Posts Tagged ‘Reading’

Bookish

November 2, 2012

Image from Wiki

BOOKISH BRIEFLETS.

Careless reading never made a well-read man.

Hasty writing spoils a book, but so does hasty reading.

Every book is a self-revelation which only sympathy can interpret.

It is never fair to judge an author’s work without intelligent and sympathetic attention.

Never imagine that there is a moral virtue in reading. A great reader may be a mighty scamp.

Thank God for libraries! but, after all, every man must come at last to his own private thinking.

Don’t imagine that you are big enough to find all that is hidden in a great book. Even the author finds more than he knew.

The reader can protect himself. If the author is a fool, he drops the book. But the author has no protection against the misinterpretations of foolish readers. — Congregationalist.

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Dec 29, 1899

Image from Ebay

National Read-A-Book Day

September 6, 2012

Image from Flavorwire

It’s National Read-A-Book Day

Click Orlando: 20(things to  know about) Books Everyone Should Read

*   *   *   *   *

Check out what folks were reading back in the day – New Books at the Library:

Lima News (Lima,Ohio) May 22, 1954

Council Bluffs Nonpareil (Council Bluffs, Iowa) Jul 25, 1953

Bismarck Tribune (Bismarck, North Dakota) Jan 17, 1944

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Mar 30, 1929

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Nov 30, 1921

Nebraska State Journal (Lincoln, Nebraska) Oct 20, 1909

North Adams Transcript (North Adams, Massachusetts) Jul 30, 1895

*   *   *   *   *

From the Dracut Library Blog:

WHY SHOULD YOU READ??

People learn to read by reading. Skill building is important, but without practice putting all the skills together, learning is slowed down. Quantity and intensity matter.

Frequent practice reading for longer periods of time pays off in fluency and ability to use skills automatically.

Increasing competence is motivating and increased motivation leads to more reading. When students can see their own progress, they want to read more.

Pleasure reading has cognitive benefits. It improves skill and strategy use, builds fluency, enlarges vocabulary, and builds a student’s knowledge of the world.

Children learn by example. Set aside 5 minutes of time where both you and your child read. Make it an important aspect of your day. As your child gets older, just doing the same activity can be a bonding experience – reinforcing the value of education. Whether it’s a magazine, newspaper, eReader or iPad, the important thing is Just do It!

Peace by a Rippling Stream

February 24, 2012

Image from It’s Always Tea Time

Peace. — By a Rippling Stream

I’ve read in stories all about
The cool inviting streams;
Where one leaves all her cares and woes,
And revels in sweet dreams.

I’ve reached one, after braving thorns
And briers in paths of dust,
The perspiration drips the while
I register disgust.

I’m battling huge mosquitoes, as
They bit my legs and arms.
Who said that one could find delight,
And peace, in nature’s charm?

I think the greatest joy that’s found,
Near clear enticing brooks,
Comes when we follow those which run
Through lovely story books.

— Lyla Myers, Little Rock, Ark.

The Oshkosh Northwestern (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) Jan 11, 1936

Charles Dickens: Over the Years

January 3, 2009
Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens

Boz.
The Sunday Morning News says the Reporters of N. York are taking measures to give Mr. Dickens (Boz) a slendid public entertainment, on his arrival in this country, which it is expected will be early in January next. – From present prospects, the dinner will be a magnificent affair.

Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine)  Nov 6, 1841

squiggle1

Arrival of the Britannia — Twenty eight days Later from England — Arrival of Charles Dickens — Twenty eight Thousand Russians killed or taken Prisoners by the Circassians, &c. &c.

As good luck would have it, just as our paper was going to press E. HARRIS, Esq. handed us a copy of the Evening Gazette, containing the news by the Britannia…

The Britania arrived at half past four o’clock on Saturday in 18 days from Liverpool. She experienced very heavy weather, having had her Paddle boxes much impaired and her Life Boasts stove? to pieces during a severe gale on the night of the 15th. In entering the harbor of Halifax she grounded but was got off again in a few minutes and anchored for the night. She brings an unusual large number of passengers, among whom is CHARLES DICKENS, the principal literary writer of the age.

Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) Jan 25, 1842

squiggle2

Charles Dickens, in behalf of the passengers of the Britannia during her last voyage on Saturday, last, presented Capt. Hewitt several pieces of plate as a testimony to the skill and gentlemanly conduct of that gentleman during the passage. The address was delivered at the Tremont? House, Boston, and was very neat.

Charles Dickens, Esq. alias “Boz,” as you will have heard before this reaches you, is now here. A complimentary dinner is to be given him next week. He is decidedly a good looking fellow wears long hair, and is of course the “lion of the city.” The Earl of Mulgrave is entirely eclipsed by him. It is stated that the tickets to the “Boz dinner,” are to be put at the moderate price of ten dollars, and I make no doubt the company will be sufficiently select.

Mr. Dickens is a pleasing writer, and I have no doubt is an amiable man, but, I question the propriety of feasting any man or set of men. There are a thousand as good men as Dickens in Boston, and probably double that number men who are in all respects his equals, if not his superiors. If they visit England, are they feasted, and worshipped? No. And here the people of that country shew their good sense. Let us receive distinguished strangers with cordiality and a hearty yankee greeting, and with all those little civilities which should characterise the meeting of friendly strangers, but at the same time eschew all that foolish and disgusting parade, which is but too common at the present day. Besides, I am so much of a republican, that I would no sooner honor a lord, a duke, a prince, or a literary man, than I would a mechanic who had become famous in his calling. A skilful engineer, or cordwainer, if he is a gentleman, is as deserving of homage, (and frequently more so,) as is a representative of the aristocracy, or of the literature of a country. However, as I shall not attend the ten dollar fete, I will say nothing more.

Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) Feb 1, 1842

squiggle3Groupies, circa 1842

Several Plymouth girls made a request of Dickens for a lock of his hair. In a letter to them says the Rock, he declines a compliance with that request, because it would afford a precedent, which, if followed, would shortly result in total baldness. Boz concluded his letter in very pretty terms, and his reply was a very proper one.

Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) Feb 15, 1842

squiggle4

Charles Dickens.
At a late dinner given to Mr. Dickens at Hartford about 80 gentlemen, and among the, Gov. Ellsworth, Bishop Brownell, Mr. Niles and other distinguished men sat down to the table. After several toast had been given, the president of the day introduced, with some appropriate complimentary remarks, the following toast.

The health of Charles Dickens Elected by the world’s suffrage, to an elevated station in the great republic of letters, his fame is written on the heart, and the head approves the record.

This toast was received with enthusiastic and long continued applause. Mr. Dickens, when the applause had subsided, rose and in feeling and unaffected terms thanked the company for the kind feelings which they had expressed towards him…

Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) Feb 19, 1842

You can read his speech here:

SPEECH: FEBRUARY 7, 1842.

squiggle5

N.B. — Mr. BONNER has the pleasure of announcing that CHARLES DICKENS, who is universally conseded to be the most popular author living, has been engaged to write a Tale expressly for the columns of the LEDGER; and that he is now at work upon it. Advance sheets of Mr. DICKENS’ stories have at different time been obtained by American publishers, but this is the first time that a tale has been written expressly and solely for an American periodical by such an eminent author as Mr. DICKENS; and yet Mr. BONNER would not have the public suppose that he thinks there is anything very remarkable about this engagement — it is only part and parcel of his policy.

The New York Times (New York, New York) Arp 25, 1859

Congratulations

Congratulations

A translation of Charles Dickens’ Tale of Two Cities is to appear in the feuilleton, Le Pays, the semi-official journal of the French Government.

The New York Times (New York, New York) May 26, 1860

squiggle6Literary Humor:

A facetious correspondent sends us a query — Which is the most industrious writer, Dickens, Bulwer Lytton, or Mr. Warren? to which he answers Dickens; for he writes All the Year Round, while Bulwer has written Night and Morning, and Warren Now and Then. In justice to the latter gentleman our friend should have remembered that when he was merely writing novels, Mr. Warren wrote Ten Thousand a Year.

The New York Times (New York, New York) June 30, 1860

This Dickens fan was a bit extreme:

A boy of fifteen lately committed suicide in London because the servant maid took away his candle while he was reading “Pickwick Papers.” Mr. Dickens should immortalize him in his next novel.

