Posts Tagged ‘Washington D.C.’

The Grand Review in ’65 and ’92

November 10, 2010

G.A.R. AT WASHINGTON,

Largest Demonstration ever made by the Organization.

Grand Army week at Washington opened fair and the weather generally was pleasant during the national Encampment. All day and night of Monday the streets were alive with marching men, G.A.R. posts and their friends, on their way from railroad stations to quarters. Despite all the exertions that the railroad companies made to handle the crowds promptly, the visitors were from two to twelve hours late in reaching the city; but as rapidly as possible the trains were rolling into the city and unloading their human freight. The passengers accepted the situation with the best possible grace, and whatever the measure of their discontent it was all dissipated upon arriving at the Capitol, as they looked upon the generous and artistic manifestations of welcome and found themselves surrounded with reminiscences of the war and in the society of those whose friendship was knit in the blood and smoke of battle.

Tuesday was the great day of the reunion, with its grand parade, intended to be in commemoration of the grand review of 1865. Fifty thousand Union survivors of the great struggle marched over the identical route taken on that memorable occasion. Thirty thousand other wearers of the Grand Army badge or button, withholding themselves from the procession for various reasons, stood along the curbs or sat upon the stands, cheering their comrades as division by division, platoon by platoon, passed by for nearly seven unbroken hours. Along the two-mile route fully 350,000 persons were gathered to watch the procession. The parade was, with few exceptions, composed of men who were young 30 years ago, but who are now advanced in years. They wore the blue uniforms of the Grand Army, which is neat, but not gaudy, and they marched as old men march. With many it was an effort to cover that long stretch of road-way after waiting several hours to fall into line. Many were suffering from wounds which had never healed; many were broken and bent with rheumatism and other diseased incident to camp life. But what they lacked in grace and movement they made up in spirit and determination, and at every step they were cheered with heartiness which they would have been less than human not to appreciate.

The posts marched in two parallel columns, each of 12 files front, to Fifthteenth street and then the columns united and formed one sold column of 24 files front. At the Treasury Department Vice President Morton reviewed the procession and at the War Department the veterans marched in review before their commander-in-chief, Gen. Palmer.

Illinois had the place of honor in the parade, the State being the parent of the Grand Army of the Republic. Wisconsin came next, followed by Ohio. New York had 10 brigades in line. Massachusetts had 211 posts. New Jersey 70, Maine 15, California 14, Rhode Island 16, New Hampshire 17, Vermont 21, Maryland 49, Iowa 50, Oklahoma 1. The Department of Virginia and North Carolina marched 700 men in line. Nebraska, Texas, Alabama, North and South Dakota and Connecticut made a fine showing. The Pennsylvania department mustered 15,000 strong and was the largest in the long and splendid parade.

Wednesday opened with business sessions of the Grand Army, the Union Veterans’ Union, the Woman’s Relief Corps, the Ladies’ Aid to the S.of V., the Daughters of Veterans, Ladies of the Grand Army and Women’s Relief Union. In the afternoon a consolidated band of 1,500 pieces gave a patriotic concert in the Capitol grounds.

The post with the largest membership in the country naturally attracted much attention, and this was intensified by a mammoth model of the typical industry of the city in which it is located. It is General Lander post of Lynn, Mass., which numbers over 1,200 men. They carried with them an immense shoe, twelve feet long.

Preliminary to the festivities of the week was the dedication of Grand Army Place, located on the famous White Lot just south of the White House grounds.

A striking display was the surprise offered by the Iowa department. They carried in the air 3,000 cornstalks, some of them nearly six inches in diameter, and each man had an ear of corn strapped to his back.

Among the notable arrivals was that of the famous Sixth Massachusetts, the first to respond to President Lincoln’s call for troops. En route to Washington they were fired upon in Baltimore, April 19, and spilled the first blood after the assault upon Fort Sumter. Several hundred men were present with the command.

Col. A.G. Weissert, of Wisconsin, was elected National Commander and Indianapolis selected as the place of next year’s reunion.

Gettysburg Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Sep 27, 1892

NOTE: Both Images above are from Wikipedia

*****

The following obituaries all have a common thread. All men were Civil War veterans and all marched in the Grand Review of 1865 in Washington, D.C. Most of them also have some connection to the State of Pennsylvania, with one or two exceptions.

At the bottom of the post, there are two articles about Civil War animal mascots — a dog and a rooster.

Carson Lutz.

Carson Lutz, familiarly known to most people in the Glen Campbell and Burnside sections as “Kit Carson,” passed away in the home of a daughter in Hobart, Ind., Sunday, April 6. Following the services there his body was brought to Glen Campbell, his former home, where funeral services were conducted at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon in the Baptist Church, conducted by the Rev. Mr. Marks. Interment was made in Burnside Cemetery, alongside of his wife and daughter, who preceded him to the grave several years ago. It was a military funeral, conducted by members of the American Legion of Glen Campbell, assisted by a firing squad from the American Legion Post of Clearfield.

Carson Lutz was born in Lancaster county, September 5, 1848 and enlisted in Company B, Forty-fifth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers in January, 1864, being honorably discharged July 17, 1865. He was engaged in several battles and was present at Lee’s surrender. He was also proud of having marched with the million soldiers in the grand review at Washington, D.C.

He was one of the pioneers of the northern part of Indiana county and helped to cut and raft a great deal of timber that grew in that section. He sometimes worked as one of the woods crew, but mostly as the camp cook. His reputation as a cook was known to all old woodsmen and in later years he cooked for hunting camps, many of the deer hunters recalling “Kit” and his wonderful meals.

For the past 17 years he had made his home with his two daughters. He leaves the daughters, Mrs. James Judge of Hobart, Ind., and Mrs. C. Fred Brands of Gary, Ind.; two grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. At the time of his death he was a member of William Ketcham Post, Grand Army of the Republic of Gary, Ind.

Indiana Evening Gazette (Indiana, Pennsylvania) Apr 14, 1930

Image from Find-A-Grave (NOTE: previous image has been replaced due to copyright)

PROFESSOR WERT, LONG ILL, DIES

Former Head of County Schools Was Well Known Writer.

