Posts Tagged ‘Racism’

Awake! Arise! or be Forever Fallen!

June 16, 2012

POLITICAL.

Will the country have Grant and peace, or Seymour and Blair and pieces.

General Grant crushed the rebellion. The present political contest is the endeavor of the rebellion to crush him.

The song of Seymour: “I’m afloat, I’m afloat!” The echo of Blair: “I’m a bloat. I’m a bloat!” — Chicago Post.

A Democratic paper delight to call Gen. Grant a despot. What kind of a pot, pray, is Frank Blair? — Hartford Post.

“The authority of a mob is equal to that of a Government.” –{Horatio Seymour, July, 4, 1863.}

The Law Caws. — the crowing of the copperhead cocks over the Kentucky election.

The Hartford Post perpetrates the following: Frank Blair’s “best hold” — to hold his tongue.

The Democratic papers declare that “Blair says what he means.” What does he mean when he says “er cons-ush’n mus’ be per’-suvd.”

Some of the seditious Southerners declare if Seymour is not elected they will leave the country. That is one of the strongest arguments for the election of Grant.

The World is anxious to discover a whisky meeter. The best whisky meeter we know of is Frank Blair. He meets it many times a day, but never allows it to pass him.

The Hillsdale Standard (Hillsdale, Michigan) Aug 25, 1868

“RED, WHITE AND BLUE.”

BY N.A. GRAY

The bullet and ballot change places,
The vote is our weapon once more,
The grey-coat is gone, but the faces
Are those we encountered before.
Our lines are again put in motion,
By Grant, who is able and true;
We will rally from ocean to ocean,
And stand by the “red, white and blue.”

A thousand torn soldiers at Dayton,
Are robbed of their vote by the foe;
A deed that sends blushes to satan,
And shames all the demons below.
The black man who fights and pays tax, too,
And those who their studies pursue,
Shall stand up by Grant and Colfax, too,
And Honor the “red, white and blue.”

Our Grant, the school-boy of Ravenna,
The Buckeye, we follow with pride,
With Colfax, of proud Indiana,
So worthy to stand by his side,
Warns Seymour and Blair to remember,
The red, white and [red] will not do;
We’ll meet them, the 8d of November,
And give them the “red, white and blue.”

Elyria Independent Democrat (Elyria, Ohio) Sep 9, 1868

Cedar Falls Gazette (Cedar Falls, Iowa) Sep 18, 1868

Who are Democrats?

The President, Vice President, and every member of the rebel Government, was a Democrat.

Every soldier, who, after being educated at the expense of the government basely deserted the flag of his country and took up arms against it was a Democrat.

Every member of both branches of the rebel Congress, was a Democrat.

Every man in the North who sympathized with traitors and treason in the South, during the late civil war was a Democrat.

Every cut-throat and murderer who shot down and starved defenseless Union prisoners of war, was a Democrat.

Every General, Colonel and officer in the Confederate army was a Democrat.

Every person who rejoiced at the assassination of Abraham Lincoln was a Democrat.

Every draft rioter, sneak and bounty jumper was a Democrat.

Every person who wrote letters to the army encouraging soldiers to desert their comrades, was a Democrat.

Every person who was sad when the Union army triumphed, was a Democrat.

Every person who assailed the “lawful money” of the country and the national credit was a Democrat.

Every person engaged in the massacre of Union soldiers at Fort Pillow, was a Democrat.

Every person who murdered an enrolling officer was a Democrat.

Every person engaged in the Sons of Liberty conspiracy to murder the Executive and overthrow the Government was a Democrat.

Every person in the North who opposed conferring suffrage upon Union Soldiers in the field, was a Democrat.

Every person who encouraged and protected deserters was a Democrat.

Every person who refused to contribute to the relief of sick and wounded soldiers, was a Democrat.

Every person who declared that he “would like to see all Democrats unite in a bold and open resistance to all attemps to keep our a united people” was a Democrat.

Every person who was in favor of “two republics and a united South” was a Democrat.

Every person who was anxious to know whether the “South had resources enough to keep the Union army at bay” was a Democrat.

