Posts Tagged ‘Obituary’

Gareth to Lynette

December 6, 2012

arthur hughes - inspired by Tennyson's Gareth and Lynette

Image from ARTMAGICK

Poem in College Magazine.

The following poem which appeared in the University of Virginia Magazine, published by the students, was written by L. Travis White, of Frederick, who is studying law at the institution:

Gareth to Lynette.

Then Gareth: “Here be rules. I know but one —
To dash against mine enemy and to win.” — Tennyson.

More soft than silken strands the hair
That tumbles round thy temples fair,
Tossed by the summer air;
Like roses bloom thy cheeks;
The droning bee they near deceive,
When proffered sweetness to receive
Some brim-full flower he seeks.

Thine eyes, like twin stars on the deep,
Soft-mirrored when the billows sleeps
And moaning winds their silence keep,
Shine tenderly; yet seem
They like the dewdrops when the lawn
Gem-strewn, doth greet the Sun of dawn —
And mockingly they gleam.

Near thee the lark on tireless wing
Hovers his sweetest song to sing;
To thee the zephyrs tribute bring,
With violent-laden breath.
The buds whose fragrance is most sweet
Are gladly crushed beneath thy feet —
Thrice blest in such a death.

But thy heart is as hard to lover’s pain
Like the rocks beside the storm-swept main —
Against them dash, in vain, in vain,
The waves of a passionate sea;
Yet slow to ocean yields the land,
The proud rocks crumble into sand —
So will I conquer thee!

— L. Travis White.

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 4, 1912

L Travis White - Class of 1911 - Frederick MD - The Frederick Post MD 15 Dec 1971

L. Travis White is number 4 in the picture above.

Frederick High School’s Class of 1911 is once again part of the scene at the local school, at least in the form of the official class photograph presented to the school recently by Robert J. DiDomenico, executive director of Goodwill Industries of Monocacy Valley Inc.

The full story of where the old fashioned studio picture spent the last 60 years will probably never be known, although it can easily be visualized gracing the living room of some proud graduate’s home.

Whatever its history, the picture complete with handsome frame and glass, turned up as part of an anonymous donation to Goodwill and was spotted by Mrs. Barbara Coulter, secretary to DiDomenico, who recognized it as an interesting bit of memorabilia for the school.

DiDomenico agreed that this was a fitting disposition for the photograph and it was presented to George Seaton, principal of Frederick High School.

The picture, taken in the era of the old Boys High School, now Elm Street Elementary School, reveals several points of contrast with more recent high school class photos. Most obvious, of course, is the fact that the class is composed of only 19 members, all boys.

It is also interesting to note that the students are pictured in a West Point type military uniform, an indication of the schools’ past presently reflected only in the nickname “Cadets,” used by Frederick High athletic teams.

The students’ haircuts, on the other hand, are a bit on the full side with moderate sideburns not too different from today’s more conservative styles.

Most familiar, however, are the surnames, most of which are still prominently represented in Frederick County today. No effort has been made to tell how many members of the class survived, but Principal Seaton would be pleased to hear from any who might still live in the area.

Names of those identified in the Smith Studio (of Frederick) photograph include: Clyde E. Burgee, Allen G. Quynn, Earl E. Zeigler, L. Ray Burgee, Louis A. Rice, James R. Keller, J. Ernest Haifleigh, R. Dorsey Sappington, Willis D. Witter, George L. Rothenhoefer, Dean W. Hendrickson, David L. Johnson, William H. Solt, Marvin L. Shirley, Prof. Amon Burgee, Edgar J. Eyler, J. Roger Fisher, L. Travis White, John L. Shaw and J.F. Minor Simpson.

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 15, 1971

L Travis White - Scholarship - The News - Frederick MD 06 Jun 1912

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Jun 6, 1912

L Travis White - Scholarship - The News - Frederick MD 20 Jun 1914

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Jun 20, 1914

Travis White El Paso - Caribel and Roxanna visit - The Frederick Post MD 11 Apr 1931

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Apr 11, 1931

L Travis White - Odd Tricks - Bridge book cover

Image from Gamblers Book Club

From Bridge Guys – Bridge Books:

White, Littleton Travis – (July 3, 1894 – December 1973) – Littleton Travis White

Odd Tricks, c1934, Edited by Albert H. Morehead and Clifford A. Bender, Publisher: The Bridge World, Inc., New York City, United States; also Odd Tricks, 1978, Edited by Albert H. Morehead and Clifford A. Bender, Publisher: GBC Press, Las Vegas, United States, ISBN-10: 0896508102; also Odd Tricks, 1983, Edited by Albert H. Morehead and Clifford A. Bender, Publisher: Casino Press, ISBN-10: 0870190334 / ISBN-13: 9780870190339, LC: 34041970

Note: Mr. Paul Ryan has contributed this information in addition to a scanned version of the newspaper article in the El Paso Herald Post upon the publication of the bridge book. This information is included in a .pdf file for the interest of the bridge visitor and, in addition, a visually more acceptable version, also in a .pdf file format. Mr. Paul Ryan has also included the scanned version of the World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, of Littleton Travis White and also the scanned information collected during the 1930 United States Federal Census. Also include is the Social Security

*     *     *     *     *

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
The Work Done By The Just Government League:

[excerpt – L. Travis White’s mother was involved in women’s suffrage movement]

L Travis White - Mrs John Kearnes White - Suffragette - The News - Frederick MD 15 Dec 1915

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 15, 1915

Littleton Travis White - Roxanna's Party - The News - Frederick MD 17 Dec 1901

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 17, 1901

*     *     *

Evidently, his sister was a bit of an artist:

Roxanna White - Charcoal Drawing - The Frederick Post MD 15 Oct 1917

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Oct 15, 1917

Campus map, St. John's College (MD)

Image from HCAP

L. Travis White’s sister, Roxanna, married the president of St. John’s College. What I found interesting were his comments to the Rotary Club about the educational revolution, and St. John’s “counter-revolution”:

COLLEGE HEAD TALKS TO CLUB

St. John’s System Explained To Rotarians By President

Educational counter-revolution by St. John’s College, Annapolis, shared discussion with the shortage of Maryland oysters as topics of discussion before the Wednesday luncheon meeting of the Frederick Rotary Club.

Dr. John Spangler Kieffer, president of St. John’s College and also of Annapolis’ Rotary, described the 100-book foundation of knowledge system inaugurated by the school in 1937.

W.R. Slemmer, chairman of the local Rotarians’ committee for an oyster-roast to be held later this month, changed the after-dinner talk of members from the day’s topic of  “Education in Revolution”, to “will we be able to get oysters to roast?”, when he refused to continue sale of tickets for the proposed affair, until weather conditions and the bivalve market assures delivery of the food.

Introduced by his uncle, Rev. Henri L.G. Kieffer, the speaker of the meeting explained St. John’s College new system as anomalous, in that it is designed to maintain the “aura of college aristocracy, with democratic ideals.”

The highly honored Harvard graduate was made president of the Annapolis college last year, succeeding Stringfellow Barr in continuing the “nationally observed new-trend for education, started in 1937.” President Kieffer’s wife, the former Miss Roxanna White, is a native of Frederick.

Called Revolutionary

Dr. Kieffer explained that the St. John’s program is actually a revolution against the nineteenth-century revolution in education. That classical education of the past hundred years was not the complete fundamental knowledge necessary to developments of laboratory sciences and that elective courses were a compromise which undergraduates are not capable of choosing.

He deplored over-specialization in teaching undergraduates and summed up the program of his college system, as one intended to complete adolescence of students by training the mind to think generally and adultly; thereby being acquainted with the “principles” of the civilization in which he will live.

“We are living through a revolutionary period, as evidenced by the present loss of standards, faith and belief in things,” Dr. Kieffer said, “There is skepticism, dogmatism, on every hand. There is a general lack of knowledge and faith in fundamentals. We have lost the stability of the nineteenth century minds, because the atomic bomb disproved Maxwell’s system of physics,” the speaker concluded.

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Feb 12, 1948

*     *     *     *     *

Interesting “men vs. women” note in this article excerpt:

PARTY FOLLOWS FINAL SEMINAR

Mr. And Mrs. Kieffer Are Honored By Group At Library

Women may control the wealth of the country as statistics indicate, but it was the men who defended its economic system as opposed to the Communist theory in a lively final session of the Great Books Seminar in the C. Burr Arts Library, May 2 during the discussion of the Communist Manifesto. John S. Kieffer, director of adult education at St. John’s College, Annapolis, who has been conducting the Seminar, presented. The session concluded with a party given by Between-the Book-Ends Club in honor of Mr and Mrs. Kieffer….

Kieffer - Book Seminar - The Frederick Post MD 12 May 1952

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) May 12, 1952

*     * Census Records *     *

John Kearnes White, the father, doesn’t every appear to be with the family:

Littleton Travis White - 1900 census - Frederick MD

1900 Federal Census – Frederick, MD

Travis White - 1910 census - Frederick MD

1910 Federal Census – Frederick, MD

In 1920, Mrs. White and Roxanna are still living in Frederick, MD, sans father, and Littleton Travis White is a roomer in Virginia, practicing law.

*     *     *

By 1940, Littleton Travis White was finally married, and to quite the YOUNG lady:

Travis White - 1940 census - El Paso TX

Living in El Paso, Texas, with his mother-in-law, young wife, and baby daughter.

*     *     *     *     *

According to his mother’s obituary, she was a member of the United Daughters of the Confederacy:

Caribel Travis White - Obituary - The Frederick Post MD 30 Apr 1954

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Apr 30, 1954

John Kearnes White - The White Rose

Travis’s father appears to have authored a book of poetry. The interesting part is the dedication:

John Kearnes White - to my mother

To My Mother, not My Wife.

HATHI TRUST Digital Library has the book online: THE WHITE ROSE

*     *     *     *     *

Littleton Travis White died in Annapolis, Maryland, while visiting his sister:

Travis White - Obituary - El Paso Herald-Post TX 08 Dec 1973

His death was front page news in the El Paso Herald-Post (El Paso, Texas) Dec 8, 1973

The End

All this for a poem!

You Can’t Forget a Garden, But Can You Forget a Poet?

July 1, 2012

Image from Alfredo Rodriguez

YOU CAN’T FORGET A GARDEN

You can’t forget a garden
When you have planted a seed —
When you have watched the weather
And know a rose’s need.
When you go away from it,
However long or far,
You leave your heart behind you
Where roots and tendrils are.

Louise Driscoll, in “Garden Grace.”

Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jun 11, 1932

Louise Driscoll To Speak at Normandie

Garden lovers will have an opportunity to indulge themselves, in imagination, in the delights of their hobby, despite Winter’s barricade against outdoor participation, when Louise Driscoll speaks on Thursday, February 20, in the ballroom of the Normandie, No. 253 Alexander Street.

Miss Driscoll will have as her theme that evening “A Garden Thru the Year.” Author of “Garden Grace” and “Garden of the West,” she will bring the spirit of all gardens to her listeners, as in her poem, “Lost Garden,” from “Garden Grace.”

Guest of Mrs. Forbes

Miss Driscoll will be the guest of Mrs. George M. Forbes of Alexander Street, president of the Rochester Poetry Society, under whose auspices she will speak.