WROTE SEVERAL NOVELS

Took Part in Civil War Playing a Part in the Battle of Gettysburg. Wrote History of Conflict.

Professor J. Howard Wert, well known writer and educator, with many friends in Adams county where he was the superintendent of schools for several years, died Thursday night at his home in Harrisburg after a long illness at an advanced age. He had been seriously ill for some weeks and his death was not unexpected. For years he had been living retired.

Professor J. Howard Wert was born on a farm near Gettysburg, the only child of Adam and Catharine (Houghtelin) Wert. His father, a man of exceptional ability, was a leader among Pennsylvania Abolitionists. His mother, also very gifted, was very conspicuous in the annals of early Methodism in Southern Pennsylvania.

After a preliminary course in the rural public schools and the Gettysburg High School, in all of which he evinced a precocity which made him the marvel of the community, the deceased spent six years at Gettysburg College, graduating in 1861.

While in college, he acquired considerable reputation as a writer; becoming a contributor to nearly all the Boston and New York literary periodicals of that day.

His first serial, “The Mystic League of Three,” a novel in twenty chapters, written while in the Sophomore year, won a prize and was published in Frank Queen’s “New York Clipper.” Having been dramatized, it was produced soon after at one of the Bowery theaters, wit ha run of 4 consecutive nights. It was a story of sporting life in the large cities written at a time that the young author had never seen a larger town than Gettysburg.

In various capacities, Professor Wert saw many of the stirring scenes of the Civil War, including the battle of Gettysburg, where he had exceptional opportunities for observation both during and after the conflict. During the Gettysburg campaign he did considerable service as a scout for which he was well fitted by his intimate knowledge of the whole surrounding country. On the afternoon of the first day of the battle, he was the guide who conducted the head of General Slocum’s 12th corps to the position it subsequently held in Culp’s Hill, after having informed the officers leading the column of the positions which Early’s Confederate corps had gained on the other side of Rock Creek.

Concerning the decisive battle he had written many valuable articles and pamphlets, as well as an extended history, first published in 1886, which had sold extensively on trains and on the field for several years. A second Gettysburg battle history written for a New York syndicate as a souvenir gift to G.A.R. posts in connection with the Semi-Centennial celebration of 1913, and published from the plant of the Harrisburg Telegraph was characterized by a competent reviewer as “The most vivid pen-portraiture of the great battle ever written, and on of the finest specimens of historic word painting in the English language.”

The close of the war found Professor Wert a lieutenant in Company G, 209th Pennsylvania Volunteers. This regiment served first in Butler’s Army of the James, and then became a part of Hartranft’s celebrated Pennsylvania command, — the Third Division, Ninth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac. With it the deceased participated in some of the severest engagements around Richmond and Petersburg including the storming of the latter city; and followed up Lee’s retreating army to the surrender at Appomattox.

He also participated in the Grand Review of the Army of the Potomac, May 23, 1865, when, for seven continuous hours, 80,000 veterans, solidly massed from curb to curb, swept down Pennsylvania Avenue, at the nation’s capital, passing before President of the United States and General Grant.

The Gettysburg Times (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Mar 13, 1920

161st Indiana Infantry Band

Not the same Indiana Infantry Band – Read more about this one from the Spanish American War HERE

OBITUARY

Abram Rummel, one of the oldest and highly esteemed citizens of this place, was found dead Sunday morning in his chair at his home on the east side. He was found by his daughter, Margaret, who having heard him arrange the fire earlier in the day, thought he was sleeping and did not disturb him until the breakfast hour. Evidently he attended the fire and then sat down in his accustomed chair as was his wont to often sleep there rather than lie down owing to heart trouble, and of which he evidently died.

Mr. Rummel was born March 16, 1840, at Creswell, Lancaster county, Pa., the son of Adam and Anna Rummel, and was brought by his parents to this state in 1847. When a young man he joined his brothers Felix and Adam in the wagon making and smith trade at Germantown. While here he joined a local cornet band, which afterward tendered its services to Governor Morton and was assigned to the Twelfth Indiana Infantry as the regimental band and later the brigade band. Of this band Amos Bear of Richmond is the surviving member. After three years service the band was mustered out in 1865 after participating in the “grand review” at Washington. Returning to Germantown, Mr. Rummel was married to the love of his youth, Miss Mary Jane Ocker, who died July 19, 1913. The children are J. Willard Rummel of New Castle, and Mrs. Ida Martin and Miss Margeret Rummel of this city. Oscar Valentine died in 1875. The grandchildren are Miss Lula Martin of this city and Miss Thelma Rummel of New Castle.

In 1865 Mr. Rummel joined Walnut Level lodge of Odd Fellows, which membership he transferred to Wayne lodge when he and his brothers came to this city and engaged in business the same as in Germantown. Two years ago Wayne lodge gave him a veteran’s jewel, having been a member 50 years and financial secretary 20 years. He was also a member of the G.A.R. and M.E. church.

In 1881 Mr. Rummel was elected a town trustee and served five years. For a quarter of a century he was connected with the township assessor’s office, first as deputy and later assessor. In all those offices of honor and trust Mr. Rummel fitted his duty as he saw it. Whether as a soldier, a public servant, a lodge member, or a husband and father, he discharged his duties in that exalted manner that marks the exemplary citizen.

Funeral services were held at the M.E. church Tuesday afternoon by Rev. Jones, the W.R.C. and Odd Fellows. The attendance was large and the floral tributes many and very pretty. Burial in Riverside.

Cambridge City Tribune (Cambridge City, Indiana) Feb 8, 1917

Wisconsin Memorial at Vicksburg

Image from the book, Wisconsin at Vicksburg on Google

A SOLDIER’S RECORD

Interesting Account of Army Service During Civil War By the Late A.N. Maltby.

