Archive for the ‘Genealogy’ Category

Edmund Norman Leslie: Genealogical Maniac

August 24, 2012

Image from Skaneateles: History of its Earliest Settlement and Reminiscences of Later Times -  by Edmund Norman Leslie (HATHI TRUST Digital Library)

COMMITTEE FOR LESLIE

HAD A MANIA FOR LOOKING UP ANCESTRY OF HIS NEIGHBORS.

Skaneateles Man is 92 Years Old and Has an Estate Valued at $100,000 — Petition Filed to Have Him Declared Incompetent.

Edmund Norman Leslie, a well know Skaneateles nonagenarian, is said to have a mania for looking up the genealogical history of his acquaintances. Skaneateles people, as a rule, are proud of their ancestry, therefore, there is nothing significant in proceedings which have been started to have the aged man declared incompetent and a committee appointed to care for his property or person.

Of course, there are some people who send their family skeleton back into its hole the moment any effort is made to bring the bony creature from its closet. Not that it would make any difference, perhaps. A black sheep or two among a long line of ancestors is more the rule than the exception, but there are some who favor not some outsider delving into the family secrets.

Nothing like that in Skaneateles. No objection was made to Mr. Leslie’s publishing a book, which was a historical review of Skaneateles with a sketch of some length of some of the more prominent families. The book was well received and Mr. Leslie was encouraged to continue his research into family histories.

Whatever Mr. Leslie discovered will not reach the public, however, because proceedings have been started to have the aged Skaneateles historian declared incompetent and a petition for the appointment of a committee has been made to County Judge W M. Rose by Attorney Martin F. Dillon of Skaneateles.

Mr. Leslie is 92 years old and has an estate valued at $100,00. He is part owner of the Mansion House at Buffalo. The committee for him has not been named.

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Jul 4, 1908

Skaneateles, May 17. — The last chapter of the old Mansion House in the city of Buffalo was closed last Monday when Martin F. Dillon as executor and trustee under the last will [and testament of Edmund Norman Leslie] conveyed the same to the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad company. For nearly sixty years one half of the same was owned by Edmund Norman Leslie of the village of Skaneateles.

Edmund Norman Leslie was the son of Captain and Mrs. David Leslie. Captain Leslie was born in Scotland in September, 1780, in the parish of Monimail, Fishire. He became a noted ship captain and upon his retirement took up his residence at New Bedford, Mass. He had two children. Henry and Edmund Norman Leslie. Captain Leslie died in New York in 1835.

Edmund Norman Leslie also became a ship master and many time sailed around the  Horn. He retired from business and came to Skaneateles in 1851. He married Millicent A. Coe, who died March 15th, 1890. Mr. Leslie was a sturdy Scotchman and believed in doing right to all his fellowmen. He took a great deal of interest in village affairs and political battles were waged by him. He was president of the village of Skaneateles in 1895 and 1896. He prevented the Skaneateles Water Works company from forcing the sale of its property on the village and in the face of its opposition guided the village while it constructed a new system. During his term of office, he also granted the franchise to the Syracuse & Auburn Electric Railroad company, preparing the franchise himself. He was also identified with the establishing of the Lake View cemetery, the Skateateles Library association and other enterprises identified with the village. He was good to the poor and each year would call upon the coal dealers to ascertain whether or not there were any poor people on their list in need of fuel.

After the death of his wife, Millicent A. Leslie, he acquired an additional interest in the Mansion house in the city of Buffalo. Mr. Leslie died at his home in Genesee street in the village of Skaneateles November 30th, 1908, at the age of 94 years. His only relatives were distant cousins, one of whom married Lieutenant Edward F. Qualtrough; another married Lieutenant Harrison, U.S.A., who at the time of his death had charge of Forrtress Monroe, and another married Lieutenant Mann who was killed in the Indian war.

The history of the same is quite romantic.

Image from The History of Buffalo

History of Mansion House.