Rochester Journal (Rochester, New York) Feb 13, 1936

ON BEING A NEWSMAN IN PASADENA

I have long said one of the delightful aspects of being a newsman in Pasadena is that — no matter on what subject you write — you may rest assured that among the thousands of persons reading your stuff will be at least one of the world’s greatest authorities on that subject.

It never fails.

Some of the most valued acquaintances I have picked up over the years have developed this way. You do a “masterpiece.” Next day the phone rings, or there’s a letter on your desk. You were right, and you know it. Or you were wrong, and you’ve picked up a world of understanding.

*          *          *

On my desk this morning was a letter of a different type — illustrating the point I am making in another way.

It was in response to a column I wrote way last spring, forgot, and then published late because I still thought it was a good column. I called it, IN WHICH I GROW SENTIMENTAL. It was built around re-discovery of this poem, which, half forgotten from my boyhood days, nonetheless had carried me through many tight places.

Here’s the letter I found on my desk.

L.M. — I was very much interested and pleased to see, in your column, a quotation from a poem by Louise Driscoll.

Louise — who died some years ago — way my cousin.

She was for many years, head of the library of Catskill, New York, and was a poet of quite considerable reputation. In the days when poetry, to be publishable, did not have to be (a) an imitation of the New Yorker, or (b) something just long enough to fill that annoying gap at the end of a magazine page.

Her poems were published in many magazines in the 1920s and thereabouts, and appear in several anthologies. She published one book of collected verse, so far as I know; a small book of very charming and rather haunting poems, under the title “Garden Grace.”

I am sure it would have made her very happy to know that one of her poems was remembered.

Very sincerely,

Marjorie C. Driscoll,

Altadena.

See what I mean about the delightful aspects of being a newsman in Pasadena?

*          *          *

SENTIMENT HAS A PLACE IN OUR BEING

Star-News (Pasadena, California) Jun 9, 1959

 

Distinction for Local Women

New York, Sept. 26 (Special). —

Three Kingston women, seven residents of Woodstock, one Palenville and one Catskill woman are members of a group of outstanding women of the nation selected for inclusion in “American Women,” a who’s who of the feminine world just completed and published.

The honor was attained locally by Mary E.S. Fischer, illustrator, Melvina E. Moore-Parsons, and the late Mary Gage-Day, physicians of Kingston, Mrs. J. Courtenay Anderson, Agnes M. Daulton, Harriet Gaylord and Louise S. Hasbrouck, writers, Nancy Schoonmaker, lecturer, Lily Strickland, composer, and Mrs. Bruno L. Zimm of Woodstock, Jennie Brownscombe, artist, of Palenville, and Louise Driscoll, librarian, of Catskill.

New York state has contributed 1,096 of the 6,214 women chosen for the distinction of places on the list. Eighty-two per cent attended college and the majority are active in clubs and organizations. The possibility of success for a career and marriage combination receives strong endorsement from the fact that 41 per cent of the roster are married.

Approximately a third of the list, in true feminine fashion, declined to state their age. Writers formed the largest class, numbering 800, and professors the second with 355. Four each are engaged in aviation and astronomy, five in engineering and thirteen in the ministry. Gardening is the most popular hobby. Only sixty-four like to play bridge and one goes in for hunting mushrooms.

Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York) Sep 27, 1935

Louise won an award for this one:

Title: Poems of the Great War
Editor: John William Cunliffe
Publisher: The Macmillan Company, 1917
“The Metal Checks”
Pages 78-83

Her Father:

Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York) Jan 3, 1941

Services Tonight For Mr. Driscoll, Dean of Masons
—–
Native of Rockland County, 103, Died Yesterday in Catskill
—–

CATSKILL — Masonic services will be held tonight for John Leonard Driscoll, a native of Piermont, Rockland County, and oldest Mason in the state, who died yesterday at his home. Mr. Driscoll, who had been in remarkable good health until two weeks ago, was 103 years old last October eleventh.

Mr. Driscoll was a descendant of Johannes ver Vailen, one of the holders of the Harlem Patent who had an inn and a ferry at Spuyten Duyvil in the early days of the state. His father was Isaac Driscoll and his mother Eliza Burgess Shaw. His great-grandfather came to the United States from Ireland about the middle of the Eighteenth Century.

Surviving Mr. Driscoll, who had lived under twenty-five of the nation’s thirty-two presidents, are the Misses Lizbeth, Caroline and Louise Driscoll, all at home.

As a boy Mr. Driscoll witnessed the digging of holes and the planting of rails for the Hudson River Railroad. Until the age of sixty he had never smoked. He first tried a cigar, without becoming sick, and then changed to a pipe which was his favorite and constant companion during the last few years of his life.

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Sep 30, 1937

At the age of 100, referring to his job in the 1830’s when pine logs were used for fuel and he was chief engineer for the Catskill Mountain Railroad, he said, “A good fireman in those days would handle the wood only once. He pitched each chunk at such an angle that when it landed on the floor of the engine it would bounce through the fire door into the box.”

He explained his philosophy of life, take it as it comes, by saying:

“When you’ve lived as long as I have, and seen many things, you realize there are few things in the world worth worrying about. It’s a good world, too, as long as people keep their sense of humor.”

Middletown Times Herald (Middletown, New York) Jan 3, 1941

* Another obituary states his wife died in 1903. (See end of post for image.)

* I couldn’t find obituaries for Louise or her sisters. It is possible there were some in the Greene County Examiner-Recorder, but I don’t have access to the years they would have appeared. A shame, really; Louise was a very talented lady and I would like to know more about her.

Quilt square sewn by Louise Driscoll’s grandmother:

From Dutch Door Genealogy:

18. E.B. Driscoll, age 47
She was Eliza Burgess Shaw, mother of Carrie, above, and in 1862 was the widow of Isaac Blauvelt Driscoll (#6010) in 1836. Isaac died in 1851. Their children who lived were John Leonard Driscoll, born 1837, lived to be 103; Charles Francis, born 1841; and Caroline, born 1844. Eliza was a seamstress, per the 1860 census.

Read more about the quilt at the link.

This is the closest I could come to finding a biography, other than the short bit I linked at the top of the post:

Louise Driscoll, who had a story, “The Tug of War,” in Smith’s Magazine for May, and a novelette, “The Point of View,” in the June number of the same magazine, lives in Catskill, N.Y. She has written verse since she was a very little girl, and while still a schoolgirl used occasionally to send poems to the New York newspapers and different magazines, many of them being accepted. It is only within the last few months that she has tried to do much prose, and she says that she has found the editors of the American magazines so ready to receive and educate a new writer that she has no faith in the tales so often heard concerning the necessity of influence to gain attention. Her verses have appeared in Lippincott’s, the Critic — now Putnam’s Monthly — the Independent, the Metropolitan, and a number of other periodicals, and some of them have been widely copied. One poem, “The Highway,” which appeared in Lippincott’s about three years ago, brought her a good many letters from readers, including some editors of other magazines. Miss Driscoll in now at work on a longer and more serious book than “The Point of View,” which is her first long story. She is very ambitious and believes fully in hard work, but she says she writes because she must, and is sure she would write if she had never heard of type. Incidentally, she has a large regard for the English language, and a sincere desire to use it correctly.

The Writer, Volume 19
By William Henry Hills, Robert Luce, 1907

Another garden themed poem by Louise Driscoll:

Olean Evening Times (Olean, New York) Nov 17, 1924

One of Louise Driscoll’s books can be accessed for free at Google Books:

Title: The Garden of the West
Author: Louise Driscoll
Publisher: The Macmillan company, 1922

From Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine – 1907

THE POOR HOUSE

by Louise Driscoll

There’s a white road lined with poplars
And the blue hills rise behind,
The fields lie green on either side
And the overseer’s kind.

This is a play/skit:

Title: The Drama Magazine – Volume 7
Author: Drama League of America
Editors: Charles Hubbard Sergel, William Norman Guthrie, Theodore Ballou Hinckley
Publisher: Drama League of America, 1917
Pages 448-460

This description from The Quarterly Journal of Speech Education – 1918:

One act tragedy for two men and two women. Realistic play of American rural life and the tragedy of weakness and lack of determination.

She also wrote and/or translated music lyrics. I ran across a Christmas carol she did as well:

Polska
Metsän puita tuuli tuudittaa,
ja joka lehti liikkuu,
oksat keinuu, kiikkuu,
karjan kellot kilvan kalkuttaa
ja linnut livertävät
la la la la la la.
Niinpä neidon mieli nuor eli’ ijällä
lentää kuin lehti ilman tiellä
Näin iloiten vain ma laulelen
la la la la la la la la la la la la.
Karjan kellot kilvan kaikottaa
ja linnut livertävät
la la la la la la.

Sunnuntaina taasen kiikuttaa
pojat iloissansa
kukin neitojansa.
Korkealle keinu heilahtaa
ja tytöt laulelevat
la la la la la la.
Niinpä neidon mieli nuorell’ ijällä
lentää kuin lehti ilman tiellä.
Näin iloiten vaan ma laulelen
la la la la la la la la la la la la.
Korkealle keinu heilahtaa
ja tytöt laulelevat
la la la la la la.

*****

Polka

In the woods the trees, the trees are gay.
See how the branches lightly swing and sway, swing and sway.
Sheep bells tinkle and sweet birds sing,
So sing the maidens, tra la, la,la, la,la.
Shaken like a leaf when winds are blowing,
Is a girl’s heart when the rose is showing.
Tra la, la tra la,la, when high flies the swing,
Tra la, la,la,la.la,la,la,la,la,la,la,la.
Her heart goes there like the swing in air,
And falls while she is singing_Tra la, la,la,la,la.

English version by
Louise Driscoll.

Title: Folk Songs of Many Peoples, Volume 1
Editor: Florence Hudson Botsford
Publisher: Womans Press, 1921
Page 26

*     *     *     *     *

Greene County Examiner-Recorder (Catskill, New York) Jan 9, 1941

Franklin LaRue – Veteran Surveyor

November 25, 2011

OUR NONAGENARIANS

Short Sketch of Adams County Citizens of Advanced Age.

F. LARUE, VETERAN SURVEYOR

A Life Full of Usefulness and An Old Age That Is a Pleasure to Himself and Friends

Franklin LaRue, for nearly a generation county surveyor of this county was born on an estate still in the possession of his family near Bath, Steuben County, New York, on December 28th, 1818, being now over ninety years old. He prepared for Amherst College at Prattsburg Academy and studied civil engineering at the Van Rensselaer Institute, Troy, N.Y., now know as Troy Polytecnic Institute.

Mr. LaRue’s first professional work was on the government survey of the lower peninsula of Michigan. Owing to an injury received while thus engaged he was, for a number of years, compelled to abandon field work. During this time he served for four years as county treasurer of Ingham County, Michigan. He then engaged in business in Lansing, Mich., where he resided for many years, being prominently identified with the growth and prosperity of the then comparatively new capital city, and running for state senator on the ticket headed by James Buchanan for president.

