Posts Tagged ‘Wisconsin’

Irving Zuelke Music Company

December 18, 2012

Irving Zuelke - Merry Christmas - Appleton Post Crescent WI 24 Dec 1921

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Dec 24, 1921

From GenDisasters:

Business District of Appleton Threatened

(Special to The Northwestern)

Appleton, Wis. – In sub-zero weather, firemen from Appleton and five surrounding cities fought a fire at the corner of College avenue and Oneida street, which, for a time, threatened the entire business section of this city. While it was possible to prevent spread of the flames, the structure attacked was completely destroyed, with a loss estimated at a quarter of a million dollars.

The property involved was a brick building, directly at the corner with a frontage of sixty feet, on College avenue, and 100 feet deep along Oneida street. It was occupied by two stores and several offices. It was owned by Irving Zuelke and his loss on the building alone is placed at $65,000. All that remains standing is the front wall, and that will have to be razed…. [more at the link above.]

The Daily Northwestern, Oshkosh, WI 26 Jan 1928

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Before the fire:

Irving Zuelke - new store 1 - Appleton Post Crescent WI 18 Dec 1924

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Irving Zuelke - new store 2 - Appleton Post Crescent WI 18 Dec 1924

SEVERAL thousand people, many of whom came from cities as far as 100 miles away, visited Irving Zuelke’s new music store at the corner of Oneida -st and College-ave during his formal opening. The store is one of the finest of its kind in the middlewest, comparing very favorably with the best in the largest cities.

Enormous changes have been made in the interior of the building, as well as in the exterior. Every possible convenience for customers and for the business has been installed. All the rooms are beautifully appointed and arrangements were made for the fastest service for customers.

The main floor, used largely for general display purposes, is beautifully finished and well arranged. Highly decorative lighting fixtures have been installed and soft carpets add to the elegance of the room.

The display windows on two sides of the building are attracting a great deal of attention. They are spacious and so arranged that they can be decorated with the maximum effectiveness. Wax figures are used effectively in decorating the windows.

The piano room, radio room and phonograph room are on the third floor and a recital hall also has been fitted up on that floor.

The sales rooms are well equipped for demonstration and display purposes. Nothing that would add to attractiveness or to comfort has been omitted.

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Dec 18, 1924

Irving Zuelke - Special Christmas Offer - Appleton Post Crescent WI 13 Dec 1926

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Dec 13, 1926

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What’s For Dinner?

November 22, 2012

Hotel Witter – Demolished in 1950 (South Wood County Historical Museum)

What was served for Thanksgiving Dinner in 1929:

Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin) Nov 26, 1929

Cranberry Jell Easily Made by Newest Recipe

Use of Baking Powder Makes Less Sugar Necessary In Preparation of Sauce

With Thanksgiving close at hand the homemaker is thinking seriously of pumpkin pie and cranberry sauce. A new cranberry recipe made with Rumford all-phosphate baking powder is offered here.

Prepare as usual in proportion of one quart of cranberries to 2 cups water. Cook till berries are tender. If preferred clear, rub through sieve to take out seeds and skins.

Return to the fire adding to every quart of fruit 1 cup of sugar (instead of the usual two cups) and 1 level teaspoon of baking powder. Cook only till the sugar is dissolved. Chill before serving.

This cranberry sauce will be sweet and fresh-flavored with fine, clear color.

Note the great saving in sugar. Also consider the advantages in preparing fruit sauces with a minimum of sugar for invalids and children.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Nov 14, 1932


From the Sheboygan Spirit: This hotel was built in the early 1890s and torn down in 1960.

What The Grand Hotel  served for Thanksgiving in 1946:

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Nov 27, 1946

Deep-Dish Cranberry Pie

3 cups cranberries
1 cup water
1 1/2 cups sugar
3/4 teaspoon salt

Boil the cranberries in the water until they “pop.” Add sugar and salt. Cool somewhat. Pour into a deep pie dish. Cover with a layer of plain pastry, fitting pastry firmly over edge of dish. (The pastry should be slashed to allow escape of steam.) Bake at 450 F. for 15 minutes.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) May 1, 1936

Cold Water Pastry

1 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup lard
4 to 6 tablespoons cold water

Cut lard into flour and salt until the crumbs are the size of dried peas. Add the water slowly, using just enough to make the dough hold together.