A.N. Maltby, who died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. J.N. Welsbey, last Wednesday afternoon, was a Civil war veteran and took part in Sherman’s “March to the Sea” and the Grand Review at Washington. Among the Possessions he left was a brief account of his army record, which is published below and will undoubtedly prove interesting to Gazette readers:

“I enlisted August 7, 1862, at Tomah, Wis. The company was quartered in Sparta and joined the regiment at La Crosse. Was mustered into United States service September 14, 1862, with Co. D, 25th Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry.

“The regiment was ordered to Minnesota on October 1 and D company was stationed at Mankato to protect the city from the Indians. In December of that year the regiment was ordered back to Wisconsin and we marched from Mankato to La Crocce. Arrived at Madison Dec. 20, when we all got a ten day furlough.

“In the February following we went south via Chicago and Cairo, Ill., and went int camp at Columbus, Ky., where we stayed until Jun 1, when we went down the Mississippi river to Vicksburg, then up the Yazoo river to Yazoo City, then back to Haynes Bluff, in the rear of Vicksburg, where we were in the siege until the surrender on July 4, 1863. On July 7, I got sick furlough home for 30 days, and rejoined my company and regiment at Helena, Ark., September 1. At this time the 25th had only 57 men fit for duty and 800 men on the company rolls. In February we left Helena and went again to Vicksburg and from that place on the ‘Meridian March’ with Sherman. We were back in Vicksburg at the end of 30 days and then went by steamboat up the Mississippi to Cairo, then up the Ohio and the Tennessee rivers to Mussels Sholes,, then by rail to Decatur, Ala. From there we marched to Chatanooga, Tenn., and on the first of May, 1864, started with General Sherman on the Atlanta campaign.

“At this time the 25th was in the Second Brigade, 4th Division, 16th Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee. This division was in the flanking corps and was all the time marching or fighting. Our first battle was at Resaca, May 14, 1864. The company and regiment took part in all the fighting, including the battle of Atlanta, and the chase after General Hood’s Confederates back toward Chattanooga. At Atlanta Co. D lost just one-half of the company in killed, wounded and prisoners. Of the four captured, three were wounded and died in the Andersonville prison, while the fourth was exchanged.

“Before beginning the March to the Sea we were reorganized and our brigade, the 43rd and 63rd Ohio, the 17th New York and the 35th New Jersey was the 2nd Brigade, 7th Division, 17th Army Corps, General Mower Division Commander.

“The March to the Sea began in Nov. 1864, and before Christmas we had taken the city of Savannah, Ga. In January, 1865, we went by transport to Beaufort, S.C., and captured Fort Pokatolligo. On February 1 we began the march for Richmond, Va. Our last battle was at Bentonville, N.C. Was at Raleigh,  N.C., when General Johnson and army surrendered to Sherman. From Raleigh we marched through Richmond and Petersburg to Washington; took part in the Grand Review and was mustered out the 7th day of June, 1865, by reason of the end of the war.

“I was appointed corporal August 27, 1862, at La Crosse, and sergeant October 1, 1863, by M. Montgomery, colonel commanding the regiment. I was in every march, skirmish and battle in which the regiment took part and was in command of the company in its last battle at Bentonville,  N.C. At the time we were mustered out at Washington, D.C., I was offered a brevet captaincy and refused it.”

The Gazette (Stevens Point, Wisconsin) Feb 16, 1916

Image from Find-A-Grave for Barney B. Bartow

GEORGE WASHINGTON WEIGHT.

A Respected Citizen And An Old Soldier Entered Into Rest.

On Tuesday morning about ten o’clock, the life of George Washington Weight, one of Snyder township’s respected citizens, passed into the eternal world. As he was born and raised in this community he was known as an upright, honest man, who always did unto others as he would have them do unto him. He had always been a strong, robust man and used to hard work. Last Friday he caught a heavy cold which developed into pneumonia and on account of his advanced age he was not able to withstand the disease and death ended his sufferings at the above mentioned time.

When the was clouds of the Rebellion hung heavy over our country, he was among the brave boys that went to the front to fight for the flag and country that he loved. He placed his life as a sacrifice on the country’s altar, but was among the fortunate that escaped the ravages of bullets and shell, although the many hardships that he and many of the old veterans experienced was enough to kill any man. He was a member of Company D, 208th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. This regiment was in the Third brigade, Third division and Ninth army corps of the Potomac. He fought at Hatchers Run, in February, 1865, and was in the attack on Fort Stedman, March 25, 1865. He was also in the fight Petersburg and was present when that city surrendered to the Union army. His regiment pursued Lee along South Side railroad to Notaway court house and only halted in their march when the news reached them that the brave southern General had surrendered at Appomotox court house. Comrade Weight participated in all these engagements and was honorably discharged June 1, 1865, at the close of the war, after which he took part in the grand review in Washington. He returned to his home at Ironsville after the war and followed his occupation, that of a knobler, at the Tyrone Forge.

In August, 1858, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Woomer, who preceded him to the grave December 25, 1894. When only a young man Mr. Weight united with the Methodist Epsicopal church, at Ironsville and he always endeavored to live according to its teachings. He was an active member of Colonel D.M. Jones post No. 172, G.A.R., and always delighted to participate in any meetings held by this organization.

George Washington Weight was born near Ironsville, December 11, 1833 and was aged 74 years, 11 months and 13 days at the time of his death. He leave to mourn his demise the following children: Thomas Weight, of Tyrone; Harry Weight, Mrs. Viola Gillman, Mrs. Grove Cox, Sylvester Calvin and Walter, of Ironsville; General Grant, of East Altoona, and Mrs. Katharine Mingle, of Birmingham. Also one brother, Thomas Weight, of Ironsville.

The funeral services will be held in the Methodist Episcopal church at Ironsville, on Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock, conducted by Rev. Gordon Gray, the pastor. The funeral cortege will leave the house promptly at fifteen minutes of two o’clock and proceed to the church. Interment will be made in Grand View cemetery. The services at the grave will be in charge of Col. D.M. Jones post No. 172, G.A.R., of which he was a charter member.

Tyrone Daily Herald (Tyrone, Pennsylvania) Nov 25, 1908

Image from the website: Wisconsin Civil War Battle Flags

ARUNAH B. DWINELL DEAD

Well Known Citizen and Supervisor of the Sixth Ward Passes Away Very Suddenly This Morning.