In the early “forties” Belah D. Coe owned and operated many mail and stage routes, which terminated in Buffalo. To accommodate his passengers, he built the Mansion house, which contained 285 rooms. It was a brick building and substantially fireproof, the partitions also brick, extending from the cellar to the garret. For many years, it was operated by W.E. Stafford, who became famous as a hotel man, and who went to the Waldorf-Astoria in New York.

Belah D. Coe was a bachelor, and at his death in 1854, by his will, this property went to two nieces and a nephew, being Millicent A. Marshall of Buffalo, Millicent A. Leslie and Edward B. Coe of Skaneateles, and to the heirs of their body. In the event of the death of any of these people with out issue, the share was to be divided between the Buffalo Orphan asylum and the Auburn Theological seminary.

Edward B. Coe left home in 1840. He was declared judicially dead in 1857, and the share of his portion in the Mansion house went to the Buffalo Orphan asylum and to his sister, Millicent A. Leslie, as the Auburn Theological seminary could not, by its charter, take and hold real estate. After the disappearance of Edward B. Coe in 1849, he became a sailor and drifted into South Africa, where he was sold as a slave. His brother-in-law, Edmund Norman Leslie, never believed him dead. He obtained from the Department of State of Washington, the name and location of all the United States consuls and commercial agents in all parts of the world. He had a circular printed in red and black letters offering a reward of $200 for any information of Edward B. Coe, at the same time giving a minute description of his person, particularly that he had his name tatoed on his left arm. These circulars were mailed to every United States consul in all parts of the world.

Edward B. Coe Returns.

In 1891 Edward B. Coe returned and then began the fight to recover the property left him by his uncle’s will. During the argument in court, the presiding judge intimated that, having been declared judicially dead, he had no standing in court, to which his counsel, the late William H. Seward, replied: “If such a decision is to be law in this case, Edward B. Coe, who is sitting here in the presence of this court, can go into the street and commit murder and you cannot punish him, because he has been declared judicially dead.” This argument restored the property to Edward B. Coe. He lived here for several years, but meeting business reverses, he mortgaged his property to the late Charles Pardee, who afterward acquired the same by mortgage foreclosure. IN 1875 Charles Pardee committed suicide, and this property went by his will to his daughter, Mary E. Moses.

Edward B. Coe left Skaneateles for Philadelphia at which time the steamer “Queen of the Pacific” was about to leave for San Fransisco by the way of Cape Horn. After a voyage of about six weeks he reached San Francisco. The “Queen” then commenced regular trips from San Francisco to Portland, Oregon, carrying freight and passengers. He remained on this vessel until September 5th, 1883, at which time he became despondent and fastening a large heavy lantern to his arm jumped overboard and wen to the bottom of the Pacific ocean.

About that time the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad company acquired a portion of the property by condemnation, and the award was paid in court, upon the application to withdraw the same, by Millie Coe, the daughter of Edward B. Coe, then a girl 17 years of age. This indeed was a battle royal. The question raised was that she had an estate tail in this property, and her father, not having the title in fee simple, could not deprive her of it. The opposition contended that the statue of 1786 eliminated the estate tail in this country.

The legal giants of that time were employed on either side, Benoni Lee of Skaneateles, L.R. Morgan of Syracuse, P.R. Cox of Auburn, Spencer Clinton and Charles D. Marshall of Buffalo.

The court finally held that Miss Coe had no interest in the property. A short time after this decision, Edmund Norman Leslie acquired that interest and held the same at the time of his death in his ninety-fourth year. By his will, he devised the same in trust to Martin F. Dillon of Skaneateles, who has for two months been engaged in perfecting the title, and the deed was finally delivered last Monday.

The New York Central & Hudson River Railroad company will tear down the old structure and use the land for a new $10,000,000 terminal. This will be the end of an old landmark, which had stood for nearly three-quarters of a century, during which time guests from all nations of the world have been entertained.

