Posts Tagged ‘National Debt’

The Cost of Whisky

June 7, 2012

Image from the National Library of Ireland Blog

The Cost of Whisky.

The revenue statistics show some striking particulars as to the follies and extravagance of the public. The national debt contracted during a prodigious war, and with one-half the territory of the Union in the hands of the enemy, after deducting what has been redeemed, reaches the sum of $2,600,000,000; and the Democracy, to suppress whose rebellion this whole debt was incurred, are greatly concerned lest the people should forget how oppressively that debt bears upon them. We have shown in a former article that, within the three years which followed the close of the war, the share of the debt falling to each head of the population has decreased from eighty to sixty-five dollars, and that in 1870 it will be reduced to sixty-three per head without the payment of any portion of the principal.

In the meantime, the annual taxation has been reduced two hundred millions, and farther reductions will follow. We invite the attention of these declaimers against the “enormous burden” of the national debt, to the statement of the Special Commissioner of the Revenue, Mr. Welles, as to the retail sales of spirituous liquors, wines, ale and beer, in the United States during the last year. We do not refer to the sales of wholesale, but to those at retail, sworn to by the retailers, who have paid the license tax on their sales. We give the table by States, and the figures represent the amount paid by the drinkers and consumers to the retailers over the counter:

Thus it will be seen that during the fiscal year of 1866-67, the people of the United States paid for strong drinks over the counter to retail dealers, the sum of fourteen hundred and eighty-three millions four hundred and ninety-one thousand and eight hundred and sixty-five dollars. —

That sum is more than equal to one-half the principal, and the annual interest of the public debt. That sum if applied to the payment of the debt, would redeem it all in gold in two years. The amount of money paid by actual consumers for this strong drink in three years, would equal the entire debt of the Union, of all the States, and of all the cities, counties and towns of the United States. — [Chicago Tribune.]

The Hillsdale Standard (Hillsdale, Michigan) Jun 9, 1868

U.S. Debt, Taxes and Timber

April 11, 2012

Let Us Consider for a Moment, the U.S.Public Debt…

The Daily News (Huntingdon, Pennsylvania) Jun 22, 1937

Heavy, Heavy Hangs the Possibility of New Taxation

The Daily News (Huntingdon, Pennsylvania) Jun 22, 1935

In the Woods — Presidential Timber

The Daily News (Huntingdon, Pennsylvania) Apr 10, 1935

Taxes: Jokes and Quotes

May 18, 2009

taxes go up 19361933 cartoon, not 1936

“If it is not excessive,” he declared, “a national debt will be to us a national blessing.”

Stuff  Alexander Hamilton said, according to author John F. Gordon.

squiggle

A NATIONAL DEBT A NATIONAL BLESSING. —

Jay Cooke vs. British Parliament. — During a late debate in the British Parliament a member stated that in England and Wales alone there were a million of paupers, and five hundred more on the verge of pauperism. The heavy national debt and the high taxes necessary to meet the interest upon it were assigned as the cause.

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) Sep 9, 1865

Image from Print Source Info

Image from Print Source Info

Printing press fell seven floors in Chicago. Perhaps it was printing something favoring high taxes.

The Gettysburg Times (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Dec 17, 1923

Rats in the House That Jack Built

January 20, 2009
Rat in the House that Jack Built

Rat in the House that Jack Built

Rats!
The Arkansas delegation in Congress are singular fellows — singular, because Van Buren member of Congress, and yet quite honest. We have already amused our readers by sundry extracts from the blunt denunciations of the corruptions of the party to which they belong, which have fallen from the lips of Senator Sevier and Representative Yell. — The latter gentleman has been again applying the lash to his delinquent friends. Some proposition of the party being before the House, proposing the expenditure of several hundred thousand dollars, Mr. Yell broke out into the following exclamation, “is this the time,” said he, “for us to think of useless taxation, and useless expenditure? What is our condition? AN EMPTY TREASURY — A NATIONAL DEBT — A VILIFIED CREDIT!” Verily, here is a yell for you! The picture of the national degradation brought upon the country by the empiricism of Van Buren, is drawn with a pencil light! But hear Yell yet a while longer. Hear him describe his fellows of the House — the real Simon Pure hard-money-Loco-foco-Democratic-people-loving-money-hating, “cats and rats” of Van Burenism and their masters, who have kept them sleek and plump by good feeding!

cock-in-the-house-that-jack-built

“Mr. Speaker, it is not to be denied that there are in this House cats and rats — I certainly do not intend to offer any term reproach or discourtesy to any gentleman, when I make use of such epithets — who have for years been struggling, and often with too much success, to clutch the malt, and carry it away from the House that Jack built. The fact has been known to all — the late and present Executive have both been aware of the fact — and if I have any language of censure or of reproach to add, it must be found in a well grounded complaint that they have not drawn the offending rats from their hiding places, dismissed them from their confidence, and held them up to public reprobation.” — Journal and Register.

Huron Reflector (Norwalk, Ohio) July 17, 1838

The House That Jack Built

Other Political Uses From Wikipedia:

  • Thomas Jefferson, prior to serving as President, first used it to criticize the broad construction approach of the “necessary and proper” clause of the U.S. Constitution with respect to a bill to grant a federal charter to a mining company. The term was used to suggest that the expansion of federal powers under these arguments would give the federal government infinite powers. “Congress are authorized to defend the nation. Ships are necessary for defense; copper is necessary for ships; mines, necessary for copper; a company necessary to work the mines; and who can doubt this reasoning who has ever played at ‘This is the House that Jack Built’? Under such a process of filiation of necessities the sweeping clause makes clean work.”
  • One of the “Political Miscellanies” associated with the Rolliad, an 18th century British satire, was “This Is the House That George Built”, referring to George Nugent Grenville, Marquess of Buckingham, who had briefly supported William Pitt the Younger into government before resigning from office. The parody is attributed to Joseph Richardson.