Roll on a floured board.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) May 1, 1936

Happy Thanksgiving!

Whittlesey’s Cranberry Marsh

November 21, 2012

The Tribune Rural Editor Visits Whittlesay’s Marsh

BY E.E. SCHROEDER

When one sits down to enjoy his dish of cranberry sauce or slice of cranberry pie at Thanksgiving time he is not reminded of the highly developed agriculture which is needed to produce the popular berry which has become famous along with roast turkey and mincemeat pie.

The writer recently enjoyed dinner at the S.N. Whittlesay cranberry marsh at Cranmoor and later was taken for a trip over the marshes and given an explanation of the methods used to produce high quality berries.

The Whittlesay marsh is among the oldest in Wisconsin and ranks as one of the three largest in the state in acreage and also production, per acre. According to the “History of Wood County” the marsh was started in 1871 when wild berries were first harvested. Later as scientific methods were discovered Mr. Whittlesay was quick to grasp their importance and applied them to his own marshes.

The writer knows little about the culture of cranberries and this story is not intended as a treatise on the subject. It is intended as a story of what he saw and learned in several hours jaunt over the marshes. Much of this may not be news at all to many readers and again some of it may be incorrectly stated. If the latter is true it is unintentional.

To begin with we learned that cranberry marshes must be scalped. That means that the rough surface soil must be removed in order that a level firm seed bed can be secured on which to plant the tame berry. We learned further that certain kinds of fertilizer are needed and provided which makes the berry develop to its fullest. Commercial fertilizers are applied in the middle of June.

It was further learned that the common variety of berry on the average marsh is known as the Bell and Cherry. The Late Howe berry is replacing the former variety as it is firmer and more pleasing in appearance to the purchaser. The Late Howe is an eastern variety and are shipped from the east not as seed but as the young plant which must be transplanted into the fresh, slightly moistened, and well prepared seed bed.

Require Attention

Cranberries require a great deal of attention through the blossoming, ripening and harvesting season. In fact they must be carefully watched the year around. Growing in lowlands means that frosts are more common visitors than to other crops on high ground. Flooding the marshes in the only means of combating this arch enemy of the cranberry grower. This process of flooding at once calls into play a highly developed system of engineering. Huge dependable reservoirs on higher ground than the marshes must be available to provide sufficient water on short notice. Heavy embankments are thrown up around these reservoirs to hold the water in check in flood season and prevent washouts. Gates are installed at the lower levels to control the water supply into the marshes as needed.

The marshes themselves must have ditches into which the water can drain when the danger period is over. These latter ditches must also be well constructed, with gates to hold the water on the marshes until no longer needed.

The Whittlesay marsh has more than a thousand acres within its limits, but a large part of it is used for water control. Harry, a son of S.N. Whittlesay, is in charge and is laying plans to increase the acreage until the marsh ranks as the largest in the west. Formerly connected with the Nekoosa-Edwards paper company, he has turned his energy toward the cranberry “game” and finds it fascinating, judging from his enthusiasm.

The elder Mr. Whittlesay has been in the business for many years and his election to the board of directors of the Wisconsin Cranberry Sales company is a compliment to the membership as well as to him. He has followed the growth of the industry and knows the advantages and shortcomings.

He can tell many interesting incidents of the time before men with rakes took the place of hand pickers. Many men and women were needed in those earlier days. A dance hall was a common part of the equipment on every farm. Every evening the pickers would enjoy themselves to the strains of old fashioned music. Mr. Whittlesay recalls the time when a wooden tramway with trucks carted the berries from the marshes in the Cranmoor district.

During the winter season the cranberry marsh does not present the busy scene common to harvesting time. But there is important work to be done. Many loads of sand are hauled over the surface to add to the porous condition of the soil. A special quality sand can only be used to advantage.

