Posts Tagged ‘Progressives’

“I Will Make the Corporations Come to Time!”

December 6, 2011

Cartoon by Robert Minor in St. Louis Post-Dispatch (1911). Karl Marx surrounded by an appreciative audience of Wall Street financiers: John D. Rockefeller, J. P. (Pontifex Maximus) Morgan, (Pontifex Maximus), John D. Ryan of National City Bank, and Morgan partner George W. Perkins. Immediately behind Karl Marx is Teddy Roosevelt, leader of the Progressive Party.

Image and caption from Reformation Online

In the New York Evening Post of Friday, August 26, there appeared in an editorial article the following statements:

“I will make the corporations come to time!” shouted Roosevelt to the mob. But did he not really mean that he would make them come down with the cash to elect him, as he did before? For a man with Mr. Roosevelt’s proved record it is simply disgusting humbug for him to rant about the corporations upon whose treasurers he fawned when he was President and wanted their money for his campaign. Does he think that nobody has a memory which goes back to the life insurance investigations, and that everybody has forgotten the $50,000 taken from widows and orphans and added to Theodore Roosevelt’s political corruption fund? Did he not take a big check from the beef trust, and glad to get it? And now he is going to make the corporations come to time! One can have respect for a sincere radical, for an honest fanatic, for an agitator, or leveler, who believes that he is doing God’s will, but it is hard to be patient with a man who talks big but acts mean, whose eye is always to the main chance politically, and who lets no friendship, no generosity, no principle, no moral scruple stand for a moment between himself and the goal upon which he has set his overmastering ambitions. *  *  *

This champion of purity, this roarer for political virtue, is the man who was for years, when in public life, hand in glove with the worst political corruptionists of his day; who toadied to Platt, who praised Quay, who paid court to Hanna; under him as President, Aldrich rose to the height of his power, always on good terms with Roosevelt, it was Roosevelt who, in 1906, wrote an open letter urging the re-election of Speaker Cannon, against whom mutterings had then begun to rise; it was Roosevelt who asked Harriman to come to the White House secretly, who took his money to buy votes in New York, and who afterward wrote to “My Dear Sherman” — yes the same Sherman — reviling the capitalist, to whom he had previously written, saying, “You and I are practical men.”

The Washington Post (Washington, D.C.) Sep 1, 1910

A More Radical Roosevelt

December 6, 2011

A MORE RADICAL ROOSEVELT.

In referring to the recent speech of former President Roosevelt at the old home of John Brown in Osawatomie, Kas., the Cleveland Leader says that the trend of Mr. Roosevelt’s thought and feeling is in the direction of more radicalism and that he certainly is not changing in the direction of conservatism.

The Leader further says:

The main difference is in Mr. Roosevelt’s clearer recognition of the fact that such regulation of the amassing and use of wealth as he advocates would necessarily carry government interference with private and corporate property farther than it has yet gone, in America. He perceives this plainly and accepts it as a natural and unavoidable consequence of the changes which he would bring about.

It is not new to advocate a graduated income tax, or an inheritance tax of like nature. The country has long understood that Roosevelt favors both. The point which stands out in the Osawatomie speech is the explicit declaration for a “policy of a far more active governmental interference with social and economic conditions in this country than we have yet had.” Theodore Roosevelt does not talk like that for nothing. He does not say such things without due consideration, especially in a set speech, prepared in advance.

Clearly there is a drift toward radicalism the extent and ultimate consequences of which cannot be foreseen. That it will have a potent effect upon the political history of the next few years cannot be doubted by anyone accustomed to observing and measuring the influences at work in the United States, politically and socially, and in the great field of industry and commerce.

It may well give us pause. What the outcome of this extreme radicalism will be none may know. We do not lack for the spirit of unrest now. In fact it is too generally prevalent. There is always a large portion of mankind that is dissatisfied. Some men are never contented to see others more prosperous than themselves and are disposed to argue that the energy, industry, thrift, study, incessant work and development of other men to not count, but that success is a matter of “luck,” or of somebody’s injustice to his fellows.

And this element of our population is one that needs no encouragement, but rather curbing. It is this same element that hails with delight indiscriminate criticism of the courts, and is particularly pleased if a noted citizen may even go so far as to attack the supreme court, which is the very guardian of the Constitution which is absolutely the law of the people.