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) May 18, 1913

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Jun 18, 1913

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York)  Dec 28, 1914

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Apr 14, 1916

*  *  *  *  *

An excerpt from a bio of the “genealogical maniac” posted on an Ancestry.com message board:

Upon his removal to Skaneateles the want of active employment induced him to take up the subject of the early history of the town and village. He obtained two ledgers which had been kept by early merchants of 1805 and 1815 respectively, and from them secured the names of nearly all the earliest settlers, especially those who made their purchases here. He collected and preserved some very valuable historical matter concerning the locality, which was first published in a series of papers in the Democrat, afterward copied in the Free Press, and later printed in book form by Charles P. Cornell, of Auburn, N. Y.

Mr. Leslie furnished entirely from his own collections the only complete list of the names of 364 union volunteers who enlisted from the town of Skaneateles, or enlisted elsewhere, but belonged to this town, giving rank, company, and regiment, in alphabetical order, which list was published in the Free Press. He has also collected some of the most valuable files of original local newspapers, had them bound in volumes, and presented them to the Skaneateles Library Association for preservation. He has erected a beautiful memorial tablet in St. Jame’s church in memory of the sons of that church who lost their lives in defense of the Union. He has also published several series of the lives of early prominent residents of the town, notably of Lydia P. Mott, a prominent promoter of female education, who established ‘The Friend’s Female Boarding School,” which was known as “The Hive.” Many of the ladies of Auburn and surrounding country were educated at this school, which was discontinued about seventy years ago. Mr. Leslie’s labor is of a character that will survive and perpetuate his memory to coming generations. All of his valuable historical work has been done gratuitously.

You Can’t Forget a Garden, But Can You Forget a Poet?

July 1, 2012

Image from Alfredo Rodriguez

YOU CAN’T FORGET A GARDEN

You can’t forget a garden
When you have planted a seed –
When you have watched the weather
And know a rose’s need.
When you go away from it,
However long or far,
You leave your heart behind you
Where roots and tendrils are.

Louise Driscoll, in “Garden Grace.”

Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jun 11, 1932

Louise Driscoll To Speak at Normandie

Garden lovers will have an opportunity to indulge themselves, in imagination, in the delights of their hobby, despite Winter’s barricade against outdoor participation, when Louise Driscoll speaks on Thursday, February 20, in the ballroom of the Normandie, No. 253 Alexander Street.

Miss Driscoll will have as her theme that evening “A Garden Thru the Year.” Author of “Garden Grace” and “Garden of the West,” she will bring the spirit of all gardens to her listeners, as in her poem, “Lost Garden,” from “Garden Grace.”

Guest of Mrs. Forbes

Miss Driscoll will be the guest of Mrs. George M. Forbes of Alexander Street, president of the Rochester Poetry Society, under whose auspices she will speak.

Rochester Journal (Rochester, New York) Feb 13, 1936

ON BEING A NEWSMAN IN PASADENA

I have long said one of the delightful aspects of being a newsman in Pasadena is that — no matter on what subject you write — you may rest assured that among the thousands of persons reading your stuff will be at least one of the world’s greatest authorities on that subject.

It never fails.

Some of the most valued acquaintances I have picked up over the years have developed this way. You do a “masterpiece.” Next day the phone rings, or there’s a letter on your desk. You were right, and you know it. Or you were wrong, and you’ve picked up a world of understanding.

*          *          *

On my desk this morning was a letter of a different type — illustrating the point I am making in another way.

It was in response to a column I wrote way last spring, forgot, and then published late because I still thought it was a good column. I called it, IN WHICH I GROW SENTIMENTAL. It was built around re-discovery of this poem, which, half forgotten from my boyhood days, nonetheless had carried me through many tight places.

Here’s the letter I found on my desk.

L.M. — I was very much interested and pleased to see, in your column, a quotation from a poem by Louise Driscoll.

Louise — who died some years ago — way my cousin.

She was for many years, head of the library of Catskill, New York, and was a poet of quite considerable reputation. In the days when poetry, to be publishable, did not have to be (a) an imitation of the New Yorker, or (b) something just long enough to fill that annoying gap at the end of a magazine page.