A visit to the packing house on the Whittlesay marsh was also of interest. The latest in grading devices simplified the sorting of pie berries from the others. Fanning mills blow the twigs and leaves and other rubbish from the harvested berries.

Though a story of this kind could be made to include many other interesting features lack of space prevents. A visit to any of the good marshes, of which the Whittlesay marsh is one, impresses the visitor of the extent of the work, the care, the experience and trials involved in successfully catering to the palate of the American consumer for this particular variety of kitchen delicacy.

Mr. Whittlesay ranks high among cranberry growers. His well kept marshes and buildings are ample proof of his success. His son is succeeding him as manager and should meet the continued success which the Whittlesay marshes have enjoyed. The visit to their home and the trip over the marshes will be an event not soon forgotten.

Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin) Feb 15, 1928

Image from CranLib photostream on flickr

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From the History of Wood County by George O. Jones (1923):

HISTORY OF WOOD COUNTY

…In 1855 Abner Whittlesey’and his family came west to Illinois, settling in Galesburg, where Mrs. Whittlesey died. Mr. Whittlesey soon after went to Lockport, Ill., and from there to Berlin, Wis., where he engaged in the cranberry business; this was in the late sixties. In 1870 he came to Wood County, and, together with his son, Sherman Newell Whittlesey, bought six 40-acre tracts of marsh land and established the Whittlesey Marsh, they and Theodore Bearss and Ralph S. Smith being the first cranberry growers in the township. In 1880 ….

…Sherman Newell Whittlesey, subject of this sketch, coming to Illinois with his parents in 1855, was reared in Galesburg and attended the grade schools there and the high school at Lockport, from which latter he was graduated in 1867. He then spent a year in Chicago, and while there took a course in the Chicago Business College, after which he came to Berlin, Wis., and in 1870, with his father bought the 240 acres of marsh land mentioned above and established the Whittlesey Marsh in Wood County, coming here to live in 1871; his first residence in Wood County was in Centralia.

He at once began the raising of cranberries, wild berries being the only ones grown here at that time and his first crop yielding 150 barrels of this variety. As the industry developed he applied scientific methods to the cultivation of his marsh, cutting ditches, scalping the land, and cultivating the berries by the most modern methods available, on which lines he has conducted all his subsequent operations.

From 1878 to 1884 he was engaged in the mercantile business with Frank Garrison at Centralia, under the firm name of Garrison & Whittlesey. In 1884 Mr. Whittlesey and family hired parties to run their marsh while they went to South Dakota. In that state they first took a tree claim of 160 acres, then a preemption claim of 160 acres, and, after proving up on this property, they took a homestead of 160 acres, building up one of the finest farms in Faulk County, S. D. They bought adjoining land until they owned 1,200 acres. At the same time they operated a farm of 320 acres in southeastern Nebraska, which they owned, alternating their residence between the two farms, and thus conducting, with the assistance of hired help, three separate enterprises at the same time, the third being their marsh in Wood County.

In 1892 they returned and took up their residence on the latter property, and here they have since made their home. They have been very successful in the industry and have become very prominent and popular residents of the community. They have increased their holdings to 1,100 acres, 67 acres of which are in cranberry vines. In 1921 they raised and sold 600 barrels of berries, getting as high as $17 per barrel for part of them. The place is well improved and is provided with adequate buildings for care of the crops. Mr. Whittlesey employs several men during the busy season. He has become an expert cultivator and has enjoyed a successful career in every way. He was formerly treasurer of the city of Centralia and of Port Edwards Township, and later of Cranmoor Township.

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Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin) Nov 1, 1945

Cranberrry Contest

November 20, 2012

FIVE WOMEN TO RECEIVE PACK OF CRANBERRIES

FOOD EDITOR ANNOUNCES SIMILAR CONTEST WITH SIMILAR AWARDS FOR NEXT TWO WEEKS; ENTER YOUR RECIPE NOW!

Twenty-five pounds of cranberries, donated by the Wisconsin Cranberry Sales company, will be given to the five prize winners for excellent recipes submitted in The Tribune’s latest food contest. The names of the winners are as follows: Mrs. Leslie Holtz, city, Route 6; Mrs. T.J. Johnson, city, Route 7; Mrs. William Myers, Vesper, Route 1; Mrs. Emmett Knuteson, city, Box 35; Miss Irma Helena Heuer, Pittsville. The prizes will not be available until October 25, when they may be obtained at the Tribune office. Each will receive 5 pounds of berries.