We may well make haste slowly in the matter of radicalism.

Mansfield News (Mansfield, Ohio) Sep 2, 1910

Opposed to Cartoons

October 21, 2010

This 1898 cartoon reminded me of the “Everybody Draw Mohammed Day” earlier this year. As stated in the caption, Homer Davenport was a prominent cartoonist.  I wonder if he would have drawn Mohammed:

 

Homer Davenport

From Wikipedia:

Homer Calvin Davenport (March 8, 1867 – May 2, 1912) was a political cartoonist  from the United States. He was known for his satirical drawings and support of Progressive Era politics. A native Oregonian, he would work for several West Coast newspapers before going to work for William Randolph Hearst and the New York Evening Journal. He also was one of the first American breeders of Arabian horses.

 

Also from Wiki:

Haleb, the “Pride of the Desert,” imported to America by Davenport in 1906.

Both images from Wiki entry for Homer Davenport as well.

More on the political cartoons and anti-cartoon bill HERE.

Presidents’ Day Feature: Ronald Reagan

February 15, 2010

From the Sitka Sentinel (Sitka, Alaska) Nov 5, 1980

For President’s Day, a Ronald Reagan montage: It’s just some  random things  leading up to his Landslide Presidential Victory.  The “objectivity” of these articles makes them entertaining to read; it’s really a wonder he ever got elected to anything. Evidently,  the people could read between the lines.

Gov. Ronald Reagan (Image from http://courses.csusm.edu)

$6.74 Billion Calif. Budget Proposed By Gov. Reagan

By BILL STALL
Associated Press Writer

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP)

Gov. Ronald Reagan proposed Tuesday a spartan $6.74 billion state budget which avoids a tax increase mainly by slashing the rate of welfare spending by $700 million annually.

Reagan told the California Legislature that “something must be done and done immediately” about soaring welfare and health care costs.

Proposed welfare spending in Reagan’s budget totals $2.2 billion. The state’s share would be 676.5 million — down $65.2 million from the current year.

The Republican governor’s proposed 1971-72 budget, 2 percent larger than the current one, cuts spending in many areas, hold the University of California to the current $337 million of state support and denies state workers the annual cost-of-living salary increases they have enjoyed for the past decade.

HEAVIER TEACHER LOAD

Reagan told the state’s college and university faculty members they would have to spend more time teaching to handle a heavier classroom load.

Reagan predicted in an address to the Republican state convention Sunday the budget would bring “resistance and cries of anguish.”

Referring to welfare, he said “When many snouts are threatened with forcible withdrawal from the public trough, it makes waves.”

Reagan shunned both the deficit financing of President Nixon’s new federal budget and new taxes such as those proposed by New York Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller to balance his state’s $8.45 billion budget.

FACES BIG PROBLEM

California had a bigger state budget than New York when Reagan first took office four years ago.

The Republican governor faces major problems in getting the budget, and its companion reform legislation, through a legislature controlled by Democrats: 43 to 37 in the Assembly and 20 to 19 in the Senate.

Reagan will propose administrative and legislative changes that will cut welfare spending by a projected $606 million of state, county and federal funds in the budget year beginning July 1. This will be done by tightening up on eligibility and doing away with a number of allowances considered by the Reagan administration to be frills. Details will be revealed in a welfare message to go to the legislature soon.

To save another $100 million, Reagan will ask the legislature to cut back the free health care given by the state to 2.5 million welfare recipients and medically needy in California’s Medi-Cal program.

Reagan proposes to limit Medi-Cal spending to what an average citizen who pays for his own health needs lays out during a year. This is estimated at about $300 by state officials. California has been paying an average $517 for each Medi-Cal patient, Reagan said.

The Gettysburg Times (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Feb 3, 1971

Image from the Graham Owen Gallery

Reagan Prepares For “Hawk” Tour

By BILL BOYARSKY

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) —

Gov. Ronald Reagan is getting ready for his first nationwide political tour as a full-fledged hawk on Vietnam and closer then ever to campaigning actively for the Republican presidential nomination.