Near the close of the civil war he was located in the vicinity of Bloomington, Illinois, where he engaged for a number of years in farming and sheep raising, though he did a great deal of land and road surveying during this period. In 1874 he came to Mercer Township, this county, to improve some land he owned there and was soon elected county surveyor, and held that office as long as he was able to follow his transit. While in office he established the grade of the principal streets of Corning, surveyed the majority of the roads of the county, and left in the office a fine set of maps of the public highways of the whole county which has proved invaluable to his successors.

Mr. LaRue has lived in his present home in Corning for over twenty-five years and the picture presented here-with is a snapshot, taken by a grandson while he was engaged in work about his grounds. After giving up active work he was frequently appointed by the courts to do expert work in finding government corners, throughout this section of the country, and still received requests to do this work, and visits for consultation from many county surveyors, being almost the only living man who was engaged on the original government survey.

Mr. LaRue is very fortunate in retaining full possession of all his faculties, excepting his eyesight, which is growing somewhat dim. His memory is remarkably good, never being at a loss to supply dates and data for the great world changes, and wonderful inventions that have come into being during his remembrance. He also keeps in active touch with all the leading topics of the present day. The boys and girls of his acquaintance delight in propounding mathematical problems to him, which he always solves mentally, extracting the square, cube and sixth root of any number less than one hundred raised to a corresponding power, without the aid of a pencil or paper. His mind is a veritable store house of beautiful poems, with which he is frequently called upon to entertain his friends. He delights in attributing this clearness of memory to the total abstinence of intoxicating liquors and tobacco during his whole life.

Mr. LaRue is one of the grand old gentlemen of the community, enjoying the respect and esteem of all who have the pleasure of his acquaintance. We join his many friends in wishing him health and prosperity for years to come.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Feb 10, 1909


Walnut Grove image from Find-A-Grave, where the gravestones of his family members can be found, but I couldn’t find an entry or photo for his gravestone.

Death of Franklin LaRue.

On Monday, September 30, about 12:30 p.m., there passed to his reward one of the best known and most highly respected citizens of Adams county, Franklin LaRue, the cause of his death being largely old age. For a few days he had been suffering from a cold but his condition was not considered critical by his family. He was conscious to the last. The machinery of the body had done its full work and he peacefully passed away.

The subject of this sketch was born near Bath, Stuben county, N.Y., December 28, 1818, and at the time of his death was aged 93 years, 9 months and 2 days. The funeral was held from the home in the northwest part of the city on October 2 at 10:30 a.m., conducted by Rev. Norman McLeod of the Presbyterian church. Interment in Walnut Grove cemetery along side of his faithful wife who was buried there January 6, 1901.

In his young years he attended Amherst college and studied civil engineering at Van Rensaeller institute, Troy, N.Y.. He was the youngest of a family of twelve children. when a young man he came west and located in Michigan and was engaged in surveying. Here he was married to Miss Amelia Chapin at Mason, Mich., Sept. 25, 1848. To this union were born eight children, six daughters and two sons, four of the daughters died at Lansing, Mich., for many years the family home, in their infancy. The two sons, H.H. and F.L. died and are buried in Corning. The living are Mrs. F.A. Kennon of Corning and Miss Myra LaRue who has made her home with her father.

The family came to Adams county in 1874 and settled in Mercer township. Soon after coming here Mr. LaRue was elected county surveyor and held the office for a number of years. He was an exceptionally good surveyor and much of the work done in this county was by him. In politics Mr. LaRue was a democrat and was a candidate for the state senate in Michigan on the ticket by James Buchanan in 1856. His first vote for president was cast in 1840 and in the present campaign he took a deep interest and from the start was an ardent admirer of Wilson and frequently remarked that he hoped he would live to cast a big vote for the New Jersey governor.

For thirty years he had lived int he home in which his death occurred in Corning, an honored and upright citizen whom it was a pleasure to meet and discuss the topics of the day and the events of many years ago. Until a few years ago he was a great reader and since he could not read on account of failing eyesight he had his daughter and others read to him and he was thoroughly posted on the topics of the day.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Oct 12, 1912

Fulton’s First Ferry – Pilot Dead

November 18, 2011

Image from the Greater Astoria Historical Society website

Death of the Pilot of Robert Fulton’s First Ferry-Boat.

Peter Coffee, the venerable pilot, who ran the Nassau, the first ferry boat built by Robert Fulton, is dead. He expired at the residence of his son, No. 76 Lafayette avenue, on Wednesday. The old pilot was born in Peekskill, in this State, in the year 1777, and was 98 years of age at the time of his death. His father was murdered by robbers while he was carrying the United States mail.

Peter Coffee came to New York in boyhood, and entered the merchant service as a sailor. He served in the United States war vessels Little Adams and York during the threatened war with France, in the early part of the present century. On May 10, 1814, he was made pilot of the Nassau, the first steamboat at Fulton Ferry, of which a model is now in a niche in the front of the Fulton Ferry house in Brooklyn, with a statue of Robert Fulton.

Image from The Project Gutenberg‘s Stories of Great Inventors

He was employed as a ferry pilot until about thirty-five years ago, after which he had charge of the repair department, and, as he became more decrepit, he was given a position as a watchman. He left the service of the ferry company about nine years ago, and has since been living with his son.

Brooklyn Argus.

The Perry Chief (Perry, Iowa) Jul 17, 1875

The Curtain Falls – Creator of “Boots” is Dead

June 25, 2011

Creator of ‘Boots’ Is Dead;
Started Comic Strip in 1924

By ERNEST LYNN
(NEA Service, Inc.)

A great career in the world of comic strips came to a close with the death Aug. 30 in Clearwater, Fla., of Edgar E. Martin.

More than 36 years ago a handsome, slender, blond young man brought to the nation’s newspapers the girl who was to become known as the “Sweetheart of the Comics.” She was called “Boots,” star character of the daily comic strip “Boots and Her Buddies” and the Sunday page “Boots.” The man was Edgar Martin, nicknamed “Abe” by his friends.

At the time of his death, Boots was running in nearly 700 daily and Sunday newspapers, and was followed every day by millions of readers. She exerted a profound influence on women’s fashions.

Martin was born in Indianapolis, Ind., July 6, 1898. Early in his boyhood his family moved to Nashville, Tenn., and then to Monmouth, Ill., where his father was a professor at Monmouth College.

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As a freshman Martin used to draw grasshoppers, lizards and frogs in his father’s biology classes. He quit in his junior year to enter the Academy of Fine Arts in Chicago. He joined Newspaper Enterprise Association in 1921.

At first he drew several comics with varying success. When NEA told him it wanted a girl strip he swung into action and, on February 18, 1924, he came up with the strip that was to bring him fame.

Originally Martin featured four girls in the strip, but soon two of them were dropped. Cora, a school teacher, remained true to type, while Boots was developed into a glamour girl.

Dressing Boots in the latest fashions became a hobby, with him. He attended style shows, read all the fashion magazines, and developed a style sense that the designers of feminine finery often copied. When he gave Boots a new haircut in 1926 and called it the “Boots Bob,” it was a nationwide “click” and was endorsed by leading hairdressers in New York and other cities.

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When Cora, with whom Boots had been living, was married to Prof. Stephen Tutt in 1927, Boots moved in with them. In early days Martin’s comic had its greatest following among high school and college students. They loved his glamour girl, delighted in her numerous romances.

Martin introduced a new character in 1927, popular Pug, who grew up to be one of the best-liked teen-agers in the comics. Boots, the much sought-after belle, remained in single blessedness until readers began demanding wedding bells. In 1945 Martin married her to a Texan named Rodney Ruggles and the strip became a family strip. A son was born in 1946, on the Fourth of July. Once more Boots’ great army of followers showed their interest by besieging Martin with suggestions for a name for the baby. David won by a big vote. Pug became an established member of Boots’ family when her father’s yacht was lost at sea with all on board.

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Nearly every successful comic artist has one or more assistants. Martin was unusual in that he insisted on drawing and writing his strip himself. He finally turned the Sunday paper over to an assistant, but the daily was another matter. He felt so close to the numerous characters, all highly individualized, that he had to do the job himself. Much of Martin’s own character was expressed in the strip, especially in the person of Boots’ brother Billy, who disappeared from the strip some years ago.

Many people said Edgar Martin really was portraying himself in the character of Billy. Martin never admitted this, but he and Billy did have the same fine courtesy and courtly manners. Both were always every inch the gentleman.

Martin lived in Cleveland, headquarters for NEA, for many years. He and his family moved to Clearwater about 20 years ago. He is survived by his widow, Margery, three married daughters and five grandchildren.

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Sep 6, 1960

‘Boots’ Ends Comic Strip Career in Tribune Today

One of the nation’s great comic strips is leaving the daily entertainment scene today.

Edgar E. Martin, creator of “Boots and Her Buddies,” died Aug. 30. His daily strip comes to an end with the conclusion of the current sequence on today’s comic page.

There is symbolism in the falling leaf in the final picture, and in the caption, “The Curtain Falls.” For the curtain has fallen on a daily drama which has entertained the American public for more than 36 years.

Replacing “Boots” in The Tribune will be “The Story of Martha Wayne,” beginning on Monday.

This is a return engagement for this true-to-life narrative, which made a brief appearance in this newspaper several years ago.

Although some Sunday comic pages will continue to carry “Boots” as drawn by Lester Carroll, Martin’s assistant, the Newspaper Enterprise Assn. which syndicates the strip has decided against having the daily version carried on by another artist.

Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin) Oct 15, 1960

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Wisconsin Rapids Tribune (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin) Oct 15, 1960

Old Bucktails Answer the Final Roll Call

November 11, 2010

Alanson E. Niles

DEATH OF COLONEL ALANSON E NILES

SKETCH OF A PROMINENT MILITARY OFFICER AND WELL-KNOWN CITIZEN

Last Thursday morning Colonel Alanson E Niles, of this borough, died at the German hospital in Philadelphia, where he went on the 21st of September to undergo a delicate surgical operation. He stood the operation well and seemed to be on the way to recovery, when Bright’s disease was developed and he rapidly grew weaker until the end. Mrs. Niles and his son Lieut. Nathan E. Niles were at his bedside. The remains were brought home on Friday, and on Saturday afternoon the funeral was held at his late residence on Main street, the burial being with military honors.

Alanson Erric Niles was a son of Mr. Nathan Niles, one of the early settlers of Charleston township. He was born on his father’s farm near this borough October 5, 1816. He inherited the homestead and was engaged in farming until 1857, when he came to this borough and engaged in the mercantile business with Mr. Aaron G. Elliott, the firm of Niles & Elliott doing business in the old wooden building which stood on Main street on the corner just below the First National bank.

In 1861 Mr. Niles was among the first to respond to the call  for volunteers to suppress the Rebellion. He enlisted in this borough, recruiting a company of men, and was elected Captain of Company E of the First Pennsylvania Rifles, better known throughout the country as the “Bucktails.” He was mustered into service May 31, 1861.

At Dranesville on December 20, 1861, the Bucktails are credited with winning the first victory of the war for the army of the Potomac. Here Captain Niles was severely wounded, being shot through the lungs. He was in the hospital some time, but as soon as he was able he hastened back to his regiment.