New Contest On

On October 28 we shall again award prizes for exceptional cranberry recipes when similar awards will be made. Here and now is your chance to get a supply of cranberries which will last the ordinary family quite a while. Let us have a banner number of recipes in this contest. What is your favorite cranberry preparation? Send yours and tell your friends to send theirs also. Whatever is worth winning is worth the effort of working for. This requires little effort and the prize is a good one.

The recipes sent in by the various winners are as follows:

Massachusetts Cranberry Pie

Prepare favorite pastry as for pie, and line the pie plate
3 cups cranberries
1/2 cup brown sugar
2/3 cup corn syrup

Put berries through food chopper using coarse knife. Place in plate on top of pastry and add syrup and sugar.

Place in bowl:
5 tablespoons flour
5 tablespoons brown sugar
3 tablespoons butter

Work in mixture with fork until free from lumps and well blended. Spread over the pie filling. Cover with top crust and place in moderate oven, baking from 40 to 45 minutes. All measurements are level.

Irma Helena Heuer.
Pittsville, Wisconsin.

Bananas Baked With Cranberries

Wash one pint cranberries, pour one cupful of boiling water over them. Cook quickly until done and press through a sieve. Peel six large bananas and cut in half lengthwise and crosswise and rub with the juice of half a lemon. In the hot cranberry juice, dissolve 1 1-2 cupfuls of sugar. Pour mixture over bananas and bake in a hot oven until fruit is tender. Remove carefully to a serving dish and chill well. The berry juice forms a rich jelly over the bananas. Serve with or without whipped cream.

Mrs. Emmett Knuteson,
City, Route 7, Box 35.

Cranberry Conserve

4 cups cranberries
1 1-2 cups water
1-2 pound raisins
1-2 pound chopped walnuts
1 orange, juice and chopped rind
3 cups sugar

Cook the cranberries in water until they burst, then rub through a sieve and ad the remaining ingredients. Cook until thick, about 25 minutes.

Pour into hot sterilized jars.

Mrs. William Myers
Vesper, Route 1.

Cranberry Dessert

1 cupful raw cranberries
2 cupfuls sugar
1 cupful apples chopped
1-2 cupful nut meats chopped

Grind cranberries and apples in food chopper. Mix in the sugar and let stand for an hour. Just before serving add nuts and top with whipped cream. This tastes similar to fresh strawberries. A simple dessert.

Mrs. T.J. Johnson,
City, Route 7.

Candied Cranberries

2 cups cranberries
1-2 cup water
2 cups sugar

Pick over cranberries. Prick the skin in several places. Stir sugar and water until dissolved. Boil until thick and syrupy. Add cranberries and cook until mixture shows signs of jellying. Let fruit stand in hot syrup ten minutes. The remove berries and drain on wax paper. These may be served with ice cream or as a garnish for steamed pudding or as any candied fruit.

Mrs. Leslie Holtz,
City, Route 6.

Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin) Oct 14, 1932

Swat the Fly, Wisconsin

June 26, 2012

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 1, 1921

DO IT NOW

by Berton Braley

We must show no ruth or pity
To the fly!
In the country or the city,
He must die!
Do not cherish, do not pet him;
When you see him, go and get him,
Swat him quick and do not let him
Multiply!

Oh, he flits in all the breezes,
Does the fly,
Bringing various diseases;
That is why
We should slay him very quickly
Lest he swarm about us thickly
And we suddenly grow sickly —
And we die!

There’s not one redeeming feature
To the fly;
He’s an evil, loathsome creature,
None deny;
And the only way to treat him
Is to fight him when you meet him —
Smash, abolish, and delete him —
Swat the fly!

He’s a menace — we must pot him,
We must swat and swat and swat him,
While we shout our battle cry,
“Swat the Fly!”

(Copyright, 1921, by The Sheboygan Press.)