For nearly four months A.B. Dwinell of this city had been in failing health, and had been confined to his home under the care of a physician for just eight weeks. The first three or four weeks of this time he suffered greatly, but since then had been apparently much improved and was able to rest comfortably most of the time, both day and night, something that he had not been able to do at first. On one or two occasions during the past couple of weeks his condition was considered critical at brief intervals, however, but he soon revived from these spells and was apparently on the road to enjoy better health. While fully realizing that his condition was most serious, and having expressed the opinion that he could not survive, making this remark for the last time yesterday, he was ever cheerful and did not complain, seeming to be ever solicitous for his faithful wife and daughters, who rarely left his side, even for a moment, during the past eight weeks. Last night he retired at about 9:30 o’clock and slept soundly throughout the night. Soon after 6 o’clock this morning Mrs. Dwinell heard her husband cough in a ajoining room, but as this was not unusual, she did not at once arise, getting up a few minutes later, however, and when she approached his bedside, she was horrified to find that her husband had passed away. He was lying peacefully as though in sweet sleep, having his hands folded over his breast and had undoubtedly died without a struggle. His illness and death was due to a compilation of dropsy and heart trouble.

Arunah B. Dwinell was born at Erie, Pa., May 13, 1838, and was therefore in the 70th year of his age. When about 12 years of age his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Luther H. Dwinell, moved to Michigan and after a short stay in that state, came to Fond du Lac and thence to Portage county in 1850, this having been the home of the now deceased ever since. His father died in Stockton in 1870 and is mother in 1878. The son remained on the homestead in the town of Stockton until he enrolled as a soldier in the civil war in September, 1861.

He enlisted at Plover in Co. B., 14th Wis. Infantry. The regiment organized at Fond du Lac, where it remained until March 6, 1862, when it proceeded to Benton Barracks, St. Louis, and after a stay of two weeks went to Savannah, Tenn. Orders were received to join the forces of Grant at Pittsburg Landing, and the regiment in which Mr. Dwinell was serving moved to embark on the transport, but did not arrive on the field until nearly midnight of April 6th, they forming in line of battle at once, notwithstanding heavy rain was falling. They went into action and fought on the second day of the battle, where they acquitted themselves with conspicuous bravery. Mr. Dwinell performed provost duty at Pittsburg Landing until he was taken sick and sent to the hospital at St. Louis, where after two weeks he received a furlough for fifteen days, which was extended, and he reported to Gen. Gaylord at Madison and remained in the hospital there until the fall of 1862, when he received an honorable discharge and returned to Plover. Aug. 21, 1864, he again enlisted, this time in Co. F, 5th Wis. Infantry, in the reorganized command. On the formation of his company he was made orderly sergeant and proceeded with his command to the Army of the Potomac, where he was connected with duty on the Orange & Alexandria R.R., for a brief time. Thereafter he went to the Shenandoah Valley, where the regiment joined the “Independent Battalion,” the remainder of the old 5th, at Winchester. They then went to Cedar Creek, the command being engaged in skirmishing on the right. At the latter place the soldiers were given the privilege of voting, and Mr. Dwinell’s second vote was cast for Abraham Lincoln. December 1st they went to Petersburg, going into winter quarters in front of that city, Mr. Dwinell performing picket duty until Feb. 5, 1865. He was in the fight at Hatcher’s Run and afterwards at Ft. Fisher, and in April in the charge of Petersburg, his knapsack being shot from his back on the morning of the second day of that month and he was slightly wounded in the shoulder in the afternoon. The next day he was in pursuit of Lee and fought on the 7th at Sailor’s Creek, where the entire force of rebels were killed or captured. He also took part in the surrender at Appomatox, after which he went to Danville to the assistance of Sherman, but went back to Wilson Station and thence to Washington, where he was in the Grand Review and was discharged at Madison, June 20, 1865, returning to the village of Plover. December 15, 1861, he was married to Ida E. Morrill, who survives him. They were the parents of nine children, two of whom, Edith died at the age of two years, and Fred J. passed away at Rugby, N.D., four years ago the 16th of June. Those who survive are George L., sheriff of Waukesha county, Arthur J. of Rugby, N.D., Ada B., now Mrs. C.W. Rhodes of Madison, Allie, now Mrs. G.S. Putney of Waukesha. Miss Ethel, who is employed as stenographer for the Wilbor Lumber Co. at Waukesha, Bernice, now Mrs. John C. Miller of Madison, but who is ill in a Chicago hospital, and the Misses Beatrice and Ida E., who are at home, the latter being employed as stenographer in the law offices of McFarland & Murat. He also leaves one brother, C.H. Dwinell of this city, and two sisters, Mrs. Amasa Ball of Idaho and Mrs. Clara Perkins, who resides somewhere in the west.

Mr. Dwinell had resided in this city since 1878 and had served as alderman and supervisor, being elected as supervisor again at the April election. He was a man of far more than ordinary ability, shrewd, sharp and progressive, and he always took an active interest in home, state and national affairs. In politics he was a Democrat for a number of years, but for the past several years had been affiliated with the Republican party. The only organization that he belonged to was the Grand Army Post, being a charter member of the local society.

The time of the funeral has not been fully decided, and will not be until the arrival of his sons and daughters, but will probably not take place until Sunday afternoon. Rev. James Blake of the Baptist church will officiate and the officers of the local Post will not doubt conduct the services at the grave.

The Gazette (Stevens Point, Wisconsin) Jul 24, 1907

Jack Brutus belonged to the Connecticut military troops during the Spanish-American War.  I couldn’t find a picture of  “Jack,” the Civil War bulldog. More Civil War mascots can be found at the Fort Ward Museum website.