Every person who denied the authority of the general government to enforce its laws was a Democrat.

Every person who recognized the rebellion as “legitimate, legal and just,” was a Democrat.

Every man who shouted “not another man nor another dollar to carry on a civil war,” was a Democrat.

Every man who insulted the loyal armies of the Union by declaring “the war a failure” was a Democrat.

Every person who invented dangerous compounds to burn our steamboats and Northern cities was a Democrat.

Every person who contrived hellish schemes to introduce the wasting pestilence of yellow fever into northern cities, was a Democrat.

Every person who robbed the school fund and used the money for gold gambling operations, was a Democrat.

Every person who engaged in shooting down negroes in the streets, and burning negro school-houses, was a Democrat.

Every person who burned up negro children in Orphan Asylums, was a Democrat.

Every officer in the army who was dismissed for cowardice and disloyalty was a Democrat.

Every man who denounced Union soldiers as “Lincoln hirelings,” was a Democrat.

Every man who denounced greenbacks as “Lincoln skins,” was a Democrat.

Every person who asserted that “Lincoln bayonets were shouldered for cold blooded murder,” was a Democrat.

Every man, who during the war asserted that the republic was “dying! dying!! dying!!!” was a Democrat.

Every person who conspired to release rebel prisoners and burn northern cities, was a Democrat.

Every member of the Ku-Klux-Klan is a Democrat.

Booth, the assassin, was a Democrat.

Seymour, who addressed a murderous mob as “my friends,” is a Democrat.

General Forrest, the Fort Pillow butcher, is a Democrat.

Wirz, the murderer of Union Soldiers, was a Democrat.

Dr. Blackburn is a Democrat.

Dr. Mudd, Payne, Alzerott and Mrs. Surratt were Democrats.

Wade Hampton, Jeff. Thompson and Beauregard, are Democrats.

Fernando Wood, his brother Ben, the gambler, and John Morrissey, are Democrats.

Renegade Doolittle is a Democrat.

Bowles, Milligan, Horsey, Heffron and Humphries, are Democrats.

John C. Walker and Dick Dodd, are Democrats.

Old “grandmother Welles” is a Democrat.

Clement L. Vallandigham is a Democrat.

Jeff. Davis, Brick Pomeroy, and the Devil are Democrats.

Indianapolis Journal.

Elyria Independent Democrat (Elyria, Ohio) Sep 30, 1868

Grand Traverse Herald (Traverse City, Michigan) Sep 6, 1868

Address Extraordinary.

TO THE DEMOCRACY OF PENNSYLVANIA.

(After the manner of Wallace.)

Hdqurs.State Central Kuklux,}
Harrisburg, Pa., Sept. 2, 1868.}

DEMOCRATS — Did you hear the reveille rolling in Vermont, on Tuesday?

Awake! Arise! or be forever fallen!

The Green Mountain boys kept quiet and noiseless, but they were lying in their trenches, and when we struck them, we felt their deadly musketry.

Danger threatens! The tyrant Grant will succeed the tyrant Lincoln. The mud sills, hirelings, carpet-baggers, minions, are rising in their strength as they rose in 1861.

Unless we carry Pennsylvania now, by foul means or fair, hope is gone.

The lost cause will be lost again.

The stars and bars will be folded forever.

Peace will reign.

The national debt will be paid.

The soldiers’ bounties will be paid.

The widows’ pensions will be paid.

The soldiers’ orphans’ schools will be endowed.

Gold will go down, credit will go up.

Prosperity and plenty will abound.

DEMOCRATS OF PENNSYLVANIA!

HOLD YOUR WAVERING LINES!

STEADY! STEADY! STEADY!

Defend nothing, for you cannot defend yourselves.

More money! More money! More money!

Advance the price of votes.

More coffee-stained naturalization papers.

More Father Tracys.

More murdered John Caseys, if the Irishmen ‘peach.

More John S. Kelleys, if they get frightened.

More Schuykill-county prothonetaries.

More “active Democrats.”

More railroad colonies.