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 1, 1921

FLITTING from dish to dish, taking his morning bath in baby’s milk, regaling himself in the butter and preening himself on the sugar bowl, the house fly again is with us. His feet covered with millions of disease germs, he goes on his way leaving death in many forms in his trail. Scientific experiments have shown that musca domestica, the ordinary house fly, is the most industrious and persistent spreader of contagion in the world. Countless thousands have been numbered among his victims and his toll of death among infants is appalling.

War to the death must be waged against this death-dealing insect. No other duty is so important to the housewife as the extermination of the fly. And the task is much easier now than it will be later when the breeding process has multiplied his numbers.

Swat the fly!

On of the most remarkable advances in modern medicine and sanitary science has come from the knowledge of the fact that many of the most murderous diseases of man and animals are caused by the bits of infected blood-sucking insects. The pioneers in this discovery were Theobald Smith and Kilborne, who showed a quarter of a century ago that the deadly Texas fever of cattle was caused by the bite of a fly — the Boophilus bovis, which had become infected by sucking the blood of affected cattle. This great discovery was soon followed by that of the relation of the mosquito to malaria and yellow fever, the relation of the tsetse fly to sleeping sickness and other forms of trypanosomiasis, the relation of the tick to tick fever, of the bug to relapsing fever, of numerous ticks to anaemic diseases in cattle causing vast economic losses.

In temperate climates it would appear that man is largely immune from blood-sucking infected insects. Recently, however, the house fly has been found to be a danger if in a manner somewhat different in so far as it is unable to penetrate the skin owing to the construction of its mouth apparatus. Whatever disease germs it carries it is a passive process, the chief danger being the contamination of foods by bacteria carried on the surface of its body or in its bowels. Of all insects the house fly is the most constant companion of man, tasting his food by day and frequenting his abode by night whether in the far north or the far south, whether on the land or on the steamers that ply on the great oceans. Its very name, Musca domestica, suggests its relation to man.

If the fly were a cleanly insect he might perhaps be tolerated, but from the double life he leads there is no question that he should be exterminated hip and thigh, for he spends half his day in the latrine or manure heap amid the most foul putridity that it is possible to imagine, amid dead, decaying and diseased matter, from which at intervals he comes to bathe in our mild jug or to poise himself on your pat of butter or your meat. Many of his habits have until recently been a riddle but are now becoming understood, and in consequence his presence is as much feared as many of his congeners who have forsaken the dunghill for a meal of good human or animal blood.

All modern experiments concur to show that the principal breeding place of the house fly is the moist, warm manure heap, cesspool, or latrine, although perhaps it must be admitted that some flies are more fastidious. If collections of filth were destroyed the fly plague would be kept largely in abeyance. As things are he can breed in countless numbers and at a great rate.

The evolution of the house fly is complex, for from the moment that the female deposits her eggs in warm purtrefying manure the young go through various stages of development. Within a matter of hours the egg splits and a minute grub creeps out. At the end of twenty-four hours it moults and passes into the second larval stage, which in a day or two moults again and finally becomes a sort of chrysalis. At the end of three or four days of chrysalis life the case opens and the fly emerges to commence its life work. Within ten days or a fortnight it may be sexually mature and commence to lay great batches of eggs. As a rule breeding goes on rapidly between June and October, although under certain circumstances it may go on all the year round. It is a common observation that flies seem to disappear in winter. This must be explained by their ability to hibernate, the first warm day waking them from their slumbers.

It is a fortunate circumstance that they are liable to various forms of destruction, for apart from the magnificent work carried out by the bird, by the spider, and other insects, the fly is subject to devastating diseases, particularly an infective condition set up by a fungus, the Empusa muscae. This plant, in the form of a spore, lights on the surface of the fly and begins to grow, throwing out a slender process which makes its way between the fly’s scales, and thus gains entrance to its body. In the course of a few days the fungus has invaded all its organs and tissues, and now sick unto death the fly may be easily caught or may drop dead where it has alighted.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Apr 21, 1915

As was said above the chief danger of the fly is that it may be a carrier of foul putrefactive or disease germs to articles of diet consumed by man. This is not a figment of the brain of the medical scientist; it is a proved fact. Indeed, long before accurate experiments proved this to be the case it was already supposed that the fly stood in some relation to typhoid fever, especially the typhoid of military stations and camps. There seems to be no doubt that much of the typhoid in the Spanish-American and South African wars were explicable on no other theory. In America this belief became so current that it was spoken of as “the typhoid fly.”