On the morning of the second day of the battle of Gaines Hill six companies of the Bucktails were stationed on a hill above a swamp to guard a bridge, the only crossing for miles in either direction. When the armies retreated, Companies D and E, with Captain Niles in command, were left to hold the bridge. The boys stood their ground until a Rebel brigade came up in their rear to within ten rods, when they retreated over the brow of the hill to fall into Jackson’s advancing corps. They were completely surrounded and taken prisoners. Company E was the color company of the regiment and rather than have their flag fall into Rebel hands they burned it in the swamp. Captain Niles was in Libby prison for 49 days, when he was exchanged, together with most of the members in his company, and they at once went to the front again.

Captain Niles was promoted to the rank of Major on March 1, 1863, and on the 15th of May following he was made Lieutenant-Colonel of the regiment. It was while with the Bucktails in their charge on Little Round Top at Gettysburg, on the 2d of July, 1863, that he was wounded in the left thigh.

Lieut Col Niles was afterward transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps with promotion to the rank of Colonel. He commanded the corps during the raids of the famous Mosby in eastern Virginia, and at White House Landing he held the field against Mosby’s men for one whole day, when he was relieved by Gen. Sheridan.

Colonel Niles was then sent to Point Lookout, a general depot for prisoners, where he remained in charge until after Lee’s surrender. He then went to Washington.

On the night that President Lincoln was assassinated Col Niles was in Ford’s theater, and he heard the pistol shot and hastened to the hallway and saw the wounded President being carried out.

Col Niles participated in the following battles during the war: New Creek, Hunter’s Mills, Dranesville, Gaines Hill of the seven days fight before Richmond, Fredericksburg, South Mountain, Antietam and Gettysburg.

When the war closed and the grand review was held in Washington Colonel Niles was selected from among the thousands of officers to be the officer of the day, and he had full military charge of the city at the time.

Col Niles was then commissioned as Captain in the regular Army, and for three years he was stationed at Plattsburgh, N.Y., in command of the military barracks.

On account of disability by reason of his wounds he was retired in 1869 with the rank and pay of a Captain, and he came to this borough to reside. After his retirement he lived here quietly, enjoying the respect and esteem of his neighbors, and always taking a lively interest in the affairs of the Government. He was an ardent lover of rifle-shooting and recently notwithstanding his years, he made some remarkable scores on the rifle range.

It can truthfully be said of Col Niles that he was a stranger to fear and a martyr to duty. His record during the war was one of great personal courage and of thorough devotion to the exact discharge of military duty in every station. At home among his friends although of a naturally retiring nature, he was cheerful, genial and steadfast.

Col Niles was married November 10, 1842 to Angeline Austin, of Charleston. Two sons and two daughters were born to them. His widow and Lieut Nathan E. Niles of the Navy, survive him.

The funeral was held last Saturday afternoon at the family residence and it was largely attended. Rev. Dr. A.C. Shaw conducted the service. The Cook Post, G.A.R. attended in a body, and twenty five members of Col Niles’s company acted as a military escort to the cemetery and tenderly committed the remains of their late commander to the dust. Each member wore the distinguishing bucktail on his hat. Among the many floral tributes was a buck constructed of white flowers, which was a testimonial of Company E of the Bucktails. At the cemetery the service was in charge of the Cook Post No. 315, G.A.R.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania Oct 14, 1891

Image from Find-A-Grave

Mr. Henry Clay Roland died at his home in Delmar township last Friday morning — a victim of the prevalent influenza. Mr. Roland was born in Lycoming county forty-eight years ago; but he came to this county when still young, living for a time in Charleston and afterward in Delmar.

During the war of the Rebellion he was an efficient soldier of the Union, being a member of Company E of the Bucktails, under the late Colonel Niles.

After the war he was engaged in farming, and he was an excellent citizen and a man respected and liked by all his acquaintances. The funeral was largely attended last Sunday at the family residence, many of Mr. Roland’s old comrades being present. The interment was in the cemetery in this borough. Mr. Roland leaves a widow and four children — two sons and two daughters.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Apr 6, 1892

Flag image from the Descendant’s Association of the 149th PA Bucktails

Death of Mr. Jacob Huck.

Mr. Jacob Huck, aged 72, died after a week’s illness of pneumonia, on Friday evening at the home of Mr. George W. Smith, at Cedar Run, with whom he made his home. He was a member of Co. E, of the famous 1st Pa. Rifles, or “Bucktails,” and served through the civil war. Five brothers also served in this war.

Mr. Huck had been a member of Wellsboro Lodge, I.O.O.F., for 25 years. He was a conscientious, upright Christian gentleman and was respected and esteemed by all who knew him. Mr. Huck never married. He is survived by the following brothers and sisters: Messrs. Harrison Huck, of Lockhaven; Myron, of Delmar, and Samuel and John, who live in the West, and Mrs. Bert Lloyd, of Olmsville. The Wellsboro Odd Fellows sent a beautiful floral offering and several members of that Lodge besides many Slate Run Odd Fellows attended the funeral at the Cedar Run Methodist church on Monday at 2 p.m.

The following was written by a comrade of the deceased:

“Sergeant Jacob Huck was one of six brothers who enlisted in 1861. Jacob, George and Samuel served in Co. E, of the “Old Bucktails.” Jacob was Color Sergeant for two years and during that time he was wounded three times. At the battle of Cold Harbor a Rebel soldier seized the flag staff and tried to capture the colors. Huck killed him instantly by running him through with a saber. As a soldier and friend none excelled him. He was characterized by his extreme modesty, never mentioning his brave deeds to his most intimate friends. His brothers, Harrison, of Lockhaven, and Myron, of Delmar, with their families, and his sister, Mrs. Bert Lloyd, of Olmsville, attended the funeral. Comrades G.O. Darby, Peter D. Walbridge and W.W. English, of Co. E, with three other veterans acted as pall bearers.”

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Mar 1, 1905

Image from Find-A-Grave

Mr. Chester F. Kimball, aged 64, died Saturday evening about 9 o’clock at his home on Crafton street. He was apparently as well as usual on Saturday afternoon, but was stricken suddenly with paralysis about 4 o’clock while making purchases in Finkelstein Bros.’ store. He was removed to his home, where he passed away within a few hours.

Mr. Kimball was born at Homer, Cortland county, N.Y., on April 30th, 1842. He was twice married, his first wife being Sarah Boydson, whom he married on December 20, 1870. and who died on May 18, 1878. Two sons were born to them, Charles N. Kimball, Esq., of Sistersville, West Virginia, and Mr. Everett E. Kimball, of Cleveland, Ohio, both of whom survive.

On April 30, 1890, Mr. Kimball married Sarah Rollins, of Roundtop, who survives him, with one daughter, Clara A.

Two sisters also survive him, Mrs. Adelbert Green, of Syracuse, N.Y., and Mrs. Miles Dunbar, of Necedah, Wisconsin.

Mr. Kimball enlisted on August 7, 1861, in Co. E, of the 1st Pa. rifles, better known as the “Old Bucktails.” He served with honor and distinction and was one of the best soldiers in his company. He later served with the 13th Veteran Reserve Corps. He was a member of the Union Veteran Legion and of the Methodist church. The deceased was a good man, an upright and progressive citizen and was highly esteemed by all who knew him.

Funeral services will be held this morning at 10 o’clock at the late home of the deceased, Rev. W.H. Reese, D.D., officiating.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Jan 30, 1907

 

Another Veteran Mustered Out.

At his home near Ewing, Neb., February 16th, of bronchitis, Orsamus P. Borden answered the final roll call. He was born November 30, 1829 at Pultney, N.Y., and at the time of his death was 77 years, 2 months and 16 days old.

When a young man he moved with his parents to Tioga county, Pa. He married Miss Sarah Impson, January 28, 1854, in Delmar, Pa. To this union were born four children, three sons and one daughter, only one of whom survive, namely, Arthur H. Borden of Genessee, Potter county. His wife died April 17, 867.

On November 2, 1867, he married Miss Josephine S. Butler, his present wife. To them were born thirteen children of whom five are living, three sons and two daughters.

In 1861, Mr. Borden enlisted in Company E of the “Bucktails.” He served through the entire war. Was taken prisoner at Mechanicsville, June 26, 1862, and spent some time in Libby and Belle Island prisons.

In 1882 he moved his family to Nebraska and settled on a homestead, where he spent the remainder of his days, and with his faithful wife, fought the hard battles, and faced the privations of a frontier life. In courage and fidelity to what he considered right, he proved himself in every respect a man. He was a member of the Grand Army, General Anger Post 192 of Ewing, and no one of its members was more faithful in attendance at its meetings, or more loyal to its laws.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Mar 27, 1907

Another Veteran Gone.

Samuel Freeland, aged 75 years, died last Tuesday morning at 3:45 o’clock at his home in Corning of paralysis.

Mr. Freeland was born in Chatham Tioga county, Pa., December 1, 18[3]3, and the early part of his life was spent on farms in different parts of this country. When the civil war broke out he enlisted in Company A, Bucktails. Early in the war he was captured by the Confederates and was in Libby prison for a number of weeks until he was exchanged. When he entered this famous prison pen he was a large man, weighing over 200 pounds but so severe was his treatment that when he came from the confinement he tipped the scale at only 100 pounds. He was so worn and changed that his own brother failed to recognize him. He again went into active serviced and shortly after he was wounded in the right hip. He lay for four days on the battle field where he received the wound and was finally found by the Rebels and again taken to Libby prison. During the days that he lay on the filed of battle he had only one drink of water, this from the canteen of a Rebel captain. This time he was confined in Libby prison only about six weeks and when exchanged he was honorably discharged from service because of his wound. He carried the bullet to the day of his death.

After recovering from his injury he lived at Addison where he worked in the sash and blind factory and where he married Mary L. Seaman on the first day of February, 1865. He also lived at Coudersport for a time. About four years ago he removed to Corning where he had since lived. Besides his wife he is survived by five children — G.V. Freeland, of Spokane, Wash., C.H. Freeland, of Corning; William Freeland, of Hunt, N.Y.; Mrs. Arthur Slad with whom he lived, and Mrs. Rose Varner, of Albany Falls.

He was a member of the Arch Jones Post, G.A.R. at Coudersport, and was one of the charter members of the W.W. Angle Post, at Addison.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania Mar 3, 1909

Image from the Richard Warren Smith family tree on Ancestry.com

Benjamin W. Topping, Sr., died recently at his home in Elmira, aged 79 years. He is survived by his widow, one son, B.W. Topping, Jr.; one daughter, Mrs. B.G. Birney, of Cincinnati. Mr. Topping had been a resident of Elmira for many years. He was a veteran of the civil war and was a captain in Co. H, Pennsylvania “Bucktails.” He was a commercial traveler for 35 years and, as a cigar salesman, was well known in almost every city and town in northern Pennsylvania and southern New York.

Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania Feb 21, 1917

Image from Find-A-Grave

DEATH OF P.D. WALBRIDGE.

Highly Esteemed Civil War Veteran Died Last Wednesday.

Peter D. Walbridge, aged 83 years, died at the Blossburg hospital early last Wednesday morning, following the amputation of his right leg, which operation was performed Monday. Mr. Walbridge’s right foot had caused him much suffering for several years and not long ago gangrene developed and amputation of his knee was necessary as the only hope of saving is life, but he failed to recover from the shock of the operation.