Work! Work! Work! Direct your appeals to the passions, prejudices, and ignorance of the worse classes! Stir up the just-landed Irish against the nagurs!

Rally the White Boys of Bedford street! Bespatter the enemy with filth! Revel in profanity, and excel in abuse that distinguished Democrat, our illustrious leader in New York, Brick Pomeroy! Out-Pollard Pollard.

ABUSE THE PEOPLE!

Out with your wood-cuts, your roosters, your cannon! Magnify the national debt! Multiply your witticisms on Grant’s initials!

PURSUE THE ENEMY!

as you never did in war times. “Our grand old State moves slowly.” In very slow districts I have suggested a special contract with active men, thus: In 1865, the district polled 100 Democratic votes; 1866, 120 Democratic votes; now, for every Democratic vote over 110 polled, we will pay a fixed sum, the day after election.

LET US HAVE WAR!

By order:

W.A. VOXETRPR.ETERTANIHIL*
[Philadelphia Press.

The Grand Traverse Herald (Traverse City, Michigan) Oct 8, 1868

*I have no idea what that is supposed to say. That is what the spelling looked like on the digital newspaper image.

What it Was, But is Not

June 12, 2012

What it Was, But is Not.

From the Paris (Ill.) Beacon and Blade.

The old Democratic party, under whose banners we rallied in days gone by, and bore with pride our share of the conflict, rejoicing in its victories, and bewailing its defeats, was in truth a gallant organization, with blood and bone in its composition. It was a great party; one to be feared in a canvass, and entitled to the love of its friends and the respect of its foes. In power, the country was safe in its hands; out of power, its influence was still felt, and in spite of he great destructive element which for so many years controlled its administration of affairs, and finally culminated in a bloody war, we believed that it was in the main right, and best calculated to secure the greatest good to the greatest number.

We could have forgotten a thousand errors, save that of luke warm friendship to our country’s flag in times of peril, and tacit abetment of treason.

This high crime sunk the party, a disorganized mass, too low for resurrection; but out of the odds and ends there vegetated into action another organization that seized hold of the old name, and being drawn together by the cohesive power of plunder into something approximating unity of action, they set up in antagonism to Republicanism.

The distinctive differences between Democracy that was, and Democracy that is, may be summed up as follows:

Old Democracy advocated a specie basis.

New Democracy takes its success on greenbacks.

O.D. was patriotic.

N.D. abets traitors and despises loyal blue.

O.D. was expansive and progressive.

N.D. disfranchises students.

O.D. gave the ballot to the negro.

N.D. denies the ballot to crippled soldiers.

O.D. was decent and respectable.

N.D. reads and relishes Brick Pomeroy.

O.D. was feared and respected.

N.D. is laughed at and despised.

The rapid and startling changes daily going on in the principles of the new Democracy, will enable us to extend the above differences ad infinitum.

Alton Weekly Telegraph (Alton, Illinois) Jul 3, 1868

Image of Brick Pomeroy   from Wisconsin Historical Society

The following excerpt is from:
M.M. “Brick” Pomeroy: Forgotten Man of the Nineteenth Century
By Ruth Ann Tucker, 1979
Murphy Library Digitized Sources

 

M. M. “Brick” Pomeroy was a nineteenth-century American journalist whose active career spanned more than three decades, from the late 1850’s through the 1880’s. He was a highly controversial figure associated with many facets of American life, including Democratic politics, the Tweed Ring, the Greenback movement, Spiritualism, and western mining and tunnel building. Though a vile racist, he was a staunch supporter of workers and women and had a close affinity with farmers. He was acquainted with a number of noteworthy contemporaries, including Stephen Douglas, Henry Clay Dean, Benjamin Butler, Horace Greeley, William M. Tweed, and William F. Cody. He was a popular journalist, particularly in the rural Midwest and South, and for a time his La Crosse (Wis.) Democrat attained a larger circulation than any other newspaper in the country.