Accurate experiments carried out in this country and elsewhere have demonstrated the disease-carrying propensities of the Musca domestica. Typhoid germs have been recovered from its body days after it was infected. In the case of some germs it has actually been found that where the larva is infected the infection may persist throughout the moultings and be present in the adult or imago stage as late as nineteen days. Not only as a typhoid-carrier, the fly is also believed to carry the disease germs of tuberculosis, cholera, dysentery, and summer diarrhea of children, a disease which sweeps away vast numbers of bottle-fed children in every civilized community at the present day.

The necessity of removing or destroying all putrid organic matter and filth comes home to us when we remember that the fly is capable of long and rapid flights. In actual experiments marked flies were released and were captured half a mile away within forty-five minutes. That flies carry filth on their bodies can be readily shown by taking one from any place and allowing it to walk over the surface of a sterile nutrient jelly. Within a day or two masses of bacteria will have grown wherever its feet have touched. Picture to the mind the gross contamination which will occur when a fly weary with its half-mile flight from a dunghill takes its morning bath in your jug of milk at breakfast. This will bring the problem home to all, and by concerted effort the doom of the house fly will be sealed.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jul 3, 1912

The fly-swatting crusade has been taken up seriously by a number of large cities, either officially or by self-constituted committees of public-spirited citizens. In Cleveland a two-weeks campaign against the fly has just been closed. The warfare was conducted under the direction of a citizens’ committee of fifty-five. A scale of prices was arranged to be regulated by the supply. The market opened at 10 cents a hundred and went down to 10 cents a quart when the swatters got to going right.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jul 8, 1912

The artistic fly swatter was guaranteed a profitable market under this scale of prices, while 10 cents a hundred as the top limit made it impossible for a Napoleon of fly fiances to fill the cold storage warehouse with flies and ever after have champagne for breakfast. As it takes 10,000 flies to make a quart, the price per quart ranged from 10 cents to $10. A similar range in price in stocks within two weeks would set the country by the ears. The Cleveland plan gives the gambler chance enough, and the rights of the consumer and producer are safeguarded.

The Daily Northwestern (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) Sep 27, 1911

Ten cents a quart was the price established in Washington two years ago, but hat was a September price. One female crawling out of a warm corner in the month of April will start a family tree which, without casualties, would have a September membership of about three trillions.

A decrease in the price of flies from $10 a quart, the May figure, to ten cents. the September figure may seem great, but we must remember that the supply may have increased three trillion times.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 3, 1912

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) May 15, 1912

Sign of a Nation, Great and Strong

June 14, 2012

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1947

Our American Flag

Our flag has valor for stripes of red,
A gruesome symbol of the blood shed
To preserve precious freedom of speech,
Right in public assembly to preach.

Pureness of purposes the white shows,
Gives the choice of religion which grows
As we worship in the church we choose,
Nothing that is right do we refuse.

The blue is for courage, loyalty
Of women left behind, royalty
Brave, to whom the war will never end,
Vets’ broken bodies, spirits, they mend.

Stars for states that love, honor, our flag,
A grand symbol, not only a rag,
In service blue ones in windows hung,
Were gold, when taps for heroes was sung.

The American Flag, red, white, blue,
As it waves up high for me or you,
Represents the best of life’s treasure,
Privileges so great none can measure!

(Melitta Foeste King)

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 13, 1959

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1945

Observing Flag Day

Ample opportunity will be afforded Sunday for the public to participate in observance of Flag Day.

The people will be paying homage Sunday for the last time — officially — to the 48-star flag. It is the standard the people have known longest — since Arizona was admitted to the Union in 1912. The 48-star flag will be superseded on July 4 by a new flag recognizing Alaska as the 49th state. The life of the new standard will be brief. On July 4, 1960, it will be replaced by a flag with a 50th star for Hawaii.