Less than three weeks before his speechmaking trip through Illinois, South Carolina and Wisconsin, Reagan made his toughest statement so far on the war, asking for a sharp escalation.

“I don’t think the full technological power of the United States is being used,” Reagan told a news conference Tuesday.

He said he didn’t think nuclear weapons are needed to win but insisted “the enemy should be frightened that we might” use them.

The Gettysburg Times (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Sep 13, 1967

Brown: Reagan ‘Last Hope’ of Extremists

Gubernatorial Nominee Likened to Death Valley

SACRAMENTO (UPI) — Gov. Edmund G. Brown Sunday attacked his Republican opponent, actor-politician Ronald Reagan, as “the best and perhaps last hope” of right wing extremists for an attractive candidate who shares their philosophy.

In a speech prepared for a meeting of the Democratic State Central Committee, Brown said Reagan’s backers include ultra-conservatives from throughout the nation, not just California.

“They will spend whatever they must, and they will resort to whatever tactics they must,” the Democratic governor said.

“And they will do this because they know that Ronald Reagan is their best and perhaps last hope of inflicting on this nation a revolution of the right.”

Gov. Edmund G. Brown Sr. (Image from http://courses.csusm.edu)

Ignored Fight

Brown’s text concentrated on Reagan and ignored a bitter fight for selection of a new Democratic state chairman.

Committee members, almost 1,000 of them, were to choose between Mrs. Carmen Warschaw and Assemblyman Charles Warren, both of Los Angeles.

Brown is backing Mrs. Warschaw, currently the party’s southern California chairman. Lt. Gov. Glenn M. Anderson and most of the liberal wing are supporting Warren.

Supporters of Mrs. Warschaw have warned delegates that a Warren victory would be interpreted as a slap in the face of the governor. [SLAP! They chose Warren]

Brown said Reagan was trying to gloss over his earlier right-wing pronouncements. But the governor said Democrats would not let him do so.


Death Valley (Image from http://www.tripadvisor.com)

‘Quaint Place”

“The people are going to find that Mr. Reagan’s philosophy is not unlike the landscape of Death Valley — threatening, barren and forbidding. And they will not let him remodel California in that image. Death Valley might be a quaint place to visit — but who wants to live there?”

(In Santa Monica, Reagan told a news conference Saturday the Democrats were trying to tie an extremist label on him ‘because they don’t dare run on their record.”)

The governor’s prepared remarks made no mention of his proposal, unveiled Saturday, for creation of a bipartisan committee to study the controversial Rumford Open Housing Law and recommend amendments or a substitute.

Platform

The Democratic state convention, in a platform adopted a few hours after the governor made the proposal, ignored it completely.

The platform said Democrats were “ready at all times to amend or improve” civil rights laws including the Rumford Act which prohibits racial discrimination in the sale or rental of housing.

But it said the party opposes repeal of any of the laws against discrimination.

In another speech prepared for the central committee, Democratic National Committeeman Eugene L. Wyman said Reagan was basing his campaign on information fed to him by “the behavioral scientists, the pollsters and the public relations experts.”

“They tell him the Rumford Act is unpopular, and Mr. Reagan calls for its repeal,” Wyman said. “They probe for the hidden fears and prejudices of the people, and Mr. Reagan goes on television to exploit those deep-seated emotions as coldly and cynically as the extremists of the left and right who would rule by mass manipulation of the mobs.”

Nevada State Journal (Reno, Nevada) Aug 15,  1966

California GOP Leaders Fear Future

Don’t Like Reagan For Governor but Have No Candidate

WASHINGTON —

Republican fat cats met secretly in Los Angeles Dec. 17 to hear an audacious proposal from money men backing moderate George Christopher, former Mayor of San Francisco, for governor.

Christopher’s bankrollers agreed that unrestrained blood-spilling in primary elections has helped debilitate the Republican party in California. Instead of another expensive primary, they continued, the money men should agree on one candidate for Governor: George Christopher.

The audacity of this proposal stems from the fact that in statewide polls, Christopher runs far behind Hollywood actor Ronald Reagan, darling of California’s Goldwater movement. Naturally then, Reagan’s financial backer were not about to capitulate. The Dec. 17 meeting adjourned with nothing accomplished.

