Posts Tagged ‘Political Poetry’

To Oppose and Overthrow Political Wrong

November 5, 2012

Image from Big Hair Envy

To oppose and overthrow political wrong, and corruption the people

“Have a weapon firmer set
And better than the bayonet;
A weapon that comes down as still,
As snow flakes fall upon the sod,
But executes a Freeman’s will,
As lightning does the will of God;
And from its force, nor bolts nor rocks
Can shield them — tis the ballot box.”

Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) Aug 9, 1843

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Crow Convention

October 7, 2012

Image from Fergal of Claddagh on Flickr

CROW CONVENTION

So deafening a tumult rose
From out a grove where gathered crows.
I said to Bill: “I fancy that’s
A group of feathered Democrats.”

“Republicans perhaps,” said Bill,
“Or what is even likelier still
So long the clamoring persists
Those inky birds are Communists.”

Convention time and early fall,
A patch of woods the meeting hall.
And all that bickering, I suppose,
About the common rights of crows.

“At times,” said I, “I envy birds,
Denied the privilege of words,
But when the crows convene again
I think how much they are like men.”

Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) Oct 19, 1932

Paste This in Your Hat

June 11, 2012

A Silver Song.

It’s silver, silver, silver
On every ringing side;
On every hand throughout the land
Swift sweeps the silver tide.
There’s a jingle in the cities
And a jingle on the plains,
And all the skies of springtime
Pour down their silver rains!

— Atlanta Constitution.

Freeborn County Standard (Albert Lea, Minnesota) Jun 10, 1896

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Oct 3, 1896

“Free silver” is a phrase that appeals to the shiftless man who is always out of money. The expression seems to him to imply that under a free-silver regime money would be as readily obtainable as the air we breathe. The word “free” always fascinates men who do not go beneath the surface of great problems. “Free lunch.” “free silver,” “free trade,” “free country,” “free rides,” “free speech” — all these variegated expressions come to mean the same thing to many individuals who are not able to get past the adjective to the noun it qualifies.

— New York World.

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Jul 18, 1896

Paste This In Your Hat.
As a republican I am proud of many things, but I can sum up as the highest satisfaction I ever had in the party and its career, that the prospect of republican success never did disturb business. — From Harrison’s Speech.

Bessemer Herald – Oct 3, 1896

The Rape of Democracy.

Poor Democracy’s slate
Is — God save her! — completed.
She has now but to wait
Till the same is defeated.

All their rivals o??-vyin’
In the Jacobine duel,
Mr. Congressman Bryan
And ex-Alderman Sewall

Have been put in command
Of the buccaneer crew,
Who have thoughtfully planned
To make one equal two.

Well may Grover decline,
As the fish spins his reels,
To give out any sign
Of the pity he feels.

Well may men who uphold
Honest methods of trade
Join the standard of gold
Where it flies unafraid.

Well may veterans flee
With a bitter disgust
When their banner they see
Labeled: “Silver or Bust!”

Since the party is cursed
With dishonest intention,
Let the fates do their worst
They can’t beat the convention.

FRANK PUTTNAM.

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Jul 18, 1896

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Jul 18, 1896

A fine ounce of gold is worth $20.67.

Sixteen ounces of silver are worth $11.20.

Congress can legislate until it is black in the face without making the ounce of gold worth less or the sixteen ounces of silver worth more.

— New York Press.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Aug 20, 1896

An ounce of gold is worth $20.67 in the open market; an ounce of silver just 70 cents. Only the law of supply and demand can change their relative values.

Congress is powerless to effect it even if it were clothed with the authority to attempt it.

Cambridge Tribune (Cambridge City, Indiana) Aug 27, 1896

I do not know what you think about it but I believe it is a Good deal better to open the mills of the United States to the labor of America than to open the mints of the United States to the silver of the world. — Major McKinley, at Canton, August 12, 1896.

Bessemer Herald – Oct 17, 1896

The Financial Calendar.