He is survived by one son, Peter D. Walbridge, Jr., of Pueblo, Colorado, and three daughters, Mrs. W.D. Riffle and Miss May Walbridge, of Wellsboro, and Miss Maude Walbridge, of New York city.

Mr. Walbridge served with conspicuous bravery during the civil war as a member of Co. E, of the famous “Old Bucktails” regiment, and many are the tales of heroism his comrades tell of him, but Mr. Walbridge seldom spoke of his own experiences during the dark days of ’61-’65. He was a prisoner at Andersonville for nearly a year and that trying ordeal took a heavy toll from his naturally strong constitution. Mr. Walbridge had a host of warm friends to whom his death brings deepest sorrow.

The funeral was held Saturday afternoon at two o’clock at the First Baptist church, Rev. C.W. Macgeorge officiating; burial in the Wellsboro cemetery.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Dec 3, 1919

BRILLIANT WAR RECORD.

Brief Review of a Brave Soldier’s Career During the Civil War.

The brilliant and gallant Civil War record of the late Peter D. Walbridge, of Wellsboro, who died a few days ago at the Blossburg Hospital, following amputation of his left leg for gangrene, should not pass unnoticed. He was one of the first from Wellsboro to enlist in the original Old Bucktails under Captain Alanson E. Niles and served throughout the entire Civil War.

Notwithstanding Peter Walbridge was always conceded one of the bravest and most daring soldiers of the fighting Bucktails, having performed many heroic deeds worthy of note, he bore his honors meekly, without display, blow or bluster. He had a big heart and it was in the right place, as all his comrades in arms can testify.

The Gazette takes great pride in presenting the following summary of this brave soldier’s war record:

Peter D. Walbridge enlisted April 28th, 1861, from Wellboro, Pa., and was mustered into the United States service May 31st, 1861, at Harrisburg, as a private to serve for a term of three years in Company E, First Regiment, Penna. Vol. Rifles, under Captains A.E. Niles and S.J. Mack and Cols. Theodore L. Kane, J. Biddle, H.W. McNeil and C.F. Taylor. The Regiment was the 42nd Pa. Vol. Inf., 1st Bucktails or 13th Regiment, Penna. Reserves Infantry.

Moved to a point opposite Cumberland, Md., June 22nd, thence to West Va., in support of Lew Wallace till October; then moved to Tennallytown and attached to McCall’s Reserve Division, Army of Potomac. Engaged at Drainesville, Va., Dec. 20th, ’61. Moved to Virginia Peninsula, June 9th to 12th, ’62.

Attached to 5th Corps Army of Potomac. Engaged in seven days battle before Richmond, Jun 25th to July 1st, ’62; battle of Mechanisville, June 26th; Meadow Bridge, June 26th; Gainesville, July 27th; Savage Station, June 29th; Charles City, Cross-Road and Glendale, Jun 30th ’62; Malvern Hill, July 1st, ’62; battles of Gailnesville and Groveton, August 28th and 29th, ’62; Second Bull Run, August 30th, ’62; South Mountain, Md. Sept. 1?, Antietam, Md., Sept. 7th, ’62. Was wounded here by gunshot in right leg and sent to Harrisburg. Received 50 days furlough to go home from Governor Curtin. Rejoined regiment and participated in battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 13th, ’62, and March, January 20th to 24th, ’63.

Ordered to Washington, D.C., Feb. 6th, ’63. Duty there and at Alexandria till June 25th, ’63. Rejoined the Potomac Army, June 25th, ’63. Attached to 1st Brigade, 3rd Div., 5th Corps, Army of Potomac. Engaged in Battle of Gettysburg, July 1st to 3rd, ’63. Pursuit of Lee, July 5th to 24th, ’63. Engaged at Rappahannock Station, Nov. 7th, ’63; Mine Run, Nov. 26th and 28th, ’63.

Honorably discharged Feb. 27th, ’64. Re-enlisted as a veteran Feb. 28th, ’64, in the field as Sergeant in same Company and Regiment, three years more, or during the war, under Captains S.J. Mack and Col. A.E. Niles. Participated in Battle of the Wilderness, May 5th-7th, ’64;; Laurel Hill, Va., May 8th; Spottsylvania, May 8th to 12th, ’64; assault on the Bloody Angle, May 12th ’64; Spottsylvania Court House, May 13th to 21st, ’64; Harris Farm, May 19th; North Anna River, May 23rd to 26th, ’64; Jericho Ford, May 25th; Penunkeg River, May 26th to 28th; Totokotomy, May 29th to 31st; Bethesda Church, May 30th to June 6th.

Was wounded May 30th in head, left leg and right arm by shell explosion and was captured and taken to Spotts Hospital, Richmond, Va., until July ’64. Then was placed in Andersonville, later Florence, prison. Was paroled and sent to Annapolis, Md. Received furlough home until April, 1865. Rejoined regiment. Was on May 31st, 1865, transferred to Co. E, 190th Reg., Pa. Vol., Infantry, which he joined close to Petersburg. Engaged at Appomattox Court House, Lee’s surrender, April 9th, 1865. Washington, D.C., May 1st to 12th; Grand Review, May 23rd, 1865. Honorably discharged June 28th, 1865, at Harrisburg, by reason of close of war.

The Wellsboro Gazette (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Dec 11, 1919

Image from Find-A-Grave

CIVIL WAR VETERAN ANSWERS LAST CALL

James T. Hebel, 79 years old, a veteran of the Civil War, while accompanying a neighbor, Joseph Lenig from his home in Hunter’s Valley to Newport, Perry County, Pa., on Friday morning, May 26, got off the wagon in the narrows, along the steep mountain road to walk up a hill, and while walking along back of the wagon, dropped dead in the road. Death was due to heart failure.

His son, Alfred of Osecola Mills, went to visit him on Monday, May 22, as had been his custom, about every four to six weeks. On Tuesday morning his father suggested that they go to Newport on Wednesday morning, as he wanted to buy a suit and hat and shoes to wear to the Memorial services at Liverpool on Sunday, May 28 and on Tuesday, May 30. As planned, they went to Newport on Wednesday morning and after making the purchases, and were about to part to go in different directions to their homes, and as his father said “Good Bye” to his boy he remarked, he would wear his new clothes to the memorial services, neither thinking that the time was so near at hand when he should answer the final “roll call” and be numbered among those whose graves would be strewn with flowers, by his few surviving comrades on that day.

Mr. Hebel was born near Liverpool Perry County, Pa., March 19th, 1843. He was the son of George and Rosanna (Matchet) Hebel, natives of Lancaster and Dauphin Counties. The early part of his life was spent in working as a millwright with his father. He was eighteen years old when the Civil War broke out and at once enlisted in the service of his country in Co. B, 7th Penna. Reserves, being organized at Liverpool by Capt. G.K. Shull and after serving in this regiment and company for some time was transferred to the “Old Bucktails” and at the expiration of his 3 year enlistment re-enlisted, for three years more, or until the close of the war. He took part in nearly all the important battles between the Army of the Potomac and the Confederate forces under command of Robert E. Lee, from the first battle of Bull Run to Appomattox. Then took part in the Grand Review at Washington, D.C. Then went to Harrisburg where he was honorably discharged from the United States Service, July 5th, 1865, after having served his country over four years, in its most trying hours.

He then returned to his home in Perry County, but in December of the same year, came to Clearfield, where he learned the carpenter trade under Ezra Ale. During the spring of 1867 he was united in marriage to Miss Charlotte Deis, and moved to Luthersburg, where he followed his trade, farming and lumbering until October 1897 when he was appointed and assumed the position of post master. He resigned that position April, 1906 and moved to Curwensville where his wife died on the 19th of December 1907. He then returned to Perry county and purchased forty acres of land in Hunter’s Valley, near the place of his birth, and about midway between Newport and Liverpool, where he lived during the summer and spent the winter with his four surviving children, Alfred M. of Osceola Mills, Mrs. Mary Freedline of Bell Township near Mahaffey, Clearfield County, Pa., Mrs. C.U. Downs of Kansas City, Mo and Warren L. of Harrisburg, Pa. He is also survived by nine grandchildren.

His Body was taken to Osceola Mills to the home of his son Alfred, on Saturday evening at which place funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 4:30 o’clock, conducted by Rev. J.W. Shillington of the M.E. Church. On Monday morning the body was taken to Luthersburg where it was laid to rest beside that of his wife and deceased children.

Mr. Hebel was a kind and affectionate father and was dearly loved by his children. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church from the time he first moved to Luthersburg until he returned to Perry County, where he associated himself with the church he attended as a boy and was regular in attendance at services until his advanced age made it almost impossible for him to walk the six miles to the church and back.

Clearfield Progress (Clearfield, Pennsylvania) Jun 2, 1922

AGED CIVIL WAR VETERAN DIES

Eugene H. Stone Was Nearly One Hundred Two Years Old.

Eugene H. Stone, of near Wellsboro, civil war veteran, died at the Soldiers’ Facility, Bath, N.Y., Thurdays afternoon, Sept. 2, after a long illness.

There is now only one civil war veteran living in Tioga county, John Eldridge Harvey, aged 101, of Westfield.

Mr. Stone was a half-brother of the late William A. Stone, a former governor of Pennsylvania. He was born in Delmar, Jan. 31, 1842, son of Israel and Abbie Stone. At the age of 19 in August, 1861, he enlisted with Co. E, 42nd Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, known as the Bucktails.

Mr. Stone was captured July 22, 1862, at the battle of Mechanicsville, after being in the battles of South Mountain and Antietam. He was held prisoner at Libby and Belle Isle Prisons 40 days, when he was exchanged and rejoined his regiment. He was mustered out Aug. 7, 1864, at Petersburg, Va.

On Nov. 9, 1864, he married Sarah Francis, daughter of Ephraim Francis, of Charleston. For six years they resided on his parents’ farm and then he purchased adjoining farms in Shippen and Delmar townships.

He went to Pawnee county, Kans., where he took up 160 acres of government land. Three years later he returned to Tioga county.

He served as school director and Shippen township Supervisor, was a member of the Masons and the Grange.

The funeral was held Saturday at the Johnson Funeral Home in Wellsboro, Rev. C.W. Sheriff officiating’; burial in the West Branch cemetery.

Mr. Stone is survived by a son, Fred A. stone, of Ansonia; two daughters, Mrs. Hobart Maynard and Mrs. Rankin Stermer, of Wellboro, R.D.; five grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren.

The first three “Bucktail” companies were organized by Thomas L. Kane at Smethport, McKean county, in April, 1861. One volunteer, seeing a deer suspended in front of a market, cut off the buck’s tail and stuck it in his hat and when he enlisted the name “Bucktail” was adopted.

The Tioga county contingent was organized in early May, 1861, by R.C. Cocks, of Liberty, afterward Colonel of the 207th Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers and later advanced to Brigadier General, in answer to President Lincoln’s call for 75,000 men.

The Wellsboro regiment was commanded by Alanson [E.] Niles. This troop, with four others, marched overland to Troy and took the Northern Central Railroad to Harrisburg, announcing the arrival at the state capitol by a salvo of musketry. The contingent became Co. E, First Pennsylvania Rifle Regiment, and entered active service.