Display of the new flag would be improper before Independence Day, but after that day the 48-star emblems will not be discarded. The White House announced early this year that “with limited exceptions, agencies of the federal government will continue to display the 48-star flag so long as it is still in good condition.”

Observance of Flag Day dates back to June 14, 1885, when Dr. Bernard Cigrand, then a 19-year-old teacher at the Stony Hill school near Wauheka and Fredonia in Ozaukee County, had his students write themes on the subject of the American Flag. The next year he proposed that the day be observed nationally. However, it was not until 1916 that President Woodrow Wilson issued an official Flag Day proclamation.

In observing Flag Day, it would be well to note that a number of countries have adopted the Red, White and Blue in tribute to the encouragement given them by the United States in their efforts to gain independence. This is particularly true in regard to the Republics of Liberia, Cuba, Panama, and the Philippines. Each of these independent nations directly owes its existence to the fact hat such a course was fostered by your country. As a result, their flags derive from the Stars and Stripes of the United States.

The refusal of Spain to withdraw troops from Cuba led to occupation of the island by American forces. After the defeat of the Spanish in 1898, American military rule continued only long enough for the Cubans to adopt a constitution and elect their first congress. This congress met for the first time in 1902.

Granting full freedom for the Philippines was more recent. It took two wars to wrest the Filipinos from Spanish and later Japanese rulers. They obtained full freedom in 1946, shortly after World War II, and at a time when the Russian Communists were destroying freedom in such countries as Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Poland, Czechoslovakia, and large parts of the Balkan area.

The red, white and blue flags of these countries provide the answer to the claims of Russian Communists that our country is imperialistic. Further answer is found in this country’s favorable attitude toward efforts of other areas to gain independence.

Thus, in paying tribute to the U.S. Flag tomorrow, we will be recognizing not only the freedoms enjoyed in our country but in other republics as well.
As in previous years, Flag Day ceremonies will be held at the Cigrand memorial in Waubeka early Sunday afternoon and at the restored Stony Hill schoolhouse at 4:30 p.m. Locally, a special Flag Day program has been arranged by the Sheboygan Lodge of the Elks, beginning at 1 p.m. with a motorcade from intersection of 8th Street and Ontario Avenue to the Elks Club at 1943 Erie Ave.

We are also reminded that display of the flag throughout the community will be an important contribution to the observance of Flag Day.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) 13 Jun 1959

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1922

Let’s Read About — Old Glory

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
As often as we can —
It’s fascinating history,
A thrill packed story,
For every American.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
The story of her birth —
Man’s boundless faith
In Men of fate —
Born to glorify the earth.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
And meet those noble souls
Who night and day
Fought all the way . . .
Immortalizing their roles.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
And learn on what blest morn
George told Betsy what to do
With stars and stripes, and know
How our GRAND FLAG was born.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
And the Freedoms she unfurls —
Freeing King and Slave
From a coward’s grave . . .
In both worlds.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
As often as we can —
A blood and thunder history
For Liberty and Democracy,
The glory of every American.

ELIO ORFEO CENCI
April 6, 1948
High Falls, N.Y.

Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York) Apr 16, 1948

About Bernard J. Cigrand:

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1945

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Read more: The National Flag Day Foundation

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Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1947

We are fortunate, indeed!

Wisconsin – A Vote for Our Nation

June 5, 2012

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Nov 6, 1934

THE MAN OF TOMORROW

There’ll be a strong man tomorrow
Fight out there,
Stormed at by sorrow,
Attacked by despair,
Betrayed by the traitors,
Maligned by the haters,
Abused by the greedy,
But loved by the needy
And cheered by the fair.

By Edgar A. Guest

Decatur Review (Decatur, Illinois) Nov 6, 1928

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Nov 6, 1934

DEMOCRACY — VISION OF THE AGES

Man’s soul called out from brutish strength;
Not need of help alone held firm the clan,
But mighty need of brotherhood
Turned fighting creature into thinking man.