The following financial calendar of the past quarter of a century shows what the leading nations of the world have done with silver during that period:

1871. Germany adopted a gold standard.

1873. Belgium suspended standard silver coinage.

1873. Holland suspended silver coinage.

1873. Denmark adopted a gold standard.

1873. Germany demonetized silver coins.

1873. Norway adopted a gold standard.

1873. Sweden adopted a gold standard.

1873. United States suspended free coinage of silver dollars.

1874. The Latin Union limited their silver coinage.

1875. Suspension of silver coinage in Italy.

1875. Switzerland declined to coin her quota of silver under Latin Union.

1875. Suspension of silver coinage on account of Dutch colonies.

1876. France suspended the coinage of silver.

1877. Finland adopted the gold standard.

1878. Spain suspended the free coinage of silver.

1878. Latin Union suspended coinage of silver except subsidiary coins.

1878. United States resumed coinage of the silver dollar, but on government account.

1879. Austria-Hungary suspended the free coinage of silver.

1885. Egypt adopted a gold standard.

1890. Romania adopted the single gold standard.

1890. United States suspended the coinage of silver dollars and began purchase of bullion.

1891. Gold standard adopted in Tunis.

1892. Austria-Hungary adopted the gold standard.

1893. Mints of India closed to the free coinage of silver.

1893. United States suspended purchase of silver bullion.

1895. Russia decided to coin 100,000,000 gold rubles.

1895. Chile adopted the gold standard.

1895. Costa Rica adopted the gold standard.

1878 1881-1892 — Three international conferences held to try to reestablish the use of silver.

Meantime the United States increased her full legal tender silver 50 fold in the face of a 50 per cent fall in its value, until her credit and financial standing could endure the strain no longer, and she was obliged also, reluctantly, to suspend silver coinage.

What would happen if she were to resume, and open wide the doors of her mints to the discarded silver of the world? It does not require much of a financier to answer that.

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Oct 3, 1896

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Nov 7, 1896

Related Posts:

Girding Their Loins for William Jennings Bryan

William McKinley – Our Martyred President

Cashing in on Political Gold:

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Nov 7, 1896

Wrong Rules the Land, and Waiting Justice Sleeps

May 21, 2012

Image from Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub

MEN

God give us men! A time like this demands
Strong minds, great hearts, true faith, and ready hands;
Men whom the lust of office does not kill;
Men whom the spoils of office can not buy;
Men who possess opinion and a will;
MEN WHO HAVE HONOR — MEN WHO WILL NOT LIE;
Men who can stand before a demagogue,
And damn his treacherous flatteries without winking;
Tall men, sun-crowned, who live above the fog
In public duty and in private thinking —
For while the rabble, with their thumb-worn creeds,
Their large professions and their little deeds,
Mingle in selfish strife, Lo! FREEDOM weeps,
Wrong rules the land, and waiting JUSTICE sleeps.

Richland County Observer (Richland Center, Wisconsin) Apr 1, 1856

The Thinker

February 16, 2012

Image from SOLID Principles Blog

THE THINKER

There’s a fortune in store for the man who can Think
And glory to crown his endeavor;
He can come to renown, who will often sit down
Away from the wise men and clever;
And with reason to guide him will map out a plan
That is best for his country and best for the man.

The thoughtless are many, they swarm in a throng,
But the Thinkers are solemnly few,
But the man at the top, is the man who will stop
To ponder the course he’ll pursue;
And he never attacks any problem of doubt
Before he has carefully thought it all out.

Our country will honor the man who can Think,
For the need of his wisdom is great;
The man unafraid and not easily swayed
Is the man who shall fashion our fate,
For plausible Folly the mob often moves,
But the Thinker considers before he approves.

These are days for the Thinker, there’s much to be done,
And many the dangers to face,
And what seems to be good when it’s all understood
May be ruin and shame and disgrace.
Whenever arises a problem of doubt
For the good of our country let’s reason it out.

(Copyright, 1921, by Edgar A. Guest)

Oakland Tribune, (Oakland, California) Dec 5, 1921

Burial Ground

December 16, 2011

All that lie beneath the markers
Did not long survive the rigors
And the hardships of the climate
Of that Communistic region

Where they miserably perished.
But the headstones in that graveyard
Are a lesson to the people
Of all freedom loving nations.

Rochester Evening Journal (Rochester, New York) Dec 24, 1934

Why Despise the Name of Polk

October 24, 2011

LINES — BY A LADY.

Ah, why despise the name of Polk! —
A name that rhymes so well with folk,
That crowds may rally round this name,
and trust to Polk their country’s fame.
‘Tis a plant used by dames and swains,
To cure their fierce rheumatic pains;
If Uncle Sam is sore beset
Writhing with anguish, pain and debt,
(Worse than disease of joint or limb,)
Surely ’twill health restore to him.