Mr. Stone participated in many of the principal battles of the war. He had three brothers in the Union forces. One was a member of his own company. All returned to their homes at the close of the war.

Of adult population of 6,000, 2,000 Tioga county men enlisted in the civil war and 445 never came back, a record equaled by only one other county in the union in proportion to population.

Wellsboro Agitator (Wellboro, Pennsylvania) Sep 8, 1943

The Grand Review in ’65 and ’92

November 10, 2010

G.A.R. AT WASHINGTON,

Largest Demonstration ever made by the Organization.

Grand Army week at Washington opened fair and the weather generally was pleasant during the national Encampment. All day and night of Monday the streets were alive with marching men, G.A.R. posts and their friends, on their way from railroad stations to quarters. Despite all the exertions that the railroad companies made to handle the crowds promptly, the visitors were from two to twelve hours late in reaching the city; but as rapidly as possible the trains were rolling into the city and unloading their human freight. The passengers accepted the situation with the best possible grace, and whatever the measure of their discontent it was all dissipated upon arriving at the Capitol, as they looked upon the generous and artistic manifestations of welcome and found themselves surrounded with reminiscences of the war and in the society of those whose friendship was knit in the blood and smoke of battle.

Tuesday was the great day of the reunion, with its grand parade, intended to be in commemoration of the grand review of 1865. Fifty thousand Union survivors of the great struggle marched over the identical route taken on that memorable occasion. Thirty thousand other wearers of the Grand Army badge or button, withholding themselves from the procession for various reasons, stood along the curbs or sat upon the stands, cheering their comrades as division by division, platoon by platoon, passed by for nearly seven unbroken hours. Along the two-mile route fully 350,000 persons were gathered to watch the procession. The parade was, with few exceptions, composed of men who were young 30 years ago, but who are now advanced in years. They wore the blue uniforms of the Grand Army, which is neat, but not gaudy, and they marched as old men march. With many it was an effort to cover that long stretch of road-way after waiting several hours to fall into line. Many were suffering from wounds which had never healed; many were broken and bent with rheumatism and other diseased incident to camp life. But what they lacked in grace and movement they made up in spirit and determination, and at every step they were cheered with heartiness which they would have been less than human not to appreciate.

The posts marched in two parallel columns, each of 12 files front, to Fifthteenth street and then the columns united and formed one sold column of 24 files front. At the Treasury Department Vice President Morton reviewed the procession and at the War Department the veterans marched in review before their commander-in-chief, Gen. Palmer.

Illinois had the place of honor in the parade, the State being the parent of the Grand Army of the Republic. Wisconsin came next, followed by Ohio. New York had 10 brigades in line. Massachusetts had 211 posts. New Jersey 70, Maine 15, California 14, Rhode Island 16, New Hampshire 17, Vermont 21, Maryland 49, Iowa 50, Oklahoma 1. The Department of Virginia and North Carolina marched 700 men in line. Nebraska, Texas, Alabama, North and South Dakota and Connecticut made a fine showing. The Pennsylvania department mustered 15,000 strong and was the largest in the long and splendid parade.

Wednesday opened with business sessions of the Grand Army, the Union Veterans’ Union, the Woman’s Relief Corps, the Ladies’ Aid to the S.of V., the Daughters of Veterans, Ladies of the Grand Army and Women’s Relief Union. In the afternoon a consolidated band of 1,500 pieces gave a patriotic concert in the Capitol grounds.

The post with the largest membership in the country naturally attracted much attention, and this was intensified by a mammoth model of the typical industry of the city in which it is located. It is General Lander post of Lynn, Mass., which numbers over 1,200 men. They carried with them an immense shoe, twelve feet long.

Preliminary to the festivities of the week was the dedication of Grand Army Place, located on the famous White Lot just south of the White House grounds.

A striking display was the surprise offered by the Iowa department. They carried in the air 3,000 cornstalks, some of them nearly six inches in diameter, and each man had an ear of corn strapped to his back.

Among the notable arrivals was that of the famous Sixth Massachusetts, the first to respond to President Lincoln’s call for troops. En route to Washington they were fired upon in Baltimore, April 19, and spilled the first blood after the assault upon Fort Sumter. Several hundred men were present with the command.

Col. A.G. Weissert, of Wisconsin, was elected National Commander and Indianapolis selected as the place of next year’s reunion.

Gettysburg Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Sep 27, 1892

NOTE: Both Images above are from Wikipedia

*****

The following obituaries all have a common thread. All men were Civil War veterans and all marched in the Grand Review of 1865 in Washington, D.C. Most of them also have some connection to the State of Pennsylvania, with one or two exceptions.

At the bottom of the post, there are two articles about Civil War animal mascots — a dog and a rooster.

Carson Lutz.

Carson Lutz, familiarly known to most people in the Glen Campbell and Burnside sections as “Kit Carson,” passed away in the home of a daughter in Hobart, Ind., Sunday, April 6. Following the services there his body was brought to Glen Campbell, his former home, where funeral services were conducted at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon in the Baptist Church, conducted by the Rev. Mr. Marks. Interment was made in Burnside Cemetery, alongside of his wife and daughter, who preceded him to the grave several years ago. It was a military funeral, conducted by members of the American Legion of Glen Campbell, assisted by a firing squad from the American Legion Post of Clearfield.

Carson Lutz was born in Lancaster county, September 5, 1848 and enlisted in Company B, Forty-fifth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers in January, 1864, being honorably discharged July 17, 1865. He was engaged in several battles and was present at Lee’s surrender. He was also proud of having marched with the million soldiers in the grand review at Washington, D.C.

He was one of the pioneers of the northern part of Indiana county and helped to cut and raft a great deal of timber that grew in that section. He sometimes worked as one of the woods crew, but mostly as the camp cook. His reputation as a cook was known to all old woodsmen and in later years he cooked for hunting camps, many of the deer hunters recalling “Kit” and his wonderful meals.

For the past 17 years he had made his home with his two daughters. He leaves the daughters, Mrs. James Judge of Hobart, Ind., and Mrs. C. Fred Brands of Gary, Ind.; two grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. At the time of his death he was a member of William Ketcham Post, Grand Army of the Republic of Gary, Ind.

Indiana Evening Gazette (Indiana, Pennsylvania) Apr 14, 1930

Image from Find-A-Grave (NOTE: previous image has been replaced due to copyright)

PROFESSOR WERT, LONG ILL, DIES

Former Head of County Schools Was Well Known Writer.

WROTE SEVERAL NOVELS

Took Part in Civil War Playing a Part in the Battle of Gettysburg. Wrote History of Conflict.

Professor J. Howard Wert, well known writer and educator, with many friends in Adams county where he was the superintendent of schools for several years, died Thursday night at his home in Harrisburg after a long illness at an advanced age. He had been seriously ill for some weeks and his death was not unexpected. For years he had been living retired.

Professor J. Howard Wert was born on a farm near Gettysburg, the only child of Adam and Catharine (Houghtelin) Wert. His father, a man of exceptional ability, was a leader among Pennsylvania Abolitionists. His mother, also very gifted, was very conspicuous in the annals of early Methodism in Southern Pennsylvania.

After a preliminary course in the rural public schools and the Gettysburg High School, in all of which he evinced a precocity which made him the marvel of the community, the deceased spent six years at Gettysburg College, graduating in 1861.

While in college, he acquired considerable reputation as a writer; becoming a contributor to nearly all the Boston and New York literary periodicals of that day.

His first serial, “The Mystic League of Three,” a novel in twenty chapters, written while in the Sophomore year, won a prize and was published in Frank Queen’s “New York Clipper.” Having been dramatized, it was produced soon after at one of the Bowery theaters, wit ha run of 4 consecutive nights. It was a story of sporting life in the large cities written at a time that the young author had never seen a larger town than Gettysburg.

In various capacities, Professor Wert saw many of the stirring scenes of the Civil War, including the battle of Gettysburg, where he had exceptional opportunities for observation both during and after the conflict. During the Gettysburg campaign he did considerable service as a scout for which he was well fitted by his intimate knowledge of the whole surrounding country. On the afternoon of the first day of the battle, he was the guide who conducted the head of General Slocum’s 12th corps to the position it subsequently held in Culp’s Hill, after having informed the officers leading the column of the positions which Early’s Confederate corps had gained on the other side of Rock Creek.

Concerning the decisive battle he had written many valuable articles and pamphlets, as well as an extended history, first published in 1886, which had sold extensively on trains and on the field for several years. A second Gettysburg battle history written for a New York syndicate as a souvenir gift to G.A.R. posts in connection with the Semi-Centennial celebration of 1913, and published from the plant of the Harrisburg Telegraph was characterized by a competent reviewer as “The most vivid pen-portraiture of the great battle ever written, and on of the finest specimens of historic word painting in the English language.”

The close of the war found Professor Wert a lieutenant in Company G, 209th Pennsylvania Volunteers. This regiment served first in Butler’s Army of the James, and then became a part of Hartranft’s celebrated Pennsylvania command, — the Third Division, Ninth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac. With it the deceased participated in some of the severest engagements around Richmond and Petersburg including the storming of the latter city; and followed up Lee’s retreating army to the surrender at Appomattox.

He also participated in the Grand Review of the Army of the Potomac, May 23, 1865, when, for seven continuous hours, 80,000 veterans, solidly massed from curb to curb, swept down Pennsylvania Avenue, at the nation’s capital, passing before President of the United States and General Grant.

The Gettysburg Times (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Mar 13, 1920

161st Indiana Infantry Band

Not the same Indiana Infantry Band – Read more about this one from the Spanish American War HERE

OBITUARY

Abram Rummel, one of the oldest and highly esteemed citizens of this place, was found dead Sunday morning in his chair at his home on the east side. He was found by his daughter, Margaret, who having heard him arrange the fire earlier in the day, thought he was sleeping and did not disturb him until the breakfast hour. Evidently he attended the fire and then sat down in his accustomed chair as was his wont to often sleep there rather than lie down owing to heart trouble, and of which he evidently died.

Mr. Rummel was born March 16, 1840, at Creswell, Lancaster county, Pa., the son of Adam and Anna Rummel, and was brought by his parents to this state in 1847. When a young man he joined his brothers Felix and Adam in the wagon making and smith trade at Germantown. While here he joined a local cornet band, which afterward tendered its services to Governor Morton and was assigned to the Twelfth Indiana Infantry as the regimental band and later the brigade band. Of this band Amos Bear of Richmond is the surviving member. After three years service the band was mustered out in 1865 after participating in the “grand review” at Washington. Returning to Germantown, Mr. Rummel was married to the love of his youth, Miss Mary Jane Ocker, who died July 19, 1913. The children are J. Willard Rummel of New Castle, and Mrs. Ida Martin and Miss Margeret Rummel of this city. Oscar Valentine died in 1875. The grandchildren are Miss Lula Martin of this city and Miss Thelma Rummel of New Castle.

In 1865 Mr. Rummel joined Walnut Level lodge of Odd Fellows, which membership he transferred to Wayne lodge when he and his brothers came to this city and engaged in business the same as in Germantown. Two years ago Wayne lodge gave him a veteran’s jewel, having been a member 50 years and financial secretary 20 years. He was also a member of the G.A.R. and M.E. church.