The Hillsdale Standard (Hillsdale, Michigan) Sep 1, 1868

Joseph E. Baker: Coloring the Editorial Pages of the Oakland Tribune

August 31, 2010

Roosevelt Bear Hunt (Image on Picassa by Eduard)

I ran across this humorous critique of Joseph E. Baker’s poem, “Teddy in the Lowlands, Low,” by a rival newspaper editor, while searching for articles about grasshoppers. Fortunately, I was also able to find the poem being referenced. After noticing Mr. Baker’s use of the “n” word, I did a little more searching to see what other colorful things he may have written while working for the Oakland Tribune.

Baker as Near-Poet

Our great and esteemed friend Joseph E. Baker of the Oakland Tribune, swayed undoubtedly by the applause that has greeted George Sterling and other residents of the Athens of the Pacific who have from time to time emulated Mr. Silas Wegg and have dropped into poetry, has fetched a swat at verse himself and in the Tribune of Tuesday we find him doing stunts with the English language, rhyme, rhythm and other things in an article denominated “Teddy, in the Lowlands, Low.”

At first blush we were inclined to exclaim: “Ah, that mine enemy should write a book.” But on second thoughts, it appears that it would be better to say: “Oh, that Joe Baker hadn’t done it.”

Joseph, you’re rhyming ear is all agley. For instance, “gale” doesn’t rhyme with “sails” even in the classic shades of Berkeley, nor can it be truly said that “fermenti” and “spermaceti” are allowable. Doubtless, those grave and reverend hymn-writers who made “grasshopper” and “caterpillar” rhyme in their poetic version of the Psalms were excusable, but Joseph, you never wrote those hymns, old in Sin as you are.

And again, why did you do it? Why cease in your earnest efforts to remove the brand from the prey of Rudolph Spreckels to wade through those dark lagoons, magnolia- scented.

“Where the crusty alligator
“Snoozes lazily in the sun,
“In the Louisiana lowlands, low,”

as you express it? Wouldn’t it have been better to sit lazily back in the Tribune editorial chair and gibe and jeer at the gentry across the bay?

You’ll regret it, too. There will be days when you will wish that you had been buried deep beneath the ooze of the Louisiana lowlands, four times as low as now you dream of, for WE SHALL PASTE THAT POEM IN OUR SCRAP-BOOK and draw on its contents from time to time.

Oh, what did you do it for?

Nevada State Journal (Reno, Nevada) Oct 10, 1907

This poem was published in the Oakland Tribune on October 8, 1907.

WHEN TEDDY ROOSEVELT WENT BEAR HUNTING IN LOUISIANA By Robert L. Moncrief, provides a detailed account of the bear hunt. Definitely worth reading.  ROOTSWEB LINK

To read more, check out the article,  The Great (Teddy) Bear Hunt .

The blog, East Carroll Parish, Louisiana Genealogy provides pictures and information about the other men on the bear hunt.

Back to Joseph E. Baker, the “poet”  and editorial writer.   He seems to have been  a real mover and shaker in the Oakland area. As a young man,  he served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. You can read more about him  HERE, in this Alameda County Biography.

Below is Mr. Baker’s editorial on the “Indian/Hindu” problem. It is in several pieces because it took up the whole upper half of a newspaper page!

Wow, “human locust,” “slaves of slaves,” “expect to be treated like dogs.”  Mr. Baker certainly had a way with words!

Upon Joseph E. Baker’s death, the Oakland Tribune ran several days worth of articles about him, quoting  the fond remembrances of friends and associates. The newspaper also stated he was an ardent DEMOCRAT.

Chickens Come Home to Roost

June 15, 2009

image from www.thecolumnists.com

Image from www.thecolumnists.com

I ran across this poem in the newspaper archives, while searching for something else:

CHICKENS COME HOME TO ROOST.

You may take the world as it comes and goes
And you will be sue to find
That fate will square the accounts she owes
Whoever comes out behind.
And all things bad that a man has done,
By whosoever induced,
Return at last to him one by one
As chickens come home to roost.

Sow as you will, there’s a time to reap
For the good and the bad as well;
And conscience, whether we wake or sleep
Is either a heaven or hell.
And every wrong will find its place
And every passion loosed;
Drifts back and meets you face to face
When the chickens come home to roost.