‘Tis said the juice with care preserved,
To flush the cheek with bloom has served,
Since oft in pleasures idle maze,
Nature’s fresh bloom too soon decays.
Ye fair who wish the cheek’s bright glow,
On POLK your favor then bestow.
Surely such halcyon scenes ’twill raise,
As vieing with those fabled days —
The golden age — which poets sing,
New bloom to every cheek will bring.

A simple viand for the poor,
Is this same POLK, who asks for more?
If beauty, health, and food it give,
Let POLK in fame forever live.
When soaring high our eagle proud
Cleaves with its wing the thunder cloud,
In the same talon, bright and keen,
Where the green olive branch is seen,
The imperial bird the POLK shall bear,
High, through the azure field of air.

The Experiment (Norwalk, Ohio) Jul 31, 1844

I WOULD.

I would, if I possessed the most valuable things in this world, and was about to give them away — I would give

Truth, to whig editors.
Merit, to whig candidates.
Common sense, to whig orators.
Justice, to Henry Clay.
Peace, to John Tyler.
The Presidency, to James K. Polk.
Infamy, to the Judge who sentenced Dorr.
Victory, to Democracy.
The spoils, to the victorious.
Salt River, to the Native Whigs.

The Experiment (Norwalk, Ohio) Jul 31, 1844

From the Globe.
TO JAMES K. POLK.

Proud chieftain of democracy —
Lov’d leader of her faithful band! —
Oh! shall no harp resound for thee,
While through this wide-spread land,
From morn till night, a venal crowd, —
By hope of lucre basely won, —
Are worshipping with paeans loud,
A far less worthy son?

Yes! the proud duty shall be mine
To wake my humble harp, and raise
A tribute to a heart like thine;
For whom can camly gaze
Upon thee as thou truly art —
Thine every word and action scan —
And then not own thee, in his heart,
A good and honest man?

THINE eyes ne’er took the murderer’s aim,
As o’er the pistol’s tube they roll’d; —
THY hands ne’er plied the cunning game
To win thy neighbor’s gold; —
THY lips ne’er spake to ask God’s curse
Upon they fellow’s head to fall,
Nor o’pd with revellers to rehearse
Their tales of midnight brawl.

But pure in soul, and bright in mind,
With fearless front and step upright,
Thous standest forth amidst they kind,
A bright and shining light! —
And while one heart is left to fan
The flame on freedom’s altar rear’d,
Stern warrior for the rights of man,
Thy name will be rever’d!

The Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Nov 18, 1844

The Convert’s Experience

October 21, 2011

POLITICAL.

The following song was composed and sung by JOSEPH MORGRIDGE, Esp. of Sangerville, at the Mass Convention recently held in this city, to the great delight of all present.

—–
The Convert’s Experience.
A WHIG SONG.

To leave the dear Locos, and from them to part,
And risk their displeasure, affected my heart,
But yet I in truth, and all candor could say
‘Twas best to elect Frelinghuysen and Clay.

I followed my party through thick and through thin,
To the vortex of ruin, and almost fell in,
But now they no longer, shall lead me astray,
For I will support Frelinghuysen and Clay.

They promised me office, and offered me gold, —
And many a falsehood, to me, they have told,
To lead me along in their favorite way —
Afraid I would join Frelinghuysen and Clay. —

They told me Mechanics and Farmers would thrive
Free trade be extended, and commerce revive,
If they, awhile longer, in office could stay,
To put down the Whigs — Frelinghuysen and Clay.

They wished me to tarry, and not on them frown,
‘Till Polk was elected — the tariff put down;
But if, after that, I no longer would stay,
O, then I might join Frelinghuysen and Clay.

They promised the nation a currency sure,
To keep both together, the rich and the poor,
Down, down with the Banks, every Loco did say,
But never elect Frelinghuysen and Clay.

They told me their secret, I always must keep,
Or, like Morgan*, yet I, might have cause to weep,
But I heeded no threats, and turned from them away,
Resolved to support Frelinghuysen and Clay.

This promise, with others they gravely did make;
That I, of the spoils, should quite largely partake,
But I feared, they, like Tyler, their trust would betray,
So I left them, to join Frelinghuysen and Clay.

Thus all their exertions, my mind to deceive,
Were fruitless and vain; for I could but believe,
That I should have cause, to be proud of the day,
That I left them, to join Frelinghuysen and Clay.