In 1881 Mr. Rummel was elected a town trustee and served five years. For a quarter of a century he was connected with the township assessor’s office, first as deputy and later assessor. In all those offices of honor and trust Mr. Rummel fitted his duty as he saw it. Whether as a soldier, a public servant, a lodge member, or a husband and father, he discharged his duties in that exalted manner that marks the exemplary citizen.

Funeral services were held at the M.E. church Tuesday afternoon by Rev. Jones, the W.R.C. and Odd Fellows. The attendance was large and the floral tributes many and very pretty. Burial in Riverside.

Cambridge City Tribune (Cambridge City, Indiana) Feb 8, 1917

Wisconsin Memorial at Vicksburg

Image from the book, Wisconsin at Vicksburg on Google

A SOLDIER’S RECORD

Interesting Account of Army Service During Civil War By the Late A.N. Maltby.

A.N. Maltby, who died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. J.N. Welsbey, last Wednesday afternoon, was a Civil war veteran and took part in Sherman’s “March to the Sea” and the Grand Review at Washington. Among the Possessions he left was a brief account of his army record, which is published below and will undoubtedly prove interesting to Gazette readers:

“I enlisted August 7, 1862, at Tomah, Wis. The company was quartered in Sparta and joined the regiment at La Crosse. Was mustered into United States service September 14, 1862, with Co. D, 25th Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry.

“The regiment was ordered to Minnesota on October 1 and D company was stationed at Mankato to protect the city from the Indians. In December of that year the regiment was ordered back to Wisconsin and we marched from Mankato to La Crocce. Arrived at Madison Dec. 20, when we all got a ten day furlough.

“In the February following we went south via Chicago and Cairo, Ill., and went int camp at Columbus, Ky., where we stayed until Jun 1, when we went down the Mississippi river to Vicksburg, then up the Yazoo river to Yazoo City, then back to Haynes Bluff, in the rear of Vicksburg, where we were in the siege until the surrender on July 4, 1863. On July 7, I got sick furlough home for 30 days, and rejoined my company and regiment at Helena, Ark., September 1. At this time the 25th had only 57 men fit for duty and 800 men on the company rolls. In February we left Helena and went again to Vicksburg and from that place on the ‘Meridian March’ with Sherman. We were back in Vicksburg at the end of 30 days and then went by steamboat up the Mississippi to Cairo, then up the Ohio and the Tennessee rivers to Mussels Sholes,, then by rail to Decatur, Ala. From there we marched to Chatanooga, Tenn., and on the first of May, 1864, started with General Sherman on the Atlanta campaign.

“At this time the 25th was in the Second Brigade, 4th Division, 16th Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee. This division was in the flanking corps and was all the time marching or fighting. Our first battle was at Resaca, May 14, 1864. The company and regiment took part in all the fighting, including the battle of Atlanta, and the chase after General Hood’s Confederates back toward Chattanooga. At Atlanta Co. D lost just one-half of the company in killed, wounded and prisoners. Of the four captured, three were wounded and died in the Andersonville prison, while the fourth was exchanged.

“Before beginning the March to the Sea we were reorganized and our brigade, the 43rd and 63rd Ohio, the 17th New York and the 35th New Jersey was the 2nd Brigade, 7th Division, 17th Army Corps, General Mower Division Commander.

“The March to the Sea began in Nov. 1864, and before Christmas we had taken the city of Savannah, Ga. In January, 1865, we went by transport to Beaufort, S.C., and captured Fort Pokatolligo. On February 1 we began the march for Richmond, Va. Our last battle was at Bentonville, N.C. Was at Raleigh,  N.C., when General Johnson and army surrendered to Sherman. From Raleigh we marched through Richmond and Petersburg to Washington; took part in the Grand Review and was mustered out the 7th day of June, 1865, by reason of the end of the war.

“I was appointed corporal August 27, 1862, at La Crosse, and sergeant October 1, 1863, by M. Montgomery, colonel commanding the regiment. I was in every march, skirmish and battle in which the regiment took part and was in command of the company in its last battle at Bentonville,  N.C. At the time we were mustered out at Washington, D.C., I was offered a brevet captaincy and refused it.”

The Gazette (Stevens Point, Wisconsin) Feb 16, 1916

Image from Find-A-Grave for Barney B. Bartow

GEORGE WASHINGTON WEIGHT.

A Respected Citizen And An Old Soldier Entered Into Rest.

On Tuesday morning about ten o’clock, the life of George Washington Weight, one of Snyder township’s respected citizens, passed into the eternal world. As he was born and raised in this community he was known as an upright, honest man, who always did unto others as he would have them do unto him. He had always been a strong, robust man and used to hard work. Last Friday he caught a heavy cold which developed into pneumonia and on account of his advanced age he was not able to withstand the disease and death ended his sufferings at the above mentioned time.

When the was clouds of the Rebellion hung heavy over our country, he was among the brave boys that went to the front to fight for the flag and country that he loved. He placed his life as a sacrifice on the country’s altar, but was among the fortunate that escaped the ravages of bullets and shell, although the many hardships that he and many of the old veterans experienced was enough to kill any man. He was a member of Company D, 208th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. This regiment was in the Third brigade, Third division and Ninth army corps of the Potomac. He fought at Hatchers Run, in February, 1865, and was in the attack on Fort Stedman, March 25, 1865. He was also in the fight Petersburg and was present when that city surrendered to the Union army. His regiment pursued Lee along South Side railroad to Notaway court house and only halted in their march when the news reached them that the brave southern General had surrendered at Appomotox court house. Comrade Weight participated in all these engagements and was honorably discharged June 1, 1865, at the close of the war, after which he took part in the grand review in Washington. He returned to his home at Ironsville after the war and followed his occupation, that of a knobler, at the Tyrone Forge.

In August, 1858, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Woomer, who preceded him to the grave December 25, 1894. When only a young man Mr. Weight united with the Methodist Epsicopal church, at Ironsville and he always endeavored to live according to its teachings. He was an active member of Colonel D.M. Jones post No. 172, G.A.R., and always delighted to participate in any meetings held by this organization.

George Washington Weight was born near Ironsville, December 11, 1833 and was aged 74 years, 11 months and 13 days at the time of his death. He leave to mourn his demise the following children: Thomas Weight, of Tyrone; Harry Weight, Mrs. Viola Gillman, Mrs. Grove Cox, Sylvester Calvin and Walter, of Ironsville; General Grant, of East Altoona, and Mrs. Katharine Mingle, of Birmingham. Also one brother, Thomas Weight, of Ironsville.

The funeral services will be held in the Methodist Episcopal church at Ironsville, on Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock, conducted by Rev. Gordon Gray, the pastor. The funeral cortege will leave the house promptly at fifteen minutes of two o’clock and proceed to the church. Interment will be made in Grand View cemetery. The services at the grave will be in charge of Col. D.M. Jones post No. 172, G.A.R., of which he was a charter member.

Tyrone Daily Herald (Tyrone, Pennsylvania) Nov 25, 1908

Image from the website: Wisconsin Civil War Battle Flags

ARUNAH B. DWINELL DEAD

Well Known Citizen and Supervisor of the Sixth Ward Passes Away Very Suddenly This Morning.

For nearly four months A.B. Dwinell of this city had been in failing health, and had been confined to his home under the care of a physician for just eight weeks. The first three or four weeks of this time he suffered greatly, but since then had been apparently much improved and was able to rest comfortably most of the time, both day and night, something that he had not been able to do at first. On one or two occasions during the past couple of weeks his condition was considered critical at brief intervals, however, but he soon revived from these spells and was apparently on the road to enjoy better health. While fully realizing that his condition was most serious, and having expressed the opinion that he could not survive, making this remark for the last time yesterday, he was ever cheerful and did not complain, seeming to be ever solicitous for his faithful wife and daughters, who rarely left his side, even for a moment, during the past eight weeks. Last night he retired at about 9:30 o’clock and slept soundly throughout the night. Soon after 6 o’clock this morning Mrs. Dwinell heard her husband cough in a ajoining room, but as this was not unusual, she did not at once arise, getting up a few minutes later, however, and when she approached his bedside, she was horrified to find that her husband had passed away. He was lying peacefully as though in sweet sleep, having his hands folded over his breast and had undoubtedly died without a struggle. His illness and death was due to a compilation of dropsy and heart trouble.

Arunah B. Dwinell was born at Erie, Pa., May 13, 1838, and was therefore in the 70th year of his age. When about 12 years of age his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Luther H. Dwinell, moved to Michigan and after a short stay in that state, came to Fond du Lac and thence to Portage county in 1850, this having been the home of the now deceased ever since. His father died in Stockton in 1870 and is mother in 1878. The son remained on the homestead in the town of Stockton until he enrolled as a soldier in the civil war in September, 1861.

He enlisted at Plover in Co. B., 14th Wis. Infantry. The regiment organized at Fond du Lac, where it remained until March 6, 1862, when it proceeded to Benton Barracks, St. Louis, and after a stay of two weeks went to Savannah, Tenn. Orders were received to join the forces of Grant at Pittsburg Landing, and the regiment in which Mr. Dwinell was serving moved to embark on the transport, but did not arrive on the field until nearly midnight of April 6th, they forming in line of battle at once, notwithstanding heavy rain was falling. They went into action and fought on the second day of the battle, where they acquitted themselves with conspicuous bravery. Mr. Dwinell performed provost duty at Pittsburg Landing until he was taken sick and sent to the hospital at St. Louis, where after two weeks he received a furlough for fifteen days, which was extended, and he reported to Gen. Gaylord at Madison and remained in the hospital there until the fall of 1862, when he received an honorable discharge and returned to Plover. Aug. 21, 1864, he again enlisted, this time in Co. F, 5th Wis. Infantry, in the reorganized command. On the formation of his company he was made orderly sergeant and proceeded with his command to the Army of the Potomac, where he was connected with duty on the Orange & Alexandria R.R., for a brief time. Thereafter he went to the Shenandoah Valley, where the regiment joined the “Independent Battalion,” the remainder of the old 5th, at Winchester. They then went to Cedar Creek, the command being engaged in skirmishing on the right. At the latter place the soldiers were given the privilege of voting, and Mr. Dwinell’s second vote was cast for Abraham Lincoln. December 1st they went to Petersburg, going into winter quarters in front of that city, Mr. Dwinell performing picket duty until Feb. 5, 1865. He was in the fight at Hatcher’s Run and afterwards at Ft. Fisher, and in April in the charge of Petersburg, his knapsack being shot from his back on the morning of the second day of that month and he was slightly wounded in the shoulder in the afternoon. The next day he was in pursuit of Lee and fought on the 7th at Sailor’s Creek, where the entire force of rebels were killed or captured. He also took part in the surrender at Appomatox, after which he went to Danville to the assistance of Sherman, but went back to Wilson Station and thence to Washington, where he was in the Grand Review and was discharged at Madison, June 20, 1865, returning to the village of Plover. December 15, 1861, he was married to Ida E. Morrill, who survives him. They were the parents of nine children, two of whom, Edith died at the age of two years, and Fred J. passed away at Rugby, N.D., four years ago the 16th of June. Those who survive are George L., sheriff of Waukesha county, Arthur J. of Rugby, N.D., Ada B., now Mrs. C.W. Rhodes of Madison, Allie, now Mrs. G.S. Putney of Waukesha. Miss Ethel, who is employed as stenographer for the Wilbor Lumber Co. at Waukesha, Bernice, now Mrs. John C. Miller of Madison, but who is ill in a Chicago hospital, and the Misses Beatrice and Ida E., who are at home, the latter being employed as stenographer in the law offices of McFarland & Murat. He also leaves one brother, C.H. Dwinell of this city, and two sisters, Mrs. Amasa Ball of Idaho and Mrs. Clara Perkins, who resides somewhere in the west.