Whether your’re over or under the sod,
The result will be the same —
You cannot escape the hand of God,
You must bear your sin and shame.
No matter what’s carved on a marble slab
When the items are all produced,
You’ll find that God was “keeping tab,”
And that chickens come home to roost.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Nov 23, 1910

Thanks to our current President’s infamous preacher,  Rev. Wright, the old adage is enjoying a renewal in popularity, so I decided to do a search and see how it was used in the past. Here is just a small sample of what I found:

Chickens Come Home To Roost
Claim That Stolen Fowls Were Liberated When Auto Was Wrecked.

(Special to The News) MERCER, Pa., June 28.

“Chickens will come home to roost.” The truth of this old saw was proven here today in a criminal proceedings in which J.W. Cameron of Youngstown, O., was tried on a larceny charge. The testimony of the commonwealth witnesses proved that Cameron, who was transporting the chickens to Youngstown in an auto after committing an alleged theft at the home of P.S. Cozadd near Charleston on the Mercer-Sharon road, had an auto smashup at the McCullough bridge on this road and as a result of the wreck the chickens, which were in the tonneau of the car, were released. They went up the road to the Cozadd home which was only a short distance and went to roost at once. This point was argued by the commonwealth as being conclusive evidence that they were the property of Mr. Cozadd.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Jun 28, 1919

squiggle

HUMOR:

What is the meaning of the old saying: “Chickens come home to roost?” Well, it means all the night clubs are closed.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Feb 3, 1928

chickenroost

AND THE MORAL OF THE STORY IS:

A stranger came to me to ask about a local citizen. The stranger wished to buy a piece of property and was afraid of being cheated. He had to depend on the local man’s word. And he wished to know whether the man’s word is good. What could I say? I hated to spoil a neighbor’s trade — knock him out of profit. But I had to be square with the stranger too. So I said to him:

“Well, this fellow once owed me some money. Many many times he promised to pay it. But he never did.”

That was all the stranger wished to know. And it goes to show that chickens come home to roost.

You make a dollar by cheating one man and lose two dollars because your reputation is damaged.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Jul 16, 1929

POLITICS:

Negro Exclusion in Party Primary Illegal

Texans are interested in a decision by the United States circuit court of appeals at Asheville, North Carolina. Ruling of the court was that the democratic party of Virginia had no right to bar “negroes and other races” from its primary. Texas has a statute which bars negroes from the democratic party primary. It was enacted by democratic lawmakers and singed by a democratic governor.

If it is illegal in Virginia then it is illegal in Texas. It is said political chickens come home to roost. They do. Just the other day the state democratic executive committee adopted a rule barring democratic negroes from the party primary. Well, these democratic leaders should read the ruling of the United States circuit court of appeals….

It goes without saying that what is good (law) for the Virginia gander should be excellent fodder for the Texas goose….

Brownsville Herald (Brownsville, Texas) Jun 18, 1930

ACTIVISM – PACIFISM – FEMINISM:

Rosikaa Schwimmer

Rosika Schwimmer

MRS. SCHWIMMER’S DILEMMA.

Mrs. Rosika Schwimmer, as newspaper readers readily recall, is a noted pacifist. She first gained fame in connection with the Ford Peace Ship and a few years ago again broke into the news when she was denied citizenship in the United States because she refused to subscribe to that part of the oath of allegiance which states that the person taking the oath will take up arms and fight for the country if the need for such cooperation arises.

The matter was treated somewhat as a joke because of the sex of the protestant. We do not expect to require women to take up arms, but this was not the reason for Mrs. Schwimmer’s refusal to take the oath we require. She refused because for years she has taught and argued pacifism and because she did not think any man or woman should pledge themselves to fight for their country. Mrs. Schwimmer, be it understood, is not a communist or anything like that. She is an intelligent and moral woman, interested for years in pacifism.