Free trade, Polk and Dallas, I will not go for,
To pay debts for Texas, and buy our her war,
But I’ll work, and I’ll sing, and proudly I’ll say:
I helped to elect Frelinghuysen and Clay.

Let profligate Rulers, be swept by the board;
Our nation, once more, to good health be restored,
And I never will turn for one moment away
From freedom’s true friends — Frelinghuysen and Clay.

The sound of rejoicing is heard on the gale,
The Whigs are triumphant — the Locos look pale,
Their faces grow long, as the field they survey,
Nobly won by the Whigs, Frelinghuysen and Clay.

*The Anti-Mason.

Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) Aug 27, 1844


GREAT WHIG MASS CONVENTION AT CHERRY FIELD ON THE 22d INST. — ALL ‘DOWN EAST’ WIDE AWAKE! [excerpt]

The flag born by the Whigs from Bluehill had the following inscription.

BLUEHILL — ALWAYS READY.

Reverse:

Our country and our country’s cause
Our constitution and our laws
Fro these we hope, for these we pray
For these we’ll vote for Henry Clay.

Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) Aug 27, 1844

Songs for Henry Clay

October 19, 2011

Image from Elektratig blog

The Workingmen’s Song.
Air — “WASHING DAY.”

Times won’t be right its plain to see,
Till Tyler runs his race,
But then we’ll have a better man
To put into his place;
For now we’ll rouse with might and main,
And work, and work, away;
We’ll work, and work, and work, and work,
And put in HENRY CLAY,

Chorus.

For now we’ll rouse with might and main,
And work, and work away;
We’ll work, and work, and work, and work,
and put in HENRY CLAY.

The Farmers want good times again
To sell their wheat and pork,
And so to put in HENRY CLAY,
They’re going right to work;
They’ll plough, and sow, and reap, and mow,
And thresh, and thresh away;
They’ll thresh, and thresh, and thresh, and thresh,
And vote for HENRY CLAY,
They’ll plough and sow, etc., etc.

The Laboring Men they want more work
And higher wages too,
And so they’ll go for HENRY CLAY,
With better times in view;
They’ll saw, and chop, and grub, and dig,
And shovel, and shovel away;
And shovel, and shovel, and shovel, and shovel,
And vote for HENRY CLAY,
They’ll saw, and chop, etc., etc.

The Weavers too will go to work,
For a TARIFF and HENRY CLAY;
They’ll make us all the Cloth we want,
If they can have fair play;
They’ll reel, and spool, and warp, and wind,
And weave, and weave away;
They’ll weave, and weave, and weave, and weave,
And vote for HENRY CLAY,
They’ll reel and spool, etc., etc.

We want no Clothing Ready made,
From England or from France;
We’ve Tailors here who know their trade,
They ought to have a chance;
They’ll cut, and baste, and hem, and press,
And stitch, and stitch away;
They’ll stitch, and stitch, and stitch, and stitch,
And vote for HENRY CLAY,
They’ll cut and baste, etc., etc.

The Coopers know  when Farmers thrive,
Their trade is always best,
And so they’ll go with one accord
For Harry of the West.
They’ll dress, and raise, and truss, and hoop,
And hoop, and hoop away;
They’ll hoop, and hoop, and hoop, and hoop,
And vote for HENRY CLAY,
They’ll dress, and raise, etc., etc.

The Hatters do not want to see
Their kettles standing dry,
And so they’ll go for HENRY CLAY,
And then the Fur will fly,
They’ll nap, and block, and color, and bind,
And finish, and finish away;
They’ll finish, and finish, and finish, and finish,
And vote for HENRY CLAY,
They’ll nap and block, etc., etc.

Shoemakers too, with a right good will,
Will join the working throng,
And what they do for HENRY CLAY,
They’ll do both neat and strong;
They’ll cut, and crimp, and last, and stitch,
And peg and ball away —
They’ll ball, and ball, and ball, and ball,
And vote for HENRY CLAY,
They’ll cut and crimp, etc., etc.

The Blacksmiths too ‘ll roll up their sleeves,
Their sledges they wilt swing,
And at the name of HENRY CLAY,
They’ll make their anvils ring,
They’ll blow, and strike, and forge, and weld,
And hammer, and hammer away;
They’ll hammer, & hammer, & hammer & hammer,
And vote for HENRY CLAY,
They’ll blow, and strike, etc., etc.

