Posts Tagged ‘Spousal Abuse’

Cross Words and Crosswords

January 5, 2012

Cross and Puzzled

A Cross Word puzzle is a cinch for some,
But not very easy for a fellow who’s dumb.
They give you a word and you hunt for its mate,
You work on it from early morn until late,
You think you have found just the word that you need,
You tax your brain till you’re way off your feed,
The dictionary you look into, page after page,
When you can’t find the word, you fly off in a rage
And when the time comes to creep into your bed,
You can’t get to sleep; words run through your head.
“O, when will this craze be over”, you cry
The answer comes back: “In the sweet bye and bye”.
It’s good for the intellect of some that we know
But as for poor me, there’s not a ghost of a show.
D.L.C.

Daily Messenger (Canadaigua, New York) Jan 26, 1925


Crossword Religion

Opinion will be divided upon the unique plan of Rev. George W. McElveen of stimulating interest in the church through the agency of the crossword puzzle. Rev. McElveen, who is pastor of the Knoxville Baptist Church, of Pittsburgh, Pa., recently announced that the congregation would have to solve a crossword puzzle before he would preach his sermon. The puzzle spaces were mapped out on a huge blackboard and suspended by the pulpit and the congregation had to guess the correct words for them. when completed the words formed the text of the sermon.

The idea of the crossword puzzle is old but this particular application of it is new indeed and was undertaken by Rev. Mc Elveen, it is understood in an effort to give his church a little more life and activity and add an additional interest to a perhaps dry theological dissertation. As is usual with an entirely new idea there is much discussion both for and against, some persons holding that the reverend gentleman’s plan is a forward step in modernizing religion and making it palatable for the younger generation. the opposite side, however, consists mostly of older, and perhaps more orthodox church goers, deplores this tendency to introduce any innovations in the church services. It is doubtful, however, if many other ministers try the scheme until they find out how the plan worked in Rev. McElveen’s church.

Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) Dec 3, 1924

Echoes of many family jars in this community lately have reached our ears. Knowing, of course, that wifie is not always “dovey” in hunting season time, we attributed the many domestic squabbles to that cause. Now, according to the following, it isn’t hunting season, or bobbed hair, that’s causing all the trouble, but — well, read it for yourself:

Lancaster, Pa., Dec. 3 — Edith M. Fry of Ephrata, told a jury in court today that her husband, Alvin B. Fry, beat her because she was unable to figure how much “gas” it required to drive the family automobile from their home to Washington. The jury granted her a divorce. But the husband says he hit his wife only after she had put across an uppercut that closed one eye. He contested the divorce. Apparently the husband was a crossword puzzle fan, for, according to testimony, he frequently heaved the dictionary at his wife when she failed to give prompt definitions to words he propounded.

Clearfield Progress (Clearfield, Pennsylvania) Dec 5, 1924

Crossword puzzle in Latin will be introduce on examination at Milton Academy this year for Latin students.

Daily Messenger (Canadaigua, New York) Dec 19, 1924

“My Wife Didn’t Want a Divorce…”

November 9, 2011

Image from Tokyo Rose WW2

Solved Divorce Problem by Taking Wife Across Knee and Spanking Her

N.Y. Sun-Syracuse Herald — Special.

Evansville, Ind., March 1 — “I don’t kneed a lawyer to fight a divorce case,” said Frank Kuebler when told his wife had sued him.

Kuebler is a wealthy farmer and an educated man. His wife charged him with cruel treatment. As soon as he was informed of the suit he drove home and there faced his wife. He took her across his lap and spanked her with a slipper, according to her statements to the neighbors.

Kuebler and his wife came to her lawyer’s office here and she directed the attorney to immediately dismiss the suit for divorce.

“My wife didn’t want a divorce and I soon showed her she didn’t,” said Kuebler.

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Mar 5, 1911

Texas Lynching – Abuse of 14 year-old Wife

December 28, 2010

Image by K-Weston on Flickr

TEXAS LYNCHING.

James Howard Taken From Jail and Hanged at Midnight.