Dog Had Prominent Part in the Civil War

Twice wounded, three time taken prisoner and having fought in a score of battles during the civil war, was part of the interesting career of “Jack,” a bulldog, which accompanied members of the old Niagara fire department when they enlisted and became a part of the One Hundred and Second Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers. Through the entire war he wore a collar that cost $75, and before he died, several years later, this collar was adorned with several medals, worth several hundred dollars. When he died, this ornament was left around his neck and the body was wrapped in a small American flag before being buried.

Jack accompanied the regiment through the following battles: Yorktown, the battle of Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Savage Station, Malvern Hill, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Marv’s Heights, Mine Run, the Seven Days’ Battle, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Petersburg, the defense of Washington, July 11, 1864, Winchester, Flint Hill, Fisher’s Hill and Middletown.

At the battle of Malvern Hill he was shot through the shoulder and back. At Salem Heights he was captured, held a prisoner and exchanged for a Confederate soldier. During the engagement at Savage Station he was again taken prisoner, but detained only six hours. During the entire war he followed the regiment, and when the army assembled in Washington for the grand review Jack was one of the conspicuous features of the parade. He was taken to one of the northern counties of the state by one of the officers of the regimental association, who kept him until he died.

The Indianapolis Star (Indianapolis, Indiana) May 21, 1911

A TRAVELED ROOSTER.

When the 16th regiment marched through town, a little white bantam rooster was observed perched on the knapsack of one of the men. We learn that it has an interesting history. It was carried from Madison in 1863 and taken into the ranks of the 32d regiment, which it accompanied through the Mississippi march to Meridian and back to Vicksburg, thence to Decatur, Alabama, and on the march to Atlanta, at whose capture it was present on the grand march through Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina, to Raleigh. With the 32d it went north to Washington and with it passed in the grand review.

Subsequently it was transferred to the 16th veterans and in now mustered out and on its way home. The little fellow had been carried on the knapsack the entire rounds, and has been in all the battles and skirmishes in which the 32d has participated. — Madison Journal.

Cedar Falls Gazette (Cedar Falls, Iowa) Aug 4, 1865

Seth Bullock’s “Cowboy Brigade” attends Teddy Roosevelt’s Inauguration

November 16, 2009
Indian_chiefs roosevelt inaugurationo

Image from Wiki

A commenter asked if I had a source that listed Jim Dahlman as one of Seth Bullock’s Cowboy Brigade, that attended Teddy Roosevelt’s inauguration. I did some searching over the weekend, and found one source, which is noted in the post. NOTE: They incorrectly listed his given name as Bill, rather than Jim.

***

ROUGH RIDERS AND COWBOYS THERE

National Capitol Filled by Throngs for the Inauguration.

QUITE COSMOPOLITAN CROWD

Governors and Staffs in Gold Braided Uniforms, Indians in Blankets and Filipinos Mingle With the Gathering of the Plain People.
[excerpt]

Seth Bullock’s cowboys, fifty-one strong, arrived yesterday afternoon, very tired and thirsty after a thirty-hour ride. The rangers were attired in the conventional cowboy costume. Those in the crowd who expected them to carry six-shooters were not disappointed. Each of Seth’s boys wore a leather bolster, in which was a formidable looking, long barrel gun. Buckskin trousers, gayly decorated shirts and broad-rimmed sombreros composed the uniform in which they were attired.

Cowboys Have a Frolic.

When the contingent got to the nearby hotel, at which they were corraled, all hands washed up and then scattered in twos or threes to see the town. Three of them found the stable where their mounts are being cared for, and getting astride of their horses, started out for a frolic on Pennsylvania avenue. For the edification of the crowd they did a little rope throwing, each man tossing his noose over the head of one of his companions. But this became tiresome after a while and a few exhibition throws were given to the delight of the crowds and the alarm of the diminutive negroes who were invariably the targets.

Last night most of the cowboy company called on Captain Seth at the Shor?ham hotel. They liked the looks of the place and some of them spent the evening there.

The cowboys will be the guest of Senator Kittredge of South Dakota at 9 o’clock breakfast Sunday and in the afternoon will be taken around the city in automobiles. No set programme has been arranged in the meantime, but the whole town is anxious to do them honor and everything is free whenever the cowboys appear in cafes.

The Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Mar 3, 1905

Seth Bullock Cowboy Brigage

I saved this picture above, but forgot to note the source, and now I can’t find it again. This lists 40 of the 60 cowboys, and the picture appears to be cut off on the sides, so maybe the rest of them (including Jim Dahlman, who is NOT listed) were off to the side.

UPDATE: Carl Steiger found the website where I originally found this image. It is called Cowboys & Images. Here is a link to the image. Thanks, Carl!

seth bullock moralizes header 1905

By Seth Bullock.

First Sheriff of Deadwood, S.D., Chief of the Black Hills Forest Rangers, Commanding the Cowboy Brigade in the Inaugural Procession.

Washington, Friday — Looking at it from the top of a cayuse, this inauguration appears mighty significant to me. President Roosevelt has already put his mark on the country. Al the end of another four years the Roosevelt brand will be so clear it won’t wear off for many moons.

The crowds in Washington today show the Roosevelt spirit. The people are mostly bright and energetic, typical of the President. It’s just like it is on the range. IF the owner of a ranch is an active, honest, hard-working man, you can tell his cowboys as far as you can see the outfit, by the vigorous way they work. If the owner is dissolute, dishonest or lazy, the cowboys are likely to be the same way.

Now, long before most of us in Dakota knew Roosevelt we used to hear about him.

Cowboys riding down to our country from 150 miles away used to say:

“That fellow Roosevelt up there on the Little Missouri is dead square. He don’t maverick anybody else’s calves. He don’t ask a man to ride a horse he don’t ride, and he don’t make any man stand a watch on the roundup that he ain’t ready to stand himself.”

Teddy_Roosevelt inauguration

That is the kind of reputation Roosevelt had in the cattle country, where the things a man does and not what he talks about makes his reputation. He’s no fair weather sailor, and our boys out West know it. That’s the reason sixty boys have come down here with me. Nearly all of them have ridden on the range, and a good many of them used to know Theodore, and they are all strong for him. They have to sell their ponies to get back, all because they wanted to see one of their own people, or rather, a man who had lived with them, and is as much or more a Westerner than Easterner, inaugurated as President.