The Tanners too will lend a hand,
When skinning time begins;
They are a hardy noble band,
And live by tanning skins;
They’ll bait the Softs, and break the Hards,
And flesh and curry away;
They’ll curry, and curry, and curry, and curry,
And vote for HENRY CLAY,
They’ll bait the softs, etc., etc.

The Potters too are all for CLAY,
For ’tis in CLAY they work;
And all they want is ready pay,
To buy their bread and pork;
They’ll glaze their pots and fire their kilns,
And burn, and burn away —
They’ll burn, and burn, and burn, and burn,
To vote for HENRY CLAY.

The Carpenters, a noble band,
Will then have work to do —
New Barns and Houses through the land,
They’ll raise both strong and new —
They’ll line and score, and scribe and bore,
And brace and build away —
And build, and build, and build, and build,
And vote for HENRY CLAY,
They’ll line and score, etc., etc.

And thus we’ll work, and thus we’ll sing,
Till Tyler’s race is run;
And then we’ll have to fill his place,
Kentucky’s favorite son;
For now we’ll rouse with might and main,
And work, and work away;
We’ll work, and work, and work, and work,
And put in HENRY CLAY,
For now we’ll rouse, etc., etc.

The Ohio Repository (Canton, Ohio) Mar 7, 1844

For the Ohio Repository.

Our Harry Is Coming.
Air — “The Campbels are Coming.

Our Harry is coming, oh Matty beware!
Our Harry is coming, oh Locos take care!
Our Harry is coming, the gallant and free,
He’s coming, he’s coming, oh Matty beware!

Columbia’s shout of ecstacy,
The glorious shouts ring far and free;
Thundering abroad — sublime if rude,
A Nation’s noble gratitude,
Our Harry is coming, &c.

He comes — but in pacific pride;
No battle-band begirts his side,
No hoarse war-drum booms on the wind —
But all is peace and love combined,
Our Harry is coming, &c.

He comes the sacred oath to swear,
Then seated in that awful chair;
Higher than throne, — like Washington —
The laurels on his brow he’s won,
Our Harry is coming, &c.

Our Country’s sav’d — new honors lent,
When CLAY, the People’s President,
Will then to right the helm of state,
And the Republic renovate.
Our Harry is coming, &c.

Canton, March, 1844.   AMELLS.

The Ohio Repository (Canton, Ohio) Mar 14, 1844

The Mill Boy of the Slashes.
Tune — ‘Washing Day,’ or ‘Lucy Long.’

Cheer up, my lads, we’re on the way,
Press onward for the prize;
For at the name of HENRY CLAY,
What glorious hopes arise.

Then hast the day, then clear the way,
As on our hero dashes;
Away! Away! for HARRY CLAY,
“The Mill Boy of the Slashes.”

From East to West — from North to South,
The mails bring cheering news;
The Softs are all down in the mouth;
The Hards have got the blues.

Then haste the day, etc.

Look out, my boys, the Locos know
That truth with  us is found;
and yet with lies they try to show,
That they are gaining ground;

Then hast the day, etc.

Our foes with wonder and with shame,
Now on their forces call;
Then spread abroad our leader’s fame,
Let cliques and cabals fall.

Then haste the day, etc.

The nation’s hope is on him set;
His name’s on every tongue;
Around the land in councils met,
His noble deeds are sung.

Then haste the day, etc.

These stubborn Lokies feel the rod;
Van Buren’s in a fright,
And poor Hard money crawfish To?,
Had rather run than fight.

Then haste the day, etc.

The Ohio Repository (Canton, Ohio) Apr 11, 1844

Ex-Speaker Polk of Tennessee.
TUNE — Dandy Jim of Caroline

Come listen Whigs and Locos all,
Your kind attention here I call,
And mark the burthen of the glee,
Ex-Speaker Polk of Tennessee —
But hark! the People rising say,
He’s not the man to conquer Clay,
This is the substance of their rhyme,
“Clay first, Clay last, Clay all the time.”

Polk’s choice occasioned some surprise,
Good Democrats rolled up their eyes,
Our Candidate, pary, who is he?
Why James *R. Polk of Tennessee —
But hark! &c.

But soon their vast excitement o’er,
They see, what ne’er was seen before,
The best selection that could be,
Ex-Speaker Polk of Tennessee —
But hark! &c.

And then commences nous verrons
To make enthusiasm strong,
Uphold; ye Loco clique, says he,
Ex-Speaker Polk of Tennessee —
But hark! &c.