Now comes this esteemed lady into the news of the day again. She has addressed the following appeal to fellow residents of America:

“Hilterism is destroying all the achievements of the women’s movement in Germany. Women are driven out of employment and the professions and kicked back into the realm of Kirche, Kinder, and Keuche — with the emphasis on Kinder. They are to be bearers of future soldiers, nothing else.

“What are America’s feminist doing against this outrage?

“The German pacifists are among the most vehemently persecuted and tortured victims of Hitlerism. Their houses are raided, their papers destroyed; they are imprisoned, tortured, kept in concentration camps and some of them face execution as indubitable information reveals.

“What are the American pacifists doing to save their unfortunate German colleagues?”

Whether we are pacifists, feminists or mere Americans of normal human sympathies we can agree that much of what she says appears to be right.

Hitler’s methods do arouse some justified indignation, but what can we do about it? Mrs. Schwimmer stands in the front line of those who have worked to keep us from having a navy of the first rank, from having an army or an air defense impressive enough to make our written protests weightily considered. How can we use effective force to compel Germany to do what Mrs. Schwimmer wants Germany to do, and at the same time destroy every factor which may lend force to our words and Mrs. Schwimmer and her kind have sought to destroy these factors.

There are times when chickens come home to roost and this is one of them. Mrs. Schwimmer would have us 100 per cent unarmed and defenseless and then when our hands are tied she would have us try to show some authority. Even if we wanted to do something our protests could not be carried far in the face of pacifistic opposition at home and nazi tenacity in Germany. Actually there is little reason for us to get heated up over what Hitler has been doing, but those who have opposed ultra-pacifism must get some pleasure from the Schwimmer dilemma.

Billings Gazette (Billings, Montana) Jul 16, 1933

AN EYE FOR AN EYE:

soviet chickensImage from http://www.russianartandbooks.com

Stalin Must Come Here To Collect Royalties
By PAUL FRIGGENS
NEA Staff Correspondent

A check was ready today for Joe Stalin, representing royalties on his new book he hasn’t heard about. Joe probably won’t like it but he must come to the United States to get his money.

The book is “Stalin’s Kampf,” edited by M.R. Werner and just published by Howell, Soskin and Company, New York. It was a collection of just about everything important the Russian dictator has ever written or said publicly. wherefore the publishers are willing to pay Stalin — the Soviet way.

They’ve so written the dictator. “We will pay you those royalties,” said the publishers in a letter to the Kremlin, “on exactly the same basis as the Union of Socialist Soviet Republics pays royalties to American authors; in other words, your royalties will be held here, and you are at liberty to come to the United States at any time and collect those royalties in dollars and spend those royalties in this country.”

So the Soviet chickens come home to roost. For years the Russians have been translating and publishing foreign books, often without so much as permission or notification of the authors or publishers.

If any author wanted his money he would have to go to Russia, where he would be paid in rubles which could not be taken out of the country.

Authors, moreover, could spend their money only in a few shops — the commision shops, run on a non-gold basis.

American authors in Russia are usually published in editions of 25,000 copies. Most popular are Upton Sinclair, Theodore Dreiser, Sinclair Lewis, Eugene O’Neill and Jack London.

Dreiser has collected “only a minute part of his royalties.” The same is true of Sinclair. O’Neill, has collected nothing. John DosPassos, Mary Heaton Vorse and E.E. Cummins went over to collect part of their royalties in rubles.

Joe Won’t Be Pleased

Now it’s a Russian’s turn to collect. Frankly, the publishers don’t expect Joe to like it. As a matter of fact they point out in their letter that payment is not legally required, as the content of the book is public property and therefore not protected by American copyright.

Joe won’t like some of the quotations either. For instance, this choice bit he is supposed to have dropped one summer night in 1923, opening his heart to Dzerzhinsky and Kameney:

“To choose one’s victim, to prepare one’s plans minutely, to slake an implacable vengeance, and then to go to bed . . . There is nothing sweeter in the world.”

Brownsville Herald (Brownsville, Texas) May 7, 1940

And finally, here is soviet “chicken” picture, just because. I have no idea what it says, but the chickens look like they are going home to roost.