With Roosevelt in the White House this talk of sectionalism is going to be stamped out. The way this inauguration has brought together Westerners and Easterners and

Northerners and Southerners means a lot to the future of this country.
It looks to me like the people who were coming to this inauguration were the kind who like the man who does real stunts and don’t delay. That’s the reason the cowpunchers like him.

We haven’t any fear of him being too impetuous. You don’t hear any of that talk about him on the range. The boys there just say he has keen and accurate instinct.

The sixty boys with me are not Rough Riders; they are not Black Hills rangers; they are not dime novel heroes or stage robbers. They are cowboys, and as such are the real article, and the reason they are here is because this is the first inauguration of a man who knows them and whom they know as square in the White House as he was on the range.

One of the boys rode 120 miles in twenty-four hours to get his horse on the train before it left Deadwood. We have all ages in the company.

Henry Roberts, who is fifteen, was born on the range, and as good a rider as any one. There are men who have been cowboys for thirty years. Two of the boys belong to the Black Hills Forest Rangers, whose business it is to protect the trees in the Black Hills forest reserve. Most of the rest are from South Dakota and Wyoming.

Theodore has asked the boys to come back to the White House after the procession has passed the reviewing stand. They will ride up to the steps under the porte cochere, where he will stand and shake hands with each man.

Now, that is a mighty nice thing, for some of the boys are bashful and would be lost if the President invited them to the reception. But they are never bashful in the saddle. Every one of them appreciates the chance to shake Theodore’s hand.

I’m willing to bet he will remember each man that he knew when he lived in Dakota. His memory for faces and the names that go with them is certainly wonderful. Blaine’s memory for faces, some persons say, was largely bluff, but it is straight goods with the President.

I remember when he made his last Western trip the boys on the South Dakota range rode to meet him whenever the train stopped at the water tank. OUt of crowds he would single out men whom he had not laid eyes on for twenty years. He would remember exactly where he had last seen them. On that trip he would alwys go out to see the cowboys who rode to meet the train.

“Why,” said he, “those boys have never seen a President of the United States. They have ridden a long way to this train. It’s my duty to go out and speak to them.”

There is a horse with a Maltese cross brand running on the range now, and I tried to get one of the boys to bring it down here, but it could not be arranged. The Roosevelt brand was a Maltese cross., and he branded that horse.

We from out West don’t know all the full made over the questions or precedence. It was necessary for me to go to Mr. Warner’s headquarters today. He is the head of the civic division, and talking to him was a man wearing a uniform that looked like the morning after the Fourth of July. Honest, it would make a cowboy jump over the monument. He was making a great row because his marching club, which had been in every inauguration since the Lord knows when, had been given a place behind the Roosevelt Club of Minneapolis, which had never marched at any inauguration.

“I’ll see what I can do about it,” siad Mr. Warner.

Then I took the uniformed man by the arm. “Don’t kick,” I told him. ‘If you try to change your position, every one else will want to change theirs, and the whole parade will go to smash. We are going to ride wherever we are placed. Anyway, wherever the cowboys are, that is the head of the procession for us. Don’t kick.”

Here is our official poem, by the official poet, Bob Carr:

Us punchers sling no haughty style,
Nor go we much on manners;
We look on dudelets out this way
As only fit for “canners;”
And that is why you hear us cry
We’re always glad and ready
To throw our hats and let a yell
In honor of our Teddy.

The boys are having a first-rate time in Washington. We have no rules except these.

Rule 1. Don’t kick.
Rule 2. Don’t knock.
Rule 3. Neither kick nor knock.
***

Seth_and_teddy

Seth Bullock and Teddy Roosevelt

Washington — Say, we found ourselves among a lot of friendly Indians today. The boys like the way the crowd, all the way from Capitol Butte to by White Ranch House, put out their hand.

Not one is sorry he came, especially after the way Theodore met us after we had ranged up past the reviewing stand. He had the boys ride up to the door of the ranch house and shook hands with each, and remembered every one he knew nineteen years ago on the Little Missouri, when he had the Maltese Cross outfit.

Every cowboy in the brigade was mightily impressed with the ceremony today. A lot of them have never been east of the Missouri River, and, although they are as keen as can be found anywhere, this visit to Washington is just the thing they needed to show them what a great country this is.

As far as that goes, I think no one can come to Washington from any part of the United States without being struck by the almighty bigness of the Government. They get an idea, too, what their Representatives are doing for them, and it is a lot. Neither of our Senators from South Dakota nor our Representatives can make his expenses out of his salary.

There is a lot of patriotism in this country, and it certainly stuck out all over this town today.

I saw millionaires waving flags and yelling themselves hoarse for the President, and when we cowboys came along there in front of his reviewing stand we got the glad hand from the President more than any one else we saw.

Compared with the noise made by the plug-hat-and-boiled-shirt political clubs, the cowboy brigade was Quakerish and decorous. To the President it made no difference where a club came from, or whether or not it represented a lot of cash. If the people in the organization were good, clean-cut, likely appearing Americans the President would lean over the rail and wave his hat to them.

Every man in the thirty thousand marching today ought to know, unless he is plumb locoed, that the boy who is now in the White House is game, and will do just what he says — give a square deal to every man. That is the reason the cowboys who are with me came down here. They want to show their appreciation of having one of their own kind of men in the saddle ready to brand every proposition according to his merits, and to rope any job that comes its way, and not ask any man to do anything he isn’t willing to do himself.

A man who is big enough to build the Panama Canal and put irrigation ditches all through the West and make it blossom like a rose and insist on a navy large enough to keep the door open in China is the man for us.

The cowboys in this brigade are a clean cut, sober, industrious lot, and when you find sixty such men who are agreed that the President is O.K. you can just mark it down that their verdict is straight goods.

It meant a lot to us to see those hundreds of thousands of people rounded up in Washington to watch Theodore become President on his own responsibility. It is all right to talk about the splendor of the durbars in India, but they are not to be compared with this. The durbar is an outfit of people who ride and do other stunts because they are ordered to. The people who attend the inaugural do it because they want to. Of course, some of the army and navy are ordered to Washington, but if they were not they would like to come independently.

