full well was oft the soldier’s prize;
Nor may I grieve if so my hero dies
To sleep in fields where blood red poppies grow,
Somewhere in France.

The Nevada Daily Mail – Nov 24, 1917

BUY A BOND AND PASS IT ALONG

Tom Robinson, the plumber, bought a hundred-dollar bond,
Though he truly loved his country, of his cash he sure was fond.
“I’ve bought because it’s duty,” said he to Doctor Jones,
“I’ve got to do my little bit to help the Allied loans.”

The Doctor said: “I bought some bonds, then with them bought a car.
You owe me just a hundred.” Said the plumber: “There you are.”
And handed Jones his new-bought bond; then Jones paid off a debt
Of a hundred to the furrier — before he could forget.

The furrier had bought some clothes — an honest man was he —
“Let’s pay with Uncle Sam’s good bond that helps to set men free.”
And so he paid. The clothier squared up an old account
With his jobber — so the bond went on, intact in its amount.

The jobber owed the grocer for the things his family ate.
Said he: “I’ll pay in Libertys — you need no longer wait.”
Then the grocer paid the butcher, who owed the carpet store.
And he in turn reduced his debt and helped along the war.

“I’d like to buy a dress now,” said the carpet merchant’s wife,
“A hundred-dollar one will do — with bargains stores are rife.”
The modiste got the bond. Said she: “I know what I will do.
I’ll have the bath room fixed up fine and made to look like new.”

And so, ere long, Tom Robinson, the plumber, had his bond,
And no one in the country will be quicker to respond,
when Uncle Sam’s next loan appears. The moral of this tale
Is Buy a Bond and Pass It On — our country cannot fail.

— By Richard A. Foley, of Philadelphia

Reading Eagle – Dec 9, 1917

LIBERTY BONDS.

(At the outbreak of the civil war in 1861, the government offered a loan to the public to provide funds for carrying on the war. This poem was written at that time by one of our great authors and it is equally appropriate now when the government loan in  the form of Liberty bonds is offered to the public. It is well also to remember that the bonds afterwards rose to command a premium.)
Come, freemen of the land,
Come, meet the great demand.
True heart and open hand,
Take the loan!
For the hopes the prophets saw,
For the swords your brothers draw,
For liberty and law,
Take the loan!

Ye ladies of the land,
As ye love the gallant band,
Who have drawn a soldier’s brand,
Take the loan!
Who would bring them what she could,
Who would give the soldier food.
Who would staunch her brother’s blood.
Take the loan!

All who saw her hosts pass by,
All who joined the parting cry,
When we bade them do or die,
Take the loan!
As ye wished their triumph then,
As ye hope to meet again,
And to meet their gaze as men,
Take the loan!

Who could press the great appeal
Of our ranks of serried steel,
Put your shoulders to the wheel,
Take the loan!
That our prayers in truth may rise,
Which we press with streaming eyes
On the Lord of earth and skies,
Take the loan!

-Edward Everett Hale.

The Daily Northwestern (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) May 30,  1917

I Wonder if the Kaiser’s Sleep is Sound

March 9, 2010

THE WAR LORD’S REST.

By Berton Braley.

I wonder if the kaiser’s sleep is sound,
Or if in dreams that startle him awake
He hears dead voices issue from the ground
and sees the ghosts of fallen hosts that shake
Their grisly fists before his staring eyes;
I wonder if about the imperial bed
He does not feel a force malignant rise
— The living curses of the murdered dead!

I wonder if the kaiser’s sleep is sound,
Or if in eerie stretches of the night,
He faces God in terrible affright.
The God he has blasphemed, the God he crowned
With Prussian bays for Prussian deeds of hate!
I wonder if he finds true rest in sleep
While little children moan and women weep
Because his lust for empire waxed too great!

He drew the sword and drenched the world in blood
He plunged mankind in agony profound;
I wonder if, amid this crimson flood,
The kaiser’s sleep is sound!

The Pittsburgh Press – Jun 13, 1917

DECEMBER.