Her poems were published in many magazines in the 1920s and thereabouts, and appear in several anthologies. She published one book of collected verse, so far as I know; a small book of very charming and rather haunting poems, under the title “Garden Grace.”

I am sure it would have made her very happy to know that one of her poems was remembered.

Very sincerely,

Marjorie C. Driscoll,

Altadena.

See what I mean about the delightful aspects of being a newsman in Pasadena?

*          *          *

SENTIMENT HAS A PLACE IN OUR BEING

Star-News (Pasadena, California) Jun 9, 1959

 

Distinction for Local Women

New York, Sept. 26 (Special). –

Three Kingston women, seven residents of Woodstock, one Palenville and one Catskill woman are members of a group of outstanding women of the nation selected for inclusion in “American Women,” a who’s who of the feminine world just completed and published.

The honor was attained locally by Mary E.S. Fischer, illustrator, Melvina E. Moore-Parsons, and the late Mary Gage-Day, physicians of Kingston, Mrs. J. Courtenay Anderson, Agnes M. Daulton, Harriet Gaylord and Louise S. Hasbrouck, writers, Nancy Schoonmaker, lecturer, Lily Strickland, composer, and Mrs. Bruno L. Zimm of Woodstock, Jennie Brownscombe, artist, of Palenville, and Louise Driscoll, librarian, of Catskill.

New York state has contributed 1,096 of the 6,214 women chosen for the distinction of places on the list. Eighty-two per cent attended college and the majority are active in clubs and organizations. The possibility of success for a career and marriage combination receives strong endorsement from the fact that 41 per cent of the roster are married.

Approximately a third of the list, in true feminine fashion, declined to state their age. Writers formed the largest class, numbering 800, and professors the second with 355. Four each are engaged in aviation and astronomy, five in engineering and thirteen in the ministry. Gardening is the most popular hobby. Only sixty-four like to play bridge and one goes in for hunting mushrooms.

Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York) Sep 27, 1935

Louise won an award for this one:

Title: Poems of the Great War
Editor: John William Cunliffe
Publisher: The Macmillan Company, 1917
“The Metal Checks”
Pages 78-83

Her Father:

Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York) Jan 3, 1941

Services Tonight For Mr. Driscoll, Dean of Masons
—–
Native of Rockland County, 103, Died Yesterday in Catskill
—–

CATSKILL — Masonic services will be held tonight for John Leonard Driscoll, a native of Piermont, Rockland County, and oldest Mason in the state, who died yesterday at his home. Mr. Driscoll, who had been in remarkable good health until two weeks ago, was 103 years old last October eleventh.

Mr. Driscoll was a descendant of Johannes ver Vailen, one of the holders of the Harlem Patent who had an inn and a ferry at Spuyten Duyvil in the early days of the state. His father was Isaac Driscoll and his mother Eliza Burgess Shaw. His great-grandfather came to the United States from Ireland about the middle of the Eighteenth Century.

Surviving Mr. Driscoll, who had lived under twenty-five of the nation’s thirty-two presidents, are the Misses Lizbeth, Caroline and Louise Driscoll, all at home.

As a boy Mr. Driscoll witnessed the digging of holes and the planting of rails for the Hudson River Railroad. Until the age of sixty he had never smoked. He first tried a cigar, without becoming sick, and then changed to a pipe which was his favorite and constant companion during the last few years of his life.

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Sep 30, 1937

At the age of 100, referring to his job in the 1830′s when pine logs were used for fuel and he was chief engineer for the Catskill Mountain Railroad, he said, “A good fireman in those days would handle the wood only once. He pitched each chunk at such an angle that when it landed on the floor of the engine it would bounce through the fire door into the box.”

He explained his philosophy of life, take it as it comes, by saying:

“When you’ve lived as long as I have, and seen many things, you realize there are few things in the world worth worrying about. It’s a good world, too, as long as people keep their sense of humor.”