I am a great believer in the flag and the effect it has on gatherings like these. The best thing for this country would be for every man and woman to get a chance to come to Washington and rub up against people from other ranges.

Some of the boys are pretty much impressed with the number of white people in the East.

They put us pretty well back in the procession, but we did not care, for our rules are, “Don’t kick, don’t knock; neither kick nor knock.”

We were formed down near the Capitol and the critters stood the waiting pretty well. They are used to brilliant Western sunsets, but that was the only thing that saved them from bolting when these gold lace Governors’ staffs went loping by.

We are going to have an auction on Monday, and all the cayuses will be knocked down to the highest bidder. They will make mighty good polo ponies, although their past work has been mostly chasing wayward, stray cattle, instead of a little white ball. They have to be sold so the boys will have enough money to get home on. Then some of them want a little cash to blow in over in New York, where they are going before they start back to the range.

These boys can go some if necessary, but there are not likely to be any fireworks from them in New York. They just want to learn the difference between the taste of salt water and prairie hay.

We will all be gone from Washington pretty soon. It has been a great round-up — about the most successful ever held, I guess. Theodore certainly did make good medicine.

The Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) Mar 8, 1905

aobrodie

Alexander O. Brodie (Image from http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net)

BRODIE AND BULLOCK

Fine Types of the American Western Frontiersman.

BOTH FRIENDS OF PRESIDENT.

Brodie Has Been Regular Army Officer, Indian Fighter, Civil Engineer, Rough Rider, and Territorial Governor — Seth Bullock, Sheriff, Cowpuncher, and an All-around “Good ‘Bad Man.'”

A notable figure in the escort accompanying President Roosevelt from the White House to the Capitol yesterday and again in the grand parade which later swept up the Avenue was that of Col. Alexander O. Brodie at the head of the Rough Riders, President Roosevelt’s old Spanish war regiment. Col. Brodie and his men were recognized at every point along the route and greeted with generous applause.

Col. Brodie is a typical frontiersman, but he is much more than that. He has been cadet at West Point, officer in the regular army, Indian fighter, civil and mining engineer, major and lieutenant in the Rough Riders under Col. Roosevelt, and until recently governor of the Territory of Arizona. He came to Washington about ten days ago and was sworn in as major in the regular army and was assigned to be assistant to the military secretary, United States army.

Col. Brodie was graduated from West Point in 1870 and assigned immediately to the First United States Cavalry. With that regiment he saw stirring service on the frontier for seven years’ fighting Indians all over the Western border. He was in the hard campaign against the White Mountain Indians in 1871, with Gen. Brooke in all of that gallant officer’s fights in 1872 and 1873, and in the fierce Nez Perce campaign of 1877. Then he resigned from the army, and for twenty years practiced civil and mining engineering in the West.

When the Rough Rider regiment was organized at the beginning of the Spanish war in 1898, Brodie jumped to the front, and was commissioned major, and upon the promotion of Col. Wood and Lieut. Col. Roosevelt, he was advanced to the position of second in command, an office he held when the regiment was mustered out at the close of the war.

Col. Brodie enjoys the personal friendship of President Roosevelt. They were very “chummy” during the campaign in Cuba. It is not strange that President Roosevelt should have desired that a detachment of his old command should have a position of honor in the inaugural parade, nor that he should have selected Col. Brodie to lead it.

Seth Bullock’s Cowboys.

Another feature of the parade was Seth Bullock’s cowboys,, seventy-five in number mounted on their Western bronchos and headed by the redoubtable Seth himself. Sheriff Bullock is the sheriff of Deadwood, S.D., and he is what might be termed “a good ‘bad man.'” He is the idol of all the South Dakota cow-punchers and has the reputation of having “rounded up” more truly “bad men” than any other official in all the wild West. Like Col. Brodie, he enjoys the personal friendship of President Roosevelt. In line with Seth Bullock’s “bunch” were cow-punchers of no less renown than “Deadwood Dick” Clarke, the once famous scout, bandit, hunter, and leader of the shotgun men who guarded the old Wells-Fargo treasure coaches from Deadwood to civilization more than a quarter of a century ago. “Tex” Burgess, the king of the cowboys on the big Hyannis range in Nebraska, was another prominent figure in the unique organization. Seth Bullock, “Deadwood Dick,” Clarke and “Tex” Burgess are all men of types that with the advance of civilization are fast disappearing from the Western plains and will soon have passed away altogether. The once famous “Deadwood Dick,” the hero of the dime novels of twenty-five years ago, and the man who in pioneer days was the terror of evildoers in Dakota, and performed miraculous feats of daring, is now a workman in plain blue overalls in the railway yards at Lead, a town not far from Deadwood.

Richard Clarke

Richard Clarke (aka Deadwood Dick)

Lots of great pictures at FARWEST.IT, which is where I found the  above picture. The website is in Spanish.

“Deadwood Dick” Praises President.

When “Deadwood Dick” was asked by Seth Bullock to come along to Washington to help inaugurate President Roosevelt he wrote back, saying:

“Sure, I’ll go down to Washington to see Teddy inaugurated. We old Westerners feel that he is one of us and shall be glad to help give him a send-off. I reckon the cowpunchers will cut quite a figure when they get down there, but they will be no novelty to the President, for he used to be one of them himself, you know. But a good many other folks will look on ’em with a good deal of interest and curiosity. I think he is doin’ the right thing in invitin’ the boys to take part in the show. It tickles ’em nearly to death to know that he wants ’em to ride their cayuses in the parade. Some of the boys used to know ‘Teddy’ when he was a rancher out West, and they all have a mighty warm spot in their hearts for him.”

Tex Burgess

Tex Burgess

The above picture (I cropped it) can be found in the book, The Overland Monthly (Google Books,) which contains the essay/article, A Cowboy Carnival: A Veracious Chronicle of a Stirring Incident by Ella Thorngate; pgs 50-60. The article includes other names, such as Doc Middleton, who is also in the uncropped picture.