And age by age a vision grew,
Held fast, though much submerged by strong decree —
A vision of a brotherhood
So great that little men might all be free.

Man’s life was counted willing gift
When valiant souls but hoped their sons might reap
That brotherhood and love from out
Their sacrifice and hard-held vision deep.

That vision did materialize;
The world has seen its torch give heartening glow.
Free men must strive to hold it high
As symbol of the brotherhood we knew.

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Apr 21, 1942

Salina Journal (Salina, Kansas) Apr 11, 1962

Wisconsin

May 29, 2012

WISCONSIN.

BY A.M. WRIGHT.

Hail Wisconsin! lovely State!
Thou art young, but thou art great;
Mighty waters have thy shore;
Mighty rivers through thee pour;
Rich, exhaustless are thy mines;
Priceless are thy noble pines.

Hail Wisconsin! young and fair!
O! how grand they landscapes are!
Modest plains and groves of trees
Intermixed, the eye to please;
Silver lakes lie ‘mong thy hills;
Through thy vales leap laughing rills.

Hail Wisconsin! who would not
Share the happy Badger’s lot?
Cultivate the fertile soil;
On the fair prairie’s toil;
Sure a hundred fold to reap;
Sure in plenty’s lap to sleep.

Hail Wisconsin! thou hast health;
Hail Wisconsin! thou hast wealth;
Hail Wisconsin! thou hast laws
To protect the poor man’s cause;
Schools to make they children wise —
Who does not Wisconsin prize?

Richland County Observer (Richland Center, Wisconsin) Nov 27, 1855

*****

 Title: A political History of Wisconsin
Author: Alexander McDonald Thomson
Publisher: E.C. Williams, 1900
Page 57 (Google book link)

Spider Webs

March 8, 2012

SPIDER WEBS

Do you remember when we watched a tiny spider
As it spun a dainty cobweb all of gold;
When we marveled at the beauty of weaving
And we wondered how its tiny strands could hold?

Do you recall the intricacy of the pattern
And the iridescent radiance of the hue,
As the sun shone on the wispy lacy meshes
Enhancing unknown dreams for me and you.

How little did we know as we two stood there
That a spider’s thread so fragile, could entwine
The souls of earthly mortals so securely,
That all your dreams are now a part of mine!

— Gladys Ihde, Oshkosh

The Oshkosh Northwestern (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) Mar 14, 1938

*****

According to the 1930 census, Gladys was 23, single and a public school teacher living with her parents in Oshkosh.

A Leap for Life

February 7, 2012

Image from the Wisconsin Historical Society

A Leap for Life.

The Racine, Wis., Journal relates the following incident:

Last Friday afternoon, Chas. Hoyt, an engineer on the Western Union Road, and a friend of his, named Jno. Olin, had an adventure which nearly lost them their lives. They were looking at the break in the bridge over Turtle Creek, which had been caused by the freshet. While standing there, the workmen undertook to move a pile driver. Charley and his friend went to assist them, but while moving, the machine tipped over, and the lower, or upright part, was coming directly where Hoyt and Olin were standing. To retreat was impossible, to stand still was to be crushed, there was only one chance for life, and that was to jump into the water, twenty-five feet below. How slight that chance seemed, as one looked upon that seething, boiling mass of water, filled with great cakes of floating ice, that, as they swept by, were crushed and jammed together. Still it was the only chance.

Hoyt was the first to leap; Olin delayed until near too late. As the latter sprang, he was struck upon the head by the edge of one of the beams, which inflicted a frightful gash. The dark waters closed upon them, and when they arose they were far down the stream, which swept them along with a force irresistible. Then began the terrible struggle for life. Yielding to the current, they endeavored to reach the land further down the stream. Now it seemed as though they were gaining, when they would be swept back into the center of the stream, or struck by the floating ice and driven under water. Thus, for nearly half an hour, did they battle for life, and at last, when nearly exhausted and gone, they managed to get on some floating ice that had been lodged, and over this precarious footing made their way to shore, nearly a mile below the spot where they took their wild leap.

Alton Weekly Telegraph (Alton, Illinois) Apr 26, 1867