Mr. Dwinell had resided in this city since 1878 and had served as alderman and supervisor, being elected as supervisor again at the April election. He was a man of far more than ordinary ability, shrewd, sharp and progressive, and he always took an active interest in home, state and national affairs. In politics he was a Democrat for a number of years, but for the past several years had been affiliated with the Republican party. The only organization that he belonged to was the Grand Army Post, being a charter member of the local society.

The time of the funeral has not been fully decided, and will not be until the arrival of his sons and daughters, but will probably not take place until Sunday afternoon. Rev. James Blake of the Baptist church will officiate and the officers of the local Post will not doubt conduct the services at the grave.

The Gazette (Stevens Point, Wisconsin) Jul 24, 1907

Jack Brutus belonged to the Connecticut military troops during the Spanish-American War.  I couldn’t find a picture of  “Jack,” the Civil War bulldog. More Civil War mascots can be found at the Fort Ward Museum website.

Dog Had Prominent Part in the Civil War

Twice wounded, three time taken prisoner and having fought in a score of battles during the civil war, was part of the interesting career of “Jack,” a bulldog, which accompanied members of the old Niagara fire department when they enlisted and became a part of the One Hundred and Second Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers. Through the entire war he wore a collar that cost $75, and before he died, several years later, this collar was adorned with several medals, worth several hundred dollars. When he died, this ornament was left around his neck and the body was wrapped in a small American flag before being buried.

Jack accompanied the regiment through the following battles: Yorktown, the battle of Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Savage Station, Malvern Hill, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Marv’s Heights, Mine Run, the Seven Days’ Battle, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Petersburg, the defense of Washington, July 11, 1864, Winchester, Flint Hill, Fisher’s Hill and Middletown.

At the battle of Malvern Hill he was shot through the shoulder and back. At Salem Heights he was captured, held a prisoner and exchanged for a Confederate soldier. During the engagement at Savage Station he was again taken prisoner, but detained only six hours. During the entire war he followed the regiment, and when the army assembled in Washington for the grand review Jack was one of the conspicuous features of the parade. He was taken to one of the northern counties of the state by one of the officers of the regimental association, who kept him until he died.

The Indianapolis Star (Indianapolis, Indiana) May 21, 1911

A TRAVELED ROOSTER.

When the 16th regiment marched through town, a little white bantam rooster was observed perched on the knapsack of one of the men. We learn that it has an interesting history. It was carried from Madison in 1863 and taken into the ranks of the 32d regiment, which it accompanied through the Mississippi march to Meridian and back to Vicksburg, thence to Decatur, Alabama, and on the march to Atlanta, at whose capture it was present on the grand march through Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina, to Raleigh. With the 32d it went north to Washington and with it passed in the grand review.

Subsequently it was transferred to the 16th veterans and in now mustered out and on its way home. The little fellow had been carried on the knapsack the entire rounds, and has been in all the battles and skirmishes in which the 32d has participated. — Madison Journal.

Cedar Falls Gazette (Cedar Falls, Iowa) Aug 4, 1865

The Bone Rattler: Michael N. Gery

March 19, 2010

Michael N. Gery - The Bone Rattler

STATE’S EXPERT BONE RATTLER LAID TO REST

SONS AND SON-IN-LAW ARE BEARERS AT FUNERAL  OF MICHAEL N. GERY, NEAR HEREFORD.

Hereford, Jan. 29 (Special). — Michael N. Gery, aged 88 years, who had been dubbed as the state champion bone rattler and old-time frolic fiddler, was buried from his home near this place. Services were held at the house, Rev. James N. Blatt, Reformed pastor of Huff’s Church, officiating. Further services were held at Huff’s Church, where interment was made.

Five sons and a son-in-law were the bearers at the house, as follows: Sons, Alfred, Allentown; John, East Greenville; Horace and James, this place, and Charles, East Macungie; son-in-law, Charles Roeder, Sigmund. At the church six members of Harlem Castle, No. 335, K.G.E. were the bearers. The remains reposed in an oak casket with plate inscribed “Father.” Undertaker William H. Dimmig, East Greenville, had charge.

The funeral was one of the largest held at Huff’s Church in many years, deceased having had a large acquaintanceship. At the time of his death he was treasurer of the Gery Family Reunion Association, and members of the clan knew him as “a young old man,” for even in recent years not a family meeting was held without the deceased giving an exhibition of bone rattling, violin playing and jig dancing.

Road Supervisor 20 Years.

For 20 years Mr. Gery served his township as road supervisor and was one of the first men in lower Berks county to foster the movement for better roads, improving them with the use of road machinery and macadamized material.

About 65 years ago he gained notoriety at the then old-time country frolics, where the lads and lassies of the rural communities gathered at the rural hotels and engaged in jigs and hops. He and his brothers, and later his sons, would sit on top of barrels and store boxes and fiddle and rattle the bones, while the buxom swains reeled around the pretty country maidens on the pewter sanded floors of the dining rooms of the roadside hotels.

None knew better how to cater to this — one of the earliest amusements of social life — 60 and more years ago, in the Pennsylvania German communities. In one evening, Gery and his family would get from $10 to $30 to play the jigs and reels, including such old-time frolic music as the “Kutztown Reel” and “Fisher’s Hornpipe.” Gery was a past master in calling out the dance gestures and every young man and woman knew what he meant when he bellowed forth his figures. Many a time would he throw the fiddle to his eldest son and then take the floor himself and dance until midnight. The last time he appeared in public with his bones in his hands was at the annual Gery reunion last fall, where he showed an audience of 3,000 persons that he still was able to bring forth real old-fashioned music, though he was four-score years and eight.

Had Attractive Offers.

When still quite young he had offers of $100 per week from shows and at one time refused a most flattering offer to appear at the then well-known amusement house in Philadelphia, “Carncross & Dixie,” because his father would not consent to his absence from home.

With his family he conducted many years an orchestra of string and wind instruments, as every one of his sons and daughters were musicians. He also helped to organize a number of orchestras and was well known in musical circles in lower Berks and upper Montgomery counties.

He was an expert in telling Pennsylvania German stories and jokes and whenever he came to the crossroads store he kept the farmers in a jolly mood. Then he also kept up a record of a Sullivan in his community for two generations. He was a man who never sought a quarrel, but during the country dance era such fights among the young folks were of frequent occurrence, and “Mike” Gery acted as peacemaker at a score of the most important fights, where he had to use his fists to impress his peace arguments. Only once in his long career did he get licked, and then he fought single-handed a dozen assailants and laid eight of them on the floor before he went sprawling himself.

He is survived by six sons and two daughters and many grandchildren, among them Francis Ritter, a grandson, who is able to take the grandfather’s place at bone rattling and keep it up with the enviable record the grandfather made during more than 65 years of experience.

Reading Eagle – Jan 29, 1917

The Hereford Literary Society Reunion - 1903

An Ohio Pioneer Woman’s Obituary

October 16, 2009

pioneers river

From the TRIBUNE.

DIED — December 31st, 1870, Mrs. Martha Alford, re???? of Esquire R.B. Alford, late of Portsmouth. Mrs. Alford was born in Mason County, Kentucky, about the year 1797, the precise date not known. She came to Portsmouth in the spring of 1812, consequently she has resided in Portsmouth and vicinity nearly fifty-eight years.

Her father’s family emigrated from Maryland to Kentucky in 1793, while the Indians were yet prowling along the banks of the Ohio, watching for an opportunity to decoy boats within their power, so as to murder and scalp the defenceless emigrants and plunder their boats of whatever they contained. However, the boat containing the family of Griffith Jones ran the gauntlet in safety without any thing more serious happening to them than a false alarm or two and hearing an occasional war whoop or a yell from the infurate savages.

Mrs. Alford was born into the Methodist church and always lived a consistent member of that denomination, and was a truly exemplary christian mother in Israel. In order to have cicar conception of her christian character it is necessary to go back a little and see under what circumstances she became a christian.

Her father joined the Methodist church before the revolutionary war under the preaching of the first founders of Methodism in America. When such preachers as Freeborn, Garrettson and Abbott, and other of lesser note were carrying every thing before them with their powerful preaching. His house was always the preacher’s home.

A rude log cabin, perhaps it generally was, yet the weary “itinerant,” with his horse and saddle bags, always found a welcome home at the house of Griffith Jones. So that Martha, the youngest child of a large family, as was said above, was literally born into the Methodist church. As to how well she performed the duties of a christian, all those who were acquainted with her can testify.

She was twice married. The first time to a man by the name of Lodge, who died early with the consumption. She had three children by her first husband who inherited their father’s disease and all died soon after coming to maturity. She had no children by her last husband, consequently leaves no descendants.

She was the last survivor of a large family, who flourished here in the early settlement of Portsmouth. Some few of the Glovers and Joneses yet remain amongst us.

The Portsmouth Times (Portsmouth, Ohio) Jan 7, 1871

Robert Hoe of R. Hoe & Co.

March 23, 2009
Hoe Web Press

Hoe Web Press

ROBERT HOE DEAD.

One of the Celebrated Printing Press Manufacturers Breathes His Last.

NEW YORK, September 14. — Robert Hoe, of the firm R. Hoe & Co., printing press manufacturers, died at his residence in Tarrytown at 7:30 A.M. yesterday, at the age of seventy years. [Mr. Robert Hoe was born in New York city in 1814. His father, Robert Hoe, was an Englishman. In 1803 he founded in New York the great business which for many years has been known as that of R. Hoe & Co. Robert Hoe, Sr., was the first man in the United States who made saws of cast steel, and the first in New York to drive the machinery in his factory by steam. In 1805 he began the manufacture of printing presses, and in 1827, that of cylinder presses. In 1841 the business went into the hands of his three sons, Robert (the deceased), Richard and Peter. Richard was the inventive genius of the concern, but a great deal of the firm’s success depended on Robert’s sound business management. The presses of the Hoe establishment have a world-wide reputation. They are used not only throughout this country, but in England and Europe. The deceased was a well-known figure in New York. He had a beautiful residence in Tarrytown, where his last days were spent.]

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Sep 15, 1884

A couple of interesting, related links:

The Poughkeepsie Journal, the second oldest newspaper in the U.S., has a virtual tour. The Foyer is awesome. If you click  on the rectangle furthest  to the right and top, (of the picture at the above link,) you can click on the men in the mural. Robert and Richard Hoe are in the middle of the picture.

Next, an issue of Graham Magazine, published in 1852, has the following article with lots of pictures: PRINTING MACHINE, PRESS, AND SAW WORKS. R. HOE & CO. Click the link above.