Now ends the year that well began
In peace, upon the First of Jan.
Do You recall those days of Feb.
And now that it begins to ebb,
When submarines arose to bar
The way to peace? The month of Mar.,
When war upreared its grisly shape,
Or Wilson’s burning words, in Ap.?
That epoch seems so far away —
The martial song that rose in May,
The marching feet, the fifer’s tune,
The loan we made our land in June;
The men that went again to school
To learn the art of war, in Jul.;
The fight upon the Profit Hog
That waxed so hot in days of Aug.;
The crops that ripened as we slept,
And blessed us in the month of Sept.,
The Germans, so surprised and shocked
To find our boys across, in Oct.;
The coin we gave, the clothes we wove,
The sox we knitted, all through Nov.;
We’ve struck some mighty blows for Peace
Within the year that ends this Dec.!

–Ted Robinson in Cleveland Plain Dealer.

The Daily Times – Dec 11, 1917

“Can You Lend Me Fifty Dollars?” says my Uncle Sam to me.

March 8, 2010

COMING ACROSS

By EZRA WEED.

“Can you lend me fifty dollars?” says my Uncle Sam to me.
“Well, Uncle, I don’t know,” I says, “I’ll have to go and see.”
“You’ll have to go and see?” he says, sarcastical and dry.
and I didn’t feel too cheerful when I looked him in the eye.

“Now, son, you listen here,” he says, “I’ll give it to you straight.
I know, — you’re in a hurry. Better let the hurry wait.
There’s things I’m going to tell you,– or try to, anyhow.
If you never done much thinkin’, you better do some now.

“I brought you up in freedom, I allowed you’d have the run
Of the fairest, finest country that ever got the sun.
I gave you school and readin’ as much as you could learn,
And never asked an hour of your service in return.

“You had it soft and easy; you didn’t have to fight;
And you looked on peace and plenty as if they was your right.
‘I took a chance to raise you,’ I said, ‘he won’t forget.
Some day he’ll do me credit.’ And this is what I get.

“I ask a little favor that you can do for me, —
So small I hate to ask it, — and, you’ve got to go and see!
I’ve strove with men and angels for the honor of our name, —
To make it stand for somethin’, and keep it clean of shame.

“I always planned to give you a country and a flag
You could call as good as any, and you wouldn’t have to brag.
If you figure so to keep them, I only know one plan
That’ll stand all kinds of acids, and that’s to be a man.

“So you better think it over and show what you can do.
I can use about a billion. So long. It’s up to you.”
Now I guess, unless I’m willing to be charged up as a loss
And thrown into the discard, I’ll have to come across.

The Carroll Herald – Oct 24, 1917

The Carroll Herald - Oct 24, 1917

Now, All Together.

By Grantland Rice.

Would you like to kick in on the world’s greatest cinch?
Would you like to belong when the cheering rolls in?
Would you care to deliver a punch in the pinch
That will help out a game which your country must win?
Would you like to be known as a quitter, or worse?
Or have you a vision of triumph beyond?
Would you like to help wipe out the Prussianized curse?
Then go out and dig for a Liberty bond.

We have come to the break in the world’s greatest game —
The rally is on that was long overdue,
And the score that shall wait at the end of the frame
Is up to the fellow at bat — meaning YOU.
The battle is on where a few lusty drives
Will clear up the future which waits on beyond.
Would you like to belong when the BIG DAY arrives?
Then go out and dig for a Liberty bond.

The Carroll Herald – Oct 24, 1917

BUY A BOND.

By Berton Braley.

If you hate oppression and lust and shame
If you hate the fiend with his eyes aflame,
If you burn with wrath at the word and deed
Of a crew of pirates whose only creed
Is the law of might and the rule of force
And death to all who oppose their course;
If an anger terrible scars your brain
At children murdered and women slain,
At crimsoned seas and at blackened sod
All done in the name of a Prussian God;
If you hate these things and you cannot go
To fight the cruel and ruthless foe
You CAN be loyal, you CAN respond
You CAN come forward and “BUY A BOND!”

If you love your country, your home, your flag,
If you would not witness that banner drag
In the dust of failure; if still you care
For what is lovely and true and fair;
If freedom isn’t an empty word
But a thing you love; if your heart is stirred
By though of a world made safe and free
For the sake of common humanity;
If these things seem worth while to you,
This is the service taht you can do.
Though you may not battle “across the pond,”
You CAN save money and “BUY A BOND!”

The Pittsburgh Press – Oct 10, 1917