Middletown Times Herald (Middletown, New York) Jan 3, 1941

* Another obituary states his wife died in 1903. (See end of post for image.)

* I couldn’t find obituaries for Louise or her sisters. It is possible there were some in the Greene County Examiner-Recorder, but I don’t have access to the years they would have appeared. A shame, really; Louise was a very talented lady and I would like to know more about her.

Quilt square sewn by Louise Driscoll’s grandmother:

From Dutch Door Genealogy:

18. E.B. Driscoll, age 47
She was Eliza Burgess Shaw, mother of Carrie, above, and in 1862 was the widow of Isaac Blauvelt Driscoll (#6010) in 1836. Isaac died in 1851. Their children who lived were John Leonard Driscoll, born 1837, lived to be 103; Charles Francis, born 1841; and Caroline, born 1844. Eliza was a seamstress, per the 1860 census.

Read more about the quilt at the link.

This is the closest I could come to finding a biography, other than the short bit I linked at the top of the post:

Louise Driscoll, who had a story, “The Tug of War,” in Smith’s Magazine for May, and a novelette, “The Point of View,” in the June number of the same magazine, lives in Catskill, N.Y. She has written verse since she was a very little girl, and while still a schoolgirl used occasionally to send poems to the New York newspapers and different magazines, many of them being accepted. It is only within the last few months that she has tried to do much prose, and she says that she has found the editors of the American magazines so ready to receive and educate a new writer that she has no faith in the tales so often heard concerning the necessity of influence to gain attention. Her verses have appeared in Lippincott’s, the Critic — now Putnam’s Monthly — the Independent, the Metropolitan, and a number of other periodicals, and some of them have been widely copied. One poem, “The Highway,” which appeared in Lippincott’s about three years ago, brought her a good many letters from readers, including some editors of other magazines. Miss Driscoll in now at work on a longer and more serious book than “The Point of View,” which is her first long story. She is very ambitious and believes fully in hard work, but she says she writes because she must, and is sure she would write if she had never heard of type. Incidentally, she has a large regard for the English language, and a sincere desire to use it correctly.

The Writer, Volume 19
By William Henry Hills, Robert Luce, 1907

Another garden themed poem by Louise Driscoll:

Olean Evening Times (Olean, New York) Nov 17, 1924

One of Louise Driscoll’s books can be accessed for free at Google Books:

Title: The Garden of the West
Author: Louise Driscoll
Publisher: The Macmillan company, 1922

From Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine – 1907

THE POOR HOUSE

by Louise Driscoll

There’s a white road lined with poplars
And the blue hills rise behind,
The fields lie green on either side
And the overseer’s kind.

This is a play/skit:

Title: The Drama Magazine – Volume 7
Author: Drama League of America
Editors: Charles Hubbard Sergel, William Norman Guthrie, Theodore Ballou Hinckley
Publisher: Drama League of America, 1917
Pages 448-460

This description from The Quarterly Journal of Speech Education – 1918:

One act tragedy for two men and two women. Realistic play of American rural life and the tragedy of weakness and lack of determination.

She also wrote and/or translated music lyrics. I ran across a Christmas carol she did as well:

Polska
Metsän puita tuuli tuudittaa,
ja joka lehti liikkuu,
oksat keinuu, kiikkuu,
karjan kellot kilvan kalkuttaa
ja linnut livertävät
la la la la la la.
Niinpä neidon mieli nuor eli’ ijällä
lentää kuin lehti ilman tiellä
Näin iloiten vain ma laulelen
la la la la la la la la la la la la.
Karjan kellot kilvan kaikottaa
ja linnut livertävät
la la la la la la.

Sunnuntaina taasen kiikuttaa
pojat iloissansa
kukin neitojansa.
Korkealle keinu heilahtaa
ja tytöt laulelevat
la la la la la la.
Niinpä neidon mieli nuorell’ ijällä
lentää kuin lehti ilman tiellä.
Näin iloiten vaan ma laulelen
la la la la la la la la la la la la.
Korkealle keinu heilahtaa
ja tytöt laulelevat
la la la la la la.