TEXARKANA, Tex., Dec. 18. — James Howard, aged 35 years, was taken from jail here at midnight of the 15th, by a masked mob, by whom he was carried a short distance below town and hanged to a railroad trestle. Howard was arrested Wednesday on a warrant sworn out by his mother-in-law, Mrs. Winchew, charging him with maltreating his wife, who si scarcely 14 years old. Howard and his wife were married last July. Mrs. Howard tells the story of the atrocious brutality on the part of her husband. She says he frequently tied her feet together, while she was in a state of nudity, and hanging her up by the feet, beat her unmercifully and threatened to kill her if she told any one of his cruelties.

On the first day of November Howard took a common branding iron, used to brand live stock and heating it red hot branded a large letter “H” on his wife’s person in two places while she was tied to the bed. After suffering several weeks from the effects of these burns, Mrs. Howard  told her mother what had happened with the result that Howard was arrested.

Deputy Sheriff Hargett anticipated that a mob would attack the jail at night, and had employed extra guards, but the mob gained entrance while the guards were eating their midnight meal.

Milford Mail (Milford, Iowa) Dec 23, 1886

A Drunkard Gets Bellowed

July 21, 2010

New Cure for Drunkenness.

Police of Paris are investigating a curious case. The wife of an engineer, whose husband was in the habit of beating her when he was drunk, reached the limit of patience the other day and determined to inflict a lesson on him.

When he arrived home about two o’clock in the morning in the usual condition she conducted him into the workshop, flung him face downward, fastened him securely, and, taking the bellows from the forge, proceeded to blow him up.

The pain he suffered brought him to his senses and his cries summoned the neighbors, who released him, seriously ill with peritonitis. His wife was arrested.

Daily Iowa State Press (Iowa City, Iowa) Nov 1, 1901

Brutal Blute Kicks His Wife to Death

June 7, 2010

Portsmouth, N.H. (Image from http://en.wikipedia.org)

KICKED TO DEATH.

The Brutal Act of a Brewer in New Hampshire.

PORTSMOUTH, N.H., Dec. 27 — The police were notified that a murder had been committed in this city yesterday in a residence. When the officers entered the kitchen on the floor a most horrible sight met their eyes. Lying dead on the floor was Margaret Blute, the wife of John Blute. The body was perfectly naked. The head, throat and body were terribly bruised and discolored, and from all appearances the woman had been kicked and beaten to death. The woman’s husband was sitting unconcernedly beside the body, fully dressed, and his four little children were in the corner crying.

The man looked up at the officers and saying: “This is a bad piece of business,” struck a match and lighted his pipe.

When he went to leave the room a few minutes later he was arrested.

He said that after he had beaten and kicked his wife in their bedroom he had thrown her down into the cellar and then went to sleep. When he woke up, about midnight, he found her dead on the floor, and had called in some neighbors. He thought it was about 5:30 p.m. when he had beaten his wife, but wasn’t sure.

He said he was 45 years of age, and had been married seven years. His wife was 33.

The authorities took charge of the house, and neighbors cared for the children. The prisoner will be arraigned on the charge of murder in the first degree. He was employed in a brewery, and is said to be of a peaceful disposition.

Trenton Times, The (Trenton, New Jersey) Dec 27, 1886

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Brutality of Blute the Wife Murderer

PLYMOUTH, Dec. 28 — New and important facts in relation to the Blute murder were elicited at the coroner’s inquest today. Persons who saw a part of the tragedy tell a terrible story and say that Blute, while murdering the woman, told her that he meant to kill her. The coroner’s jury will return a verdict of murder in the first degree tomorrow.

Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) Dec 29, 1886

Patrick Blute, the Brute.

PORTSMOUTH, N.H., Dec. 8 — The coroner’s jury rendered a verdict that Mrs. Blute was murdered by her husband, Patrick.

Saturday Herald (Decatur, Illinois) Jan 1, 1887

NEW HAMPSHIRE.