Fall down before a better man
Than even little Matty Van,
Buchanan too must bow the knee
To Ex-Speaker Polk of Tennessee —
But hark! &c.

Now, not content with this display,
They steal John Tyler’s protege,
Annexing Texas, as you see,
To James K. Polk of Tennessee —
But hark! &c.

Though now a Champion of Free Trade,
Once pon a time a vote you made,
To tax our coffee and our tea,
Ex-Speaker Polk of Tennessee —
But hark! &c.

When last you took the field with Jones,
You heard the People’s angry tones,
A more indignant note you’ll hear,
Before November’s ides appear —
For hark! the People rising say,
Their highest hope is Harry Clay,
This is the substance of their rhyme,
“Clay first, Clay last, Clay all the time.”

_____

*So was the name blazoned on the Loco Foco banners when first announced.

Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) Jun 20, 1844

Something Rich — Truth by Accident.

Locofocoism does not seem to florish well in poetry, as the muses have been so long engaged in the worthy and truthful cause of the patriotic Whigs, that when compelled to do service for Locofocoism will indirectly sift in the truth. —

We were greatly amused last evening in looking over a song in the Democrat, that will be generally circulated this morning. We hope our friends will secure a copy as a poetical and political curiosity. It is decidedly rich, and we think the editor of the Democrat must have had no little grass in his boots to have admitted the truth telling little witch!

Here is the song and the reader will please read the italicised letters first.

For the Democrat.

YOUNG HICKORIES.
TUNE. — Old Rosin the Bow.

1
Come all ye young Hickories rally!
Let’s shoulder to shoulder unite,
Against the coon forces we’ll sally,
Young Hickory” leads in the fight.

CHORUS.

Young Hickory leads in the fight, (Repeat.)
Against the coon forces we’ll rally,
“Young Hickory” leads in the fight.

2
We’ll raise up our Hickory poles, hearties,
In Honor of Tennessee’s son,
Let us show him that firmly each heart is
Leagued together to use up the coon,

CHORUS.

Leagued together to use up the coon, (repeat)
Let us show him that each heart is
Leagued together to use up the coon.

3
The feds of their strength loud and bragging,
Renewing of ’40 the trash,
In November the coons we’ll be flogging,
Until he shall fly from the lash.

Chorus.

4
Mark his hide with each blow that you deal him
Place the licks on his carcase with skill,
Hurrah! then, e’en “Huysen” can’t heal him,
Amen, with a hearty good will.

Chorus.
5
Polk and Dallas inscribed on our banners,
Shall to victory marshal our way;
Be up then — let feds shout hozannas,
Defeated they’ll be with their Clay.

Chorus.

Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) Jun 25, 1844

Image from the National Archives website

From the Whig Standard.

SONG.

In the times of the Revolution;
While yet the land was young;
Heavy the lot of the hardy few,
But the will was stout and strong,
Of those who fought with Washington;
On their fields of fame they died,
All true men, like you men,
Remember them with pride.

At daybreak at old Trenton,
On Monmouth’s sandy plain,
In the swamp of the Yellow Santeo,
On the waves of old Champlain,
Fought the Whigs of the Resolution,
With hearts unchanging still,
And we men — if free men —
So must we fight — we will!

and some of these remain, boys!
Through all that sturdy storm,
Bent, and worn out, and aged,
But hearts still young and warm;
They should know what are true principles,
These men with locks of gray,
They are few men — but true men —
And they vote with us for Clay.

Honor unto the aged,
The old true-hearted brave!
Theirs be a free and pleasant death,
And a free and quiet grave;
And still we’ll protect the principles
For which they toiled so long,
The Whigs of the Revolution
Who fought when the land was young.
———

From the Whig Standard.

A NEW SONG.
TUNE — Yankee Doodle.

The Locos met at Baltimore,
To make their nominations,
With tempers sour’d, and feeling sore,
And humbled expectations.
But Locofocos keep it up,
Heed not the Whig’s rejoicing,
Don’t yield the day to HENRY CLAY
Nor yet to FRELINGHUYSEN.

They felt that VAN, was not the man,
To lead them on to glory,
And should they pass, to LEWIS CASS,
‘Twould end in the same story.
But Locofocos keep it up, &c., &c.

JOHNSON they knew, would never do,
BUCHANAN’s chance was small, sir,
They fear’d each vote, would but denote,
They’d make no choice at all, sir.
But Locofocos keep it up, &c., &c.