*****

Polka

In the woods the trees, the trees are gay.
See how the branches lightly swing and sway, swing and sway.
Sheep bells tinkle and sweet birds sing,
So sing the maidens, tra la, la,la, la,la.
Shaken like a leaf when winds are blowing,
Is a girl’s heart when the rose is showing.
Tra la, la tra la,la, when high flies the swing,
Tra la, la,la,la.la,la,la,la,la,la,la,la.
Her heart goes there like the swing in air,
And falls while she is singing_Tra la, la,la,la,la.

English version by
Louise Driscoll.

Title: Folk Songs of Many Peoples, Volume 1
Editor: Florence Hudson Botsford
Publisher: Womans Press, 1921
Page 26

*     *     *     *     *

Greene County Examiner-Recorder (Catskill, New York) Jan 9, 1941

It’s Here! The 1940 Federal Census

April 2, 2012

Image from Forrest Stuart MacCormack Photography

The 1940 Federal census is more than 40 per cent complete in Fayette and Somerset counties, according to Ralph C. Kennedy, district census supervisor, with headquarters in the National Bank & Trust Company building at Brimstone Corner.

“From all indications, the census should be completed in Connellsville next week but the work in the rural areas will not be completed until the end of the month,” he said.

Although complete returns have not been tabulated, a hurried examination of the records reveal that approximately 125,000 persons have already been tabulated in the two counties, the supervisor declared, with Fayette county having nearly 95,000 in that total.

“It appears that the enumerators are averaging about 10,000 persons a day, which is quite a job. This figure, however, is certain to go down when the canvassers strike the less populous districts. A continuation of the fine cooperation the workers have been receiving will east the big job before them. In many cases, re-calls may be avoided if the head of the household will leave necessary information at home to pass on to the enumerator,” Mr. Kennedy said.

He added that regardless of where a person may live, he or she will be enumerated during the decennial canvass. Persons who were living as of 11:59 P.M. Sunday night, March 31, are included although they may have died since that time. Births after that hour, however, are not to be tabulated in the 1940 census.

Mr. Kennedy pointed out the enumerators expect to find quite a few persons in Fayette and Somerset counties living in coke ovens, caves, piano boxes, garages and other places but all of these are to be embraced in the tabulation.

The Daily Courier (Connellsville, Pennsylvania) Apr 13, 1940

There were 575,250 unemployed persons in Pennsylvania during the final week of March, 1940, according to U.S. census figures recently released. This represented about 14 per cent of the State’s available labor, compared to a 9.7 percentage in the Nation as a whole. Since March the total of unemployed has shown a considerable decline in Pennsylvania.

The Daily Courier (Connellsville, Pennsylvania) Feb 1, 1941

*****

The 1940 Federal Census is ONLINE (not indexed) as of today. Use a 1940 house address to help locate family members etc. (Thanks to Steve Morse for creating the ED finder.)

Lewis W. Homan, an Early Iowa Pioneer

December 16, 2011

OUR NONAGENARIANS

Short Sketch of Adams County Citizens of Advanced Age.

LEWIS W. HOMAN, MT. ETNA.

One of the Early Pioneers in Iowa, an Ex-County Judge and an Exemplary Citizen.

Lewis W. Homan, the subject of this sketch, was born January 26, 1818, and is now 91 years old. His father and mother were citizens of Virginia at the time of their marriage, in 1816, but soon after moved into Kentucky. Mark Homan, father of Lewis W., was born in Virginia near the Potomac river, about 40 miles above the city of Washington, in the year 1789, the year that George Washington was first elected president. When Mark Homan was 13 years old he moved with his mother to what is now West Virginia, where he lived until he attained the age of 27 years, and where he met and married Miss Nancy Burson, in 1816. Soon after their marriage they moved across the Cumberland mountains into Kentucky, crossing the mountains on horseback. In 1818 their son, Lewis W., whose picture we this week present to our readers, was born, on the banks of Salt river, in Kentucky. When Lewis was about eight years old his grandmother, Elizabeth Homan, entered land in Putnam county, Indiana, which she deeded to her son Mark, and to which Lewis W. came with his father and mother in the fall of 1827, and where his father made his home until the time of his death in 1874, the mother dying in 1837. Here Lewis grew to manhood and in 1838 was married to Miss Temperance M. McClain.