End Of an Era

This story illustrates the desperate straits of California moderate Republicans trying to salvage the Hiram JohnsonEarl Warren tradition in their party. The increasingly likely nomination of Reagan might well destroy whatever remains of that tradition. Yet, leading moderates looked to that Dec. 17 meeting as a last hope of beating Reagan by cutting away financial support.

Reliance on so doubtful a maneuver is part of the Cherry Orchard syndrome. After Barry Goldwater’s nomination in 1964, journalist Murray Kempton compared anti-Goldwater moderates to the impoverished Russian aristocrats in Chekhov’s play, “The Cherry Orchard” — foolishly waiting for somebody to save them as they edged inexorably toward the abyss. The Cherry Orchard analogy is equally applicable to California today.

Looked to Kuchel

Although Reagan’s candidacy was building all through 1965, the moderates waited for somebody to save them — specifically, for Sen. Thomas Kuchel to come home and run for governor. Kuchel, Earl Warren’s last political protege, kept the hope alive by refusing to say yes or no. when he finally said no in September, the moderates were left with Christopher.

A progressive who was an excellent mayor of San Francisco, Christopher failed to catch on in populous southern California during two previous losing statewide races. Many moderates believed aggressive, young state Rep. Robert Monagan, Republican leader of the state assembly, would run better against Reagan.

So progressive and excellent, he couldn’t get elected anywhere other than San Francisco!

Monagan has been the subject of a low-paced build-up since September (coming to Washington last month to see officials of the Council of Republican Organizations, a national coalition of moderate groups.) But so long as the better-known Christopher is running, Monagan is stymied.

Here again the Cherry Orchard mentality was at work. Some moderates hoped Kuchel would convince Christopher to step aside for Monagan. Based on a cordial private conversation between Richard M. Nixon and Monagan in September, other moderates hoped Nixon would do the same. These were but dreams.

Nowadays, there are even Zombies in The Cherry Orchard!  If we only had a Zombie Reagan, we could save the Cherry Orchard.

Seek Nixon’s Help

With Monagan’s candidacy still-born and Christopher determined to run hard, California’s Cherry Orchard moderates now are seeking outside help for Christopher from two influential members of the party’s old Nixon wing: Sen. George Murphy and former Nixon aide Robert Finch. Neither has much us for Reagan. Either could do him damage.

It is, however, naive to believe either will Murphy, who upset Pierre Salinger in 1964 as an apostle of party unity, sticks to that theme.The highly astute Finch is not likely to endanger his unimpeded road to the nomination for lieutenant governor and an excellent chance against the weak Democratic incumbent by attacking Reagan.

This leaves many moderates reduced to the wish that Christopher’s money men somehow will talk Reagan’s money men into quitting. They are praying Reagan will drop, or at least fail to gain in the next statewide opinion polls. Christopher’s fat cats then could argue that the polls prove Reagan has only hard-core right wing support and would be a goner against Democratic Gov. Pat Brown.

This is relying on providence. Reagan instead relies on his political management firm, Spencer, Roberts and Associates, which plans for Reagan to announce his candidacy on the same day California pollsters will have interviewers in the field. The reason publicity generated by Reagan’s announcement will help him in the polls.

Forgetting Reagan’s neanderthal ideology,** nobody can say his campaign hasn’t outplanned, out-thought, and outfought the Chekhovesque moderates. It’s 1964 all over again.

(Copyright 1965)

Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Jan 5, 1966

** NEANDERTHAL?  No journalistic bias there!

Post Crescent (Appleton, WI) Jun 3, 1965

Kinda funny, the paper’s name is the Post Crescent. Supposedly, this paper leans right, according to MondoTimes. Based on the preceding article from the Post Crescent, that doesn’t really appear to be the case.

From the Coshocton Tribune (Coshocton, OH) Nov 16, 1947

Who doesn’t love Shirley Temple?

1941

Ronald Reagan and Jane Wyman peddle cigarettes, and look so good doing it!

From the Nevada State Journal (Reno, NV) Aug 11, 1939

A hint of things to come? “To Keep You Safe, They Risk Their Lives!”

Ronald Reagan, the Life Saver!

From the Lima News (Lima, OH) Jul 3, 1937