Though this they fear’d, they persevered,
Seven times the vote was taken!
On the eighth, for a joke, they started POLK,
Hoping to save their bacon;
Then Locofocos keep it up, &c., &c.

JOHNSON withdrew, BUCHANAN too,
VAN BUREN flew the track, sir,
All own they’re beat, POLK wins the heat,
Though a fourth rate party hack, sir,
But Locofocos keep it up &c.

The Loco’s now were run aground,
To find another man, as
Weak as POLK, but at last they found
His match in GEORGE M. DALLAS,
Then Locofocos keep it up, &c.

Then for POLK and DALLAS go it strong,
Each Locofoco hearty,
With guns, and drums, and noise, and song,
Let’s cheer our drooping party,
Ye Locofocos keep it up, &c.

We’ve done our best pray be content,
We’ve made a nomination,
And POLK and DALLAS we present
For the people’s acceptation.
Then Locofocos keep it up, &c.

John Jones says TYLER was by law
The “second: nominated,
That POLK, being third, he must ‘withdraw,’
‘Or the party’ll be defeated.’
John Jones and Tyler keep it up, &c.

The people thank you, gentlemen,
But its far from their intentions,
To vote for the third and fourth rate men
You’ve named in your conventions!
For loud and long, like thunder strong,
The people’s voice is rising,
And ’twill be given before High Heaven,
For CLAY AND FRELINGHUYSEN.

South Port American (South Port, Wisconsin) Jun 29, 1844

From the New York Tribune.

HENRY CLAY.

He wears no crown upon that brow which gleams in Freedom’s van,
Where every god has set his seal to show the world a man;
Nor bears he in his trusty hand the warrior’s spear and glaive,
Whose harvests are the falling ranks that burden ruin’s grave.

But prouder than the proudest king, whose million vassals bow,
He wears the wreath a Nation’s hand has twined upon his brow;
And peerless o’er his fallen foes with flaming plume and crest,
He shines among a Nation’s stars the brightest and the best.

His name is not a sculptured thing, where old Renown has reared
Her marble in the wilderness, by smoke of battle seared;
But graven on life-leaping hearts where Freedom’s banners wave,
It gleams to bid the tyrant back, and loose the fettered slave.

His deeds are not of blood and wrong, where ruth, with iron hand,
Has yoked the stormy steeds of War, to desolate the land —
But ever in the hour of need, when Danger’s summons came,
He lent the thunder of his word, the halo of his name!

Around the hearths and altars where his country’s gods are shrined,
His heart has yearned for Freedom’s weal, with Freedom’s toil his mind;
And when from other lands oppressed the captive’s wail has rung,
His soul went forth in Freedom’s strength, with Freedom’s fire his tongue.

Above the altar’s of the Greek, and o’er Bolivia’s fane,
His name, “Deliverer,” is stampt upon the broken chain.
And from those old and glorious isles that gem the AEgean sea,
The sons of Spartans hail in song the Champion of the Free.

And now, when age in on his heart, and dimness in his eye,
He wanes not with the fitful lights that darken in the sky,
But prouder still in name and fame, with flaming plume and crest,
He shines among a Nation’s stars the brightest and the best!

O.D.S.

Huron Reflector ( Norwalk, Ohio) Sep 4, 1849

Marching to Victory

September 29, 2011

A Campaign Song.
Tune — ‘Rose of Alabama’ [YouTube song with lyrics]

I.
Come, all you doubting, pouting chaps, who go about as mourners
Come, wipe the tear drops from your eyes, stop crying on the corners
Come along, with shout and song, go it while you’re able,
Our Ben we’ll put in the White House, boys, you bet it, boys, we’re able.

II.
Yes, come, ye troubled hearted ones, stop croaking on the corners
With the red bandana wipe your eyes, til just the thing for mourners
And come along, with shout and song, go it while you’re able,
Our Ben we’ll put in the White House, boys, you bet it boys, we’re able.

III.
Now wring your red bandanas out, wipe off the tears of mourners
And shout for Ben and Levi, shout, don’t boo-hoo on the corners
And come along, with shout and song, go it while you’re able,
Our Ben we’ll put in the White House boys, you bet it, boys, we’re able.

IV.
Yet keep those red bandanas dry, for other weeping mourners,
November’s storm will surely bring great weeping on the corners
But come along, with shout and song, go it while you’re able,
Our Ben we’ll put in the White House, boys, you bet it, boys, we’re able.