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) Sep 30, 1865

cdickens

CHARLES DICKENS FOR PARLIAMENT.
Charles Dickens is being again importuned to become a candidate for Parliament. Says an English contemporary: “Mr. C. Dickens should be heard by every one who wishes to hear oratory. In vain will he listen in the House of Commons for the like. Gladstone and D’Israeli have not a tithe of the command of the brilliant spirit, flowing, uninterrupted words, beautiful and truthful thoughts, of our great English novelist. He has been asked over and over again to stand for some place or another. He knows any part of London would return him, free o’ cost, and give him a statue in precious metal at the same time to commemorate the event. But he will not. It is his pride, perhaps, to wash his hands of any institution he has so freely rediculed; but there is good still in it, and he might honor the House and the country by taking his seat there.”

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) May 17, 1866

dickens-reading-to-daughters

Dickens Reading

Dickens Reading

HOW CHARLES DICKENS READS.
Mr. Dickens’ method is thus described in the Philadelphia Ledger:
He takes one of his works, “David Copperfield,” for example, and in about an hour and a half tells the whole story of the book, occasionally selecting a favorite passage, which he repeats in full, making all the characters act and talk precisely as he fancied them at the time of their creation in his own mind. All this is done with the finest dramatic effect, as Mr. Dickens, among his other intellectual qualities, has those of a finished actor of the highest grade. He has, too, the great advantage of knowing all about the characters he personates in his readings. To use one of his own expressions, he “knows their tricks and their manners.” It is on account of these elements that the “Dickens readings” are said to excel all other entertainments of the same general character.

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) Sep 22, 1867

squiggle7

BOSTON, Nov. 18. — The sale of tickets to Dickens’ course of readings, which took place at Ticknor & Fields’ to-day, cause no little sensation. At sunrise the crowd begain to gather, and the aid of a strong police force was required to enforce fair play among the eager applicants. Nearly all the tickets for the course, about 8,000, were sold, and hundreds were disappointed in securing any. A few tickets got into the hands of speculators, who offer them at $20 each.

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) Nov 30, 1867

squiggle8

The Philadelphia correspondent of the London Times says that Mr. Dickens will have to pay $20,000 of his receipts for reading, in this country, as an internal revenue tax.

St Joseph Herald (Saint Joseph, Michigan) Mar 14, 1868

Dickens

Dickens

Mark Twain is lecturing to crowded houses in California and Nevada.
Dickens is writing a $10,000 Chirstmas play for Jarrett, of Niblo’s, New York.
For $60,000 in gold, Strauss has consented to make a concert tour in this country.

Mrs. Ann S. Stephens has written a new fiction which is “Doubly False.”

Anna Dickinson is going to England to lecture.

St Joseph Herald (Saint Joseph, Michigan) June 6, 1868

$$$$$$$$$

The London Court Journal says that Charles Dickens made more than $260,000 in America, and has just concluded an engagement for 100 farewell readings in England, for which he is to receive L8,000 without risk.

St Joseph Herald (Saint Joseph, Michigan) Sep 26, 1868

Tom Thumb

Tom Thumb

Personal and Literary.
Charles Dickens’ only surviving brother died, a few weeks ago, in England.
Emerson is getting deaf.
Tom Thumb is growing taller.

St Joseph Herald (Saint Joseph, Michigan) Nov 28, 1868

$$$$$$$$$

Dickens is coining money by his farewell readings inthe large cities of England, and only one-quarter of the applicants for tickets are successful. After reading in Scotland and Ireland he goes to Paris, where his audiences have heretofore been large and enthusiastic.

St Joseph Herald (Saint Joseph, Michigan) Jan 23, 1869

Humorous letter to the press, asking for a correction, after they incorrectly reported his sister-in-law had DIED!

The following is the text of Charles Dickens note to the London News, a summary of which was received by the cable: “Sir– I am required to discharge a painful act of duty imposed upon me by your insertion in your paper of Saturday of a paragraph from the New York Times respecting the death, at Chicago, of  ‘Mrs. Augustus N. Dickens, widow of the brother of Charles Dickens, the celebrated English novelist.’ The widow of my late brother, in that paragraph referred to, was never at Chicago; she is a lady now living, and resident in London; she is a frequent guest at my house, and I am one of the trustees under her marriage settlement. My temporary absence in Ireland has delayed for some days my troubling you with the request that you will have the goodness to publish this correction. I am, &c., CHARLES DICKENS. “Belfast, Jan. 14.”