Texas Burgess’ Comments.

“Tex” Burgess, who rode his pony all the way from Hyannis, Neb., to Belle Fourche, S.D., to join the cowboys on the trip to Washington, said, when he was invited to join the expedition:

“You just bet I’m goin’. I wouldn’t miss it for $1,000. We all want to go, but Capt. Bullock says he can’t accommodate all of us, so some of us will have to stay at home. Most of those who are goin’ are from the Black Hills. Only a few will come from the Hyannis and other ranges in Nebraska. I wished to go, and Capt. Bullock has promised to take me. ‘Billy’ Binder and ‘Doc’ Williams, and some of the others of the more noted riders in this region want to go, too, but I don’t know whether they will. We are mighty pleased at the invitation to take part in the show.”

Washington Post, The (Washington, D.C.) Mar 5, 1905

**This is the article mentioned at the beginning of the post, which names Dahlman as one of the “cowboys” who attended the inauguration. **Note: They got his first name wrong.

WASHINGTON, AFLUTTER, DONNING GALA ATTIRE

Imposing Court of Honor in Pennsylvania Avenue.

INAUGURATION GAYETY BEGUN

Glee Clubs Parade and Serenade and Cowboys Make Things Lively —

Scenes in the Streets.

Special to The New York Times. [excerpt]

Seth Bullock’s cowboys have started in on the time of their lives. They are sixty strong, and have brought two carloads of the best bronchos and cayuse ponies they could find in Nebraska and the Black Hills.

It would be absolutely impossible to pick a matched pair in the lot. Every color known in the Western cowboy horse stock is represented. They are dun, gray, calico, mouse-colored, bay, black, white, chestnut, piebald, and even the much loved blue bronco type is there. The blue bronco is the toughest horse ever made. The cowboys brought numerous saddles and abundance of trappings.
Cowboys “Feel of” the Asphalt.

To-day they geared up and went out to “feel of” the asphalt, of which they had been warned. It has happened at inaugurations that cavorting horses have slipped and thrown their riders. On one occasion an officer suffered a broken leg. On another Gen. Miles fell with his horse in the plaza in front of the Capitol Hotel.

The negro stableboys have been struck with wonder at the antics of the Westerners. The fun began when Bill [Jim] Dahlman, the boon friend of William J. Bryan, whirled out into the street from the corral where the cowboys keep their ponies, and with a yell said “Good-bye.”

The next moment there was another yell, this time from a colored boy standing by, who had been swiftly roped by Dahlman.

From that time on it was touch and go with a score or two of cowboys and the negroes standing around. The cowboys, some of whom are bankers, State officials, and lawyers who have at some time or other followed the range, wore their chaps and spurs and their tailor-made coats and overcoats and derby hats. This they will do when riding for practice or to get the hang of the town, but they have come with their full regalia, including lariats, quirts, chaps, ladigoes, twenty-ounce hats, and big red neckerchiefs, and will wear the whole outfit on Saturday, and when they get down to business of paying their respects to the town.

They had a job to-day shoeing their ponies. Thirty of them had never been shod and were unused to the etiquette of Mike McCormick’s blacksmith shop, where the operation was performed. They boys stayed by and it was a jolly scene. Some of the ponies had to be thrown, and with two men sitting on them Mike went ahead with the work as best he could.

A squad of cowboys during the afternoon rode the length of Pennsylvania Avenue, cutting in and out between street cars and passing vehicles with wonderful skill and at high speed. They roped colored boys again, and now and then a peanut vendor or a dog, and wound up by roping each other and getting all tied up in a bunch, in which manner they rode home and disentangled and unsaddled for the night.

Monday they will put the whole lot of horses up at auction for polo ponies, hoping to get what they cost and possibly the expense of transportation out of them.

The New York Times, Mar 3, 1905

Link to the actual news article is HERE. (PDF)

seth bullock cowboys event ad 1905

BULLOCK’S BOYS SELL PONIES.

Cow Punchers’ Exhibition Takes on a Commercial Aspect.

Capt. Seth Bullock’s cowboys sold their wild Western broncos at the Seventh street baseball park yesterday afternoon, but because of the rain and the soft condit on the ground the “stunts” which a large crowd of people went out to see were postponed until to-day at the same hour. No steers were tied — there were no steers — and there were no races. As it was, the ponies cut up the diamond and the outfield with their hoofs while the cowboys were showing off their points and a steam roller will probably be in demand before the ball season opens.

The spectators in spite of the cold rain were enthusiastic. They stood ankle deep in mud and slush and were spattered with mud with good grace while watching the little riding which the bronco busters performed in order to show how gentle their horses were. The ponies brought from $45 to $90, but only five were sold. One or two of the best animals were held at $100 by their owners, and the cowboys expect to dispose of these before they go to their homes in the West.

Capt. Bullock directed the sale and under his supervision the boys put their ponies through the paces, ran them and walked them past the buyers while the cowboys themselves alternated as auctioneers and knocked the beasts down to the highest bidders. Some of the purchasers looked at their newly-acquired horses with misgiving, looked them in the teeth, so to speak. Most of the horses were stripped of them cowboy saddles and sent off to livery stables to be clipped and Easternized. A few of the bolder buyers tried their ponies out on the spot and the cowboys had a lot of fun seeing the city chaps in derbys and overcoats scampering across the park range, clinging to the pommels, and scattering lead pencils and other belongings at every jump.

The exhibition postponed from yesterday will be given to day, rain or shine. It is the special wish of those in charge of the inauguration exercises that the cowboys receive the hearty co-operation of the citizens, as they came a long distance and have added so much to the entertainment of the people, as well as showing the type of man who spends his life on the plains of the far West.

Capt. Bullock took great care in selecting this company of men and each is a splendid specimen of manhood and all are adept in some particular accomplishment, which will add to the enjoyment of the exhibit. The programme is replete with thrilling and amusing events, and will positively take place to day at 2:30 p.m.

Washington Post, The (Washington, D.C.) Mar 8, 1905