Matters in the Legislature

CONCORD, Jan. 21. The Governor and Council this forenoon gave a hearing upon the petition for the pardon of Patrick Blute, who was sentenced to 20 years imprisonment in April, 1877, (typo) for manslaughter in killing his wife in Portsmouth on Christmas day, 1886. The ground upon which the application is based is that Blute is incurably ill of consumption. Hon. Calvin Page, of Portsmouth, appeared for the petitioners and Attorney General Bainard and County Solicitor Emery in opposition.

Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) Jan 22, 1891

Patrick Blute, the Portsmouth wife murderer, died in prison at Concord, N.H.

The Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jan 31, 1891

Title: Reports, Volume 1
Author: New Hampshire
Published: 1892
(Google book, pg 175 – LINK)

One of Patrick Blute’s daughters:

The marriage of Artis F. Schurman and Miss Margaret E. Blute, two well known young people, is announced to take place on Wednesday, Feb. 8.

Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) Jan 31, 1899

Mrs. Margaret E. Bray

Mrs. Margaret E. Bray of 589 Dennett street, wife of Mark W. Bray, died early this morning after a long illness. She was born in Portsmouth, the daughter of the late John and Margaret (Quinn) Blute.

Mrs. Bray is survived by her husband, one son, Charles A. Schurman of Warwick, R.I.; two daughters, Mrs. Helen M. Cooper and Hazel F. Schurman, both of Philadelphia, Pa., and two sisters, Mrs. Mary O’Gilvie and Mrs. Julia Remick, both of Portsmouth.

Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) Dec 12, 1944

Patrick Blute’s father:

John Blute.

John Blute, one of the oldest Irish residents in the city, died at the home of his granddaughter on Dennett street, on Wednesday evening, the 20th inst., aged eighty-six years. He had been a citizen of Portsmouth for over fifty years.

Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) Nov 21, 1901

Wills proved. — John Blute. Portsmouth, Margaret E. Schurman, executrix;…

Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) Jan 3, 1902

Image from cardcow.com

Another daughter:

Wedding of Miss Blute And Mr. Remick

CEREMONY PERFORMED BY REV. FR. CAVANAUGH

A pretty wedding of two popular young people took place at six o’clock on Thursday evening at the rectory of the Church of the Immaculate Conception, when Miss Julia G. Blute of this city and Austin Remick of Rye were married.

The ceremony was performed by Rev. Fr. William J. Cavanaugh.

The bride was tastefully gowned in a dress of Alice blue with a pink hat. She was attended by her sister, Miss Mary Blute, who wore a handsome dress of pale lavender.

Walter Varrell of Dover, a life-long friend of the groom, acted as best man.

After the ceremony, Mr. and Mrs. Remick repaired to the home of the bride, 10 Langdon street, where the immediate friends and relatives enjoyed a collation and a reception was held.

Mr. and Mrs. Remick received many costly and useful gifts and the congratulations of a legion of acquaintances, who wish them much joy in their new life.

The bride has for the past six years been an employe of the Morley Button Company and a young lady held in high esteem by her shopmates. The groom is one of the best known young men of his native town and has many warm friends at home and in this city.

Mr. and Mrs. Remick will resdie at 10 Langdon street.

Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) May 25, 1906

Mrs. Julia G. Remick

RYE — Mrs. Julia Genevieve Remmick, 69, of Brackett Road, widow of Austin F. Remick, died this morning.

Born in Portsmouth Jan. 31, 1883, the daughter of the late Patrick and Margaret (Quinn) Blute, she had resided in Rey for the past 47 years.

Survivors include four sons, Sgt. Stanton G. Remick of the Portsmouth police department, Melvin S., Artis F. and Sherman A. Remick, all of Rey; two daughters, Mrs. Lawrence Harmon of Machias, Me., and Mrs. Lawrence Seavey of Rye; one sister, Mrs. Mary Ogilvie of Portsmouth; 15 grandchildren; three great-grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.

Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) Jan 12, 1953

Blute family - 1880 Census

*****

The elder John Blute and granddaughters - 1900 Census