St Joseph Herald (Saint Joseph, Michigan) Feb 20, 1869

Declining Health?

Charles Dickens suffers from palsy in the right hand, induced by writing too much.

St Joseph Herald (Saint Joseph, Michigan) Mar 6, 1869

AND

Dickens has suspended his readings under medical advice.

St Joseph Herald (Saint Joseph, Michigan) Mar 20, 1869

squiggle9

Charles Dickens was banquetted in Liverpool on the 11th. About 700 persons sat with him at the table. In responding to a sentiment, Anthony Trollope intimated that the appointment of Mr. Dickens as Minister to Washington would be beneficial to both countries.

St Joseph Herald (Saint Joseph, Michigan) Apr 24, 1869

Dickens Writing

Dickens Writing

Mr. Dickens is again reported to be writing a novel.
It is reported that Anna Dickinson is worth $100,000.

St Joseph Herald (Saint Joseph, Michigan) June 5, 1869

p_19_sm

In a recent speech at Birmingham, Charles Dickens alluded to the fact that a former speech of his had been misunderstood, and he would therefore take this occasion to restate his political creed. He had no faith in the people with a small “p” governing, but entire faith in the People with a large “P” governed. He put entire trust in the masses, none whatever in the so-called ruling class.

St Joseph Herald (Saint Joseph, Michigan) Jan 15, 1870

squiggle10

EVERY SATURDAY, No. 15, for April 9, contains the first installment of Mr. Dickens’ new story, “The Mystery of Edwin Drood.” This 1st published from advance sheets, by special arrangement with Mr. Dickens, and appears simultaniously with its publication in England. It is accompanied by the illustrations drawn for the English edition by Mr. Fildes, under the supervision of Mr. Dickens himself. Those who desire to read this great story in its earliest and only authorized form in America, can find it in Every Saturday. This number of Every Saturday is rendered additionally attractive by an excellent new portrait of Mr. Dickens, and views of his residence at Gad’s Hill Place. A supplement is issued with the number, entitled “Mr. Pickwick’s Reception,” drawn expressly for this number by Mr. S. Eytinge, Jr. It represents the numerous personages of Mr. Dickens’ novels passing before Mr. Pickwick, to whom they are pointed out by the trusty Sam Weller. The admirers of Mr. Dickens will easily recognize their favorites and aversions, — Mr. Pecksniff and his daughters, jolly Mark Tapley, Mr. Micawber and the twins, Fagin, the Artful Dodger, the Fat Boy trying to grow fatter, Little Nell and her Grandfather, Dombey, Bob Cratchit with Tiny Tim, and indeed almost the entire roll of characters that throng Mr. Dickens’ unequalled stories.
FIELDS, OSGOOD & Co., Publishers, Boston.

St Joseph Herald (Saint Joseph, Michigan) Apr 9, 1870

Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens

It is said that the advertisements which will be printed at the end and beginning of each part of Mr. Dicken’s new novel will not only pay the cost of the novel’s “composition,” but leave a very handsome overplus. The only cost, therefore, to the author will be the paper and press-work. Mr. Dickens is his own publisher, and allows the trade publishers a commission on sales made, in this way reversing the usual relations between authors and publishers.

St Joseph Herald (Saint Joseph, Michigan) May 14, 1870

Read Like the DICKENS!

January 2, 2009
Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens

I can see using this in the classroom as a tool to work on oral reading. Maybe paired with some Dickens Readers’  Theatre?

