Posts Tagged ‘Sports’

You Gonna Vote?

November 4, 2012

Football

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Baseball

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Civic Duty

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Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Oct 2, 1956

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Iowa City Press Citizen (Iowa City, Iowa) Nov 1, 1926

It’s All About the Ball

May 9, 2012

Image from Glimpses Into Baseball History

Base Ball.

As many of our readers are not familiar with the game, we append a description of it, written by our friend Cory O’Lanus, a warm admirer of the game:

“The game is a great invention. It is easily understood. All you have to do is just keep your eye on the ball.

It is all about a ball.

Image from Rob L’s Baseball Memorabilia

They also use a bat. The bat is a club built on the model of the club Barnum killed Capt. Cook with.

This is the reason why the organization is called a club.

One fellow takes a club and stands on a line, and another stands in front and fires the ball at him.

The chap with a club hits back.

The ball flies in another direction.

The first fellow drops the club as though he was scared, and runs like a pickpocket with an M.P. after him.

Several fellows run after the ball; somebody catches it and fires it at somebody else, when the chap who had the club stops running.

Another fellow then takes the club and the same man, who is called “pitcher,” pitches on him, fires the ball at him, when he hits back, knocks the ball, drops his club and cuts his stick for the first base.

Image from Civil War, Washington, D.C.

Half a dozen fellows out on picket duty scramble for the ball.

One reliable B.B. is posted behind the club man, in case the club man missed the ball, to see that it don’t go by and hit the Umpire.

When one side goes out the other side goes in, and when both sides are out it is called innings.

It is quite an intelligent game, depending entirely on the use of your legs. The first principle of the game is running.

When you are “in” you run away from the ball; when you are “out” you run after it.

It is splendid exercise; it keeps you so warm; consequently always played in the summer time.”

The Hillsdale Standard (Hillsdale, Michigan) May 15, 1866

Should Auld Acquaintance be Forgot … 1956

December 31, 2011

Famed Sports Celebrities Passed Away During 1956

By OSCAR FRALEY
(United Press Sports Writer)
NEW YORK, Dec. 31 — (UP)

There will be quite a few tears in the cup of happiness tonight.

For when they ring in the new year, too many sporting favorites won’t be on hand. They just didn’t make it all the way with the infant 1956 they helped welcome only a year ago.

But they’ll be in many a mind when the voices rise in the old refrain “should auld acquaintance be forgot?”

Babe Didrikson

Like the Babe. They all knew her and the world mourned when its greatest woman athlete, Mrs. Mildred Didrikson Zaharias, died in September at the age of 42. President Eisenhower summed it up when he said:

“I think that every one of us feels sad that finally she had to lose this last one of all her battles.”

Connie Mack

Gone, too, is the tall, spare man who was a baseball legend. Connie Mack, the seemingly indestructible, struck out at 93. But, then, life hadn’t been the same for him since the heart-breaking morning 15 months earlier when his beloved A’s were sold down the river to Kansas City.

“Should auld acquaintance be forgot?”

Who can forget the “Boston Tar Baby”? He fought the best of them and won the championship of Mexico when he was almost blind. But at 75, Sam Langford finally took the count in a Massachusetts nursing home.

And Bill Cane, the man whose vision “made” the Hambletonian and helped make harness racing a big business. Big Bill, at 81, finally laid down the reins at Miami, Florida, far from the Good Time track at Goshen, N.Y., which he loved so dearly.

Red Strador

It came early for Norman (Red) Strador. The bluff red-head who coached football for St. Mary’s, the San Francisco 49’ers and the erstwhile New York Yankees, was cut down by a heart attack at 53.

“Should auld acquaintance be forgot?”

Racing fans will remember three who took the checkered flag.

You see again, white-toothed Bob Sweikert sitting happily in victory lane at Indianapolis in 1955 and asking his wife jokingly:

“You were worried about me?” He got it against the wall at Salem, Ind. Age 30.

Then there were bushy-browed Jack McGrath, dead in a Phoenix, Ariz., crash at 35.

And little Walt Faulkner, who flipped five times and out at Vallejo, Calif., a passion for speed burning him out at 37.

“Should auld acquaintance be forgot” when you think of the others who bowed out? Like horseman Clifford Mooers, a fabulous personality; Burly Donna Fox, the bobsledder whose passion was golf, and genial, gentle Rud Rennie, a long-time pal from the New York Herald-Tribune.

It can’t be — for the sake of auld lang syne.

The Bridgeport Post (Bridgeport, Connecticut) Dec 31, 1956

Smokin’ Joe – The Crusade is Over

November 8, 2011

Frazier’s The Greatest; He’s The King

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Once Pretty Face Of Ali Messed Up

Cumberland Evening Times (Cumberland, Maryland) Mar 9, 1971

Frazier ‘Whups’ Cassius On Decision After Brutal Bout

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‘Who’s Champ”‘ Asks Happy Joe

Daily Chronicle (Centralia, Washington) Mar 9, 1971

Ali’s Tongue Silenced For Once, Promoters Dreaming Of Rematch

Courier News (Blytheville, Arkansas) Mar 9, 1971

No More Jawboning

Joe Frazier Decks Ali In 15th Round

Daily Inter Lake (Kalispell, Montana) Mar 9, 1971

Victory, vindication belong to Frazier

But what the undisputed champ wants most is a fitting tribute from the great Ali

Bennington Banner (Bennington, Vermont) Mar 9, 1971

Undisputed Heavyweight King Frazier Urged to Retire

*****

Smokin’ Joe Awaits Clay’s Apology

Brownsville Herald (Brownsville, Texas) Mar 9, 1971

‘Fight-of-Century’ billing lives up to expectations

*****

Frazier throttles Ali;

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THE CRUSADE IS OVER

Albuquerque Tribune (Albuquerque, New Mexico) Mar 9, 1971

1944 – 2011