[Most respectfully dedicated to the disgusted investors in the red bandana]
L.F.M.

Decatur Republican (Decatur, Illinois) Aug 16, 1888

Hebrews for Harrison.

At a recent Republican meeting in Waterloo, Iowa, Mr. Munger stated that he had seen a notice of the formation of a Hebrew Republican club in Cleveland, and to verify the truth of the report had written to the president of the club. The answer received was as follows:

“CLEVELAND, OHIO, August 16. — I.C. Munger, Esp., Waterloo, Iowa, — Dear Sir: You favor of the 14th at hand and contents noted. Yes, sir, the item as quoted in the Chicago Tribune of August 11, gives the facts in the case with one exception — instead of the club having fifty members, it is composed of eighty-five members, and every one of them heretofore voted solidly the Democratic ticket. The W.J. Hart Club was formed some three or four years ago and did valuable work for the Democratic party, but as the Democratic party is now controlled by one man, Grover Cleveland, an out-and-out free trader, and as the party itself has indorsed free trade, we, the Hebrews of the city, and particularly the W.J. Hart Club with its eighty-five members, have come out solidly for Harrison and Morton and protection. Trusting to hear soon from you as to your politics, I am, yours truly,
H. LEVY, No. 38 Race Street.

The reading of the letter called forth long-continued applause.

Decatur Republican (Decatur, Illinois) Aug 30, 1888

Have You Heard from Maine?

It went utterly,
For Governor Burleigh,
And Tippecanoe and Morton, too,
And Grover’s a used up man.

———
WHAT the Democrats are thankful for — that there are no more state elections before November.
———
THE Republicans only elected four congressmen in Maine. They might have done better if there had been more to vote for.

Decatur Republican (Decatur, Illinois) Sep 13, 1888

Marching to Victory.

The following song was sung by Prof Gilhland, of Fairmont, before the Danville Republican club, and a resolution was passed that it be published.

CAMPAIGN SONG — “MARCHING TO VICTORY”
Air — “Marching Through Georgia” [YouTube link]

We shall sing the good old doctrine, boys, our fathers taught before,
Protection to the workingman, good wages for the poor,
We’ll drive the free trade sophistry back to England’s shore,
For we are marching to vict’ry

CHORUS
Hurrah, hurrah for Harrison, the true,
Hurrah, hurrah for Levi Morton, too,
We have Joe Joe Fifer on the track and intend to run him through,
For we are marching to vict’ry.

Cleveland is a two-faced man, as all do plainly see,
We are weary of his vetoes and his free trade heresy,
He can’t deceive us longer with his civil service plea,
For we are marching to vict’ry.

CHORUS
Hurrah, hurrah for Harrison, the true,
Hurrah, hurrah for Levi Morton, too
We’ve Gen. Pavey on the track and intend to run him through
For we are marching to vict’ry.

The President proposed a mess of Canada free fish,
But the catch was not as good as he most ardently did wish
And it happened that the Senators did not admire the dish
For they are marching to vict’ry.

CHORUS
Hurrah, hurrah for Harrison, the true
Hurrah, hurrah for Levi Morton, too
We have George Hunt upon the track and intend to run him through,
For we are marching to vict’ry.

The boys in blue were brave and true on many a well fought field,
They faced full many a danger while they were the Nation’s shield
They captured many a rebel flag which they’re not disposed to yield,
For we are marching to vict’ry.

CHORUS
Hurrah, hurrah for Harrison the true
Hurrah, hurray for Levi Morton, too
We have Joe Cannon on the track and intend to run him through,
For we are marching to vict’ry.

There is music in the air, my boys, I hear its joyful sound,
From east and west and north and south, to the Nation’s utmost bound
And we’ll bury Grover Cleveland deep beneath his free-trade mound,
For we are marching to vict’ry.

CHORUS
Hurrah, hurrah for Harrison the true
Hurrah, hurrah for Levi Morton, too
For every man we’ve on the track we’re bound to get first through,
For we are marching to vict’ry.

Decatur Republican (Decatur, Illinois) Sep 20, 1888

How Big is Grover!

How big is Grover Cleveland, pa,
That people call him great?
Is he as large as brainy Ben,
The favorite candidate?
Oh, yes, my son; he weighs a ton;
‘Tis mostly gall or fat,
He was a No. 19 collar
And a little Tom Thumb hat.

Decatur Republican (Decatur, Illinois) Sep 27, 1888