DICKENS AS A READER.
–Of Mr. Dickens as an author we need not speak. His position is settled, for high or low, for good, bad or indfferent in the minds of all reading men and women. The people who idolize Dickens the author cannot be shaken from their hero-worship; and those who don’t like him cannot be made to see what it is that other folks find so wonderful in his writings. But of Mr. Dickens as a reader, as a histrionic artist, we do not think there can be two opinions. Here his power is supreme, and beyond cavil. Here he shows a side of the shield which everbody can see to be gold, unalloyed. Even those who do not enjoy Dickens as they read him, cannot fail to revel in him as read by himself. Why is this? What is the secret of this man, commanding as he does, at will, the tears and laughter of large audiences, or keeping them hushed and spell bound — the latter condition of his hearers being no less a proof of his skill than the eliciting of their active emotions? To put the answer into one word, we should say — Art — his elaborate, consummate Art. Dickens the author is a genius beyond doubt; but Dickens the reader is a most finished artist. There is no need of supposing that the divine faculty to the one species of work extends into the other; for there was Shakespeare, the greatest of all geniuses, who was a very common sort of an actor in his own plays, if we may credit tradition. Plenty of genius has existed, notably that of our own Irving, which never attained unto the mystery of thinking on one’s legs, or standing up in public, in a less graceful attitude than that of the town pump.

We say that Mr. Dickens is a great artist. In the preface to one of his books, he has acknowledged his indebtedness to hard work, and even his freshest literary achievements bear the marks of patient toil. He is known to have carried into his readings the same method of study, care and precision, and to have regarded the whole business in its minutest details, as a matter of deliberate design. He neglects nothing that can contribute to effect. Take the version of his writings which he reads. They differ from the published form in being trimmed, compressed, all the by-play and padding left out, and all the points and hits retained. We were particularly impressed with this in the neat reduction of the Christmas Carol to the smallest compass consistent with telling the story clearly; and also with the self-denying resolution manifested in omitting many of the ludicrous incidents, description and dialogue, in the Pickwick Trial. Mr. Dickens takes great care not to bore his audiences, but bows his retirement to them, while they still have a good appetite for more; an excellent rule for feasts of reason and flows of soul, as well as for more palpable banquets.

Look, too, at the mis en scene. A purple screen behind him (a pleasant color to look at, though it imparts an unpleasant complimentary green to other objects, ladies’ faces included) against which his figure stands in bold relief; powerful gas lights at each side shedding their glare upon him alone; a mere skeleton of a lectern which does not conceal the form of the speaker; even the inevitable English bottle of water (English water?) and tumbler standing upon the side of the desk, from the which he rewards himself with a sip after each stave of his carol, as Addison was reported to have done with a stronger beverage, at the termination of an uncommonly fine paragraph — and there are a great many such stopping places — in the Spectator. This is all Art, and so are the little bouquet in the left buttonhole of his coat, second from top, and the other details of his dress, into which Sartorian particulars we do not propose to enter. So much for what many persons would consider only trifles.

But when Dickens begins to read we see that all this preparation is a type of what follows, that it is the perfect prelude of a perfect work. For here, at every step we discern the most patient study, the most conscientious care. His voice, though not very strong (and a trifle husky the first night,) quite fills the large house. His accent is of a well-bred Englishman, but his pronunciation is clearer, more distinct and every way more agreeable to American ears than that of most of his countrymen, even the cultivated ones. It is very flexible, and managed with great skill, so as to give the growl of old Scrooge, the baby chirp of Tiny Tim, the bluster of Sergeant Buzzfuz and teh inanity of Mr. Justice Stareleigh to perfection. From one character to another, among the dozen or so which figure in the Carol, he passes with perfect ease, never for a moment confounding the tones which are a part of their individuality. No less appropriate are the gestures and the changing facial expressions — all finished studies, delicate touches like those of a cameo cutter. When he describes the mashing of the potatoes for the Cratchit feast, he mashes invisible Murphies with his hand. He sniffs audibly to express sage and onions, and the audience can almost smell that corollary of the Christmas goose. The crackle of chestnuts on the fire, he somehow brings home to us by a nervous lighning-like motion of his hands. When he wishes to bring before our mind that contradance, of which old Feezwig was the bright particular star, he mimics the woven paces all about his reading desk. This gesticulation and facial change is humor or pathos at pleasure. In Bob Cratchit’s lament over poor Tiny Tim, it touches the fountain of tears, in reader and listener alike; and in old Weller’s observations from the gallery, it puts hearers into convulsions of laughter, from which Dickens himself can hardly refrain.
And so on. we might quote a hundred instances, if we cared to, from his readings, to illustrate the thorough, pains-taking art of Dickens, the reader, with which its genius as an author has nothing to do. If his coming here shall elevate the standard of public readings and recitations, it will have had one very beneficial effect.

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) 22 Dec 1867