Image from Legends of America

In 1843 with his wife and three children he moved to Jones county, Iowa, coming through from Indiana with an ox team and in the old fashioned prairie schooner. Jones county was then mostly unfenced, raw prairie, and its county seat was but a very small village. However, its people were open hearted and kind to all newcomers, and the family was soon among kind and sociable friends. They resided in Jones county until the year 1856, when they came to Adams county, where they again went through the experiences of making a home on the frontier of a new country. It was not long, however, until they were surrounded with friends and helpful neighbors, and the exemplary life of the old gentleman has retained the respect and esteem of all his acquaintances down through the years. Mr. Homan was married but once, his wife living with him to old age. At the time of her death, about eight years ago, they had been living together 63 years. On the occasion of their fifty-seventh wedding anniversary a large number of their relatives and friends met to assist in celebrating the event. Mr. and Mrs. Homan were the parents of 12 children and number among their progeny 51 grandchildren, most of whom are living, and 44 great grandchildren, a record that scarcely finds an equal in Adams county.

Lewis Homan and wife passed a few years in Corning, the rest of their lives they spent on the farm, where they raised their large family. Under the old law, Mr. Homan served a term as county judge of Adams county, and thus it will be seen that his friends and neighbors delighted to honor him with a high position in their midst. He and his brother Westley were the founders of the First Baptist church of Adams county, which was organized in 1858, and of which he is the only charter member. It stands as a splendid monument to his religious zeal and fidelity in days when the support of a church meant more than it does now, from a financial standpoint at least. After the organization of this church he was made superintendent of its Sunday school, a position he held for 17 years, and until old age forbade he was one of the deacons of the church. He and his wife early in life identified themselves with church and Sunday school work, also with the cause of temperance. In an early day, while still living in Jones county, they signed a pledge of total abstinence from intoxicants, and faithfully adhered to it all their lives. Mr. Homan is now living in the joy of a well spent life, and the hope of a glorious eternity. Time has been good to Mr. Homan, and left him the use of a sound mind, and some degree of health. He has a good appetite for food and enjoys the eating, but has not strength enough in his limbs to walk, and is unable to leave his room. He generally sleeps well and sits in his rocker most of the day. He is cheerful with the friends who call to see him, and greatly enjoys their visits.

Mark Homan, father of the subject of this article, was a soldier of the war of 1812, and Lewis W. had two sons in the military service of the United States in the war for the preservation of the union.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) apr 7, 1909

Pedigree Was Fine, But….

November 2, 2011

Pedigree Was Fine, But —,

Though nepotism has been known to get good railroad jobs for young men, there is one passenger official in Kansas City with whom family connections do not go very far.

A few days ago the official in question was in quest of an additional man for his office.

A friend, learning of his desire, took occasion to write a letter indorsing a young man of his acquaintance.

The letter contained some glowing testimonials of some of the things accomplished by the young man’s ancestors and relatives. But it didn’t get very far with the passenger official, when sent the following laconic reply to the young man’s indorser:

“Judging from your letter, the young man you recommend must have a good pedigree. However, I merely desire a clerk now, but if I conclude to start a stock farm later, I will let you know and will be glad to give the young man a chance.”

– Kansas City Journal.

The Gettysburg Times (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Jun 17, 1912

Marshall Wright: Aged War Veteran Tells of Experience

November 12, 2010

140th Pennsylvania - Officers

Image from the History of Co. K,  140th Penna Volunteers – 1862 – “65

Aged War Veteran Tells Of Experience

Marshall Wright, 85 years of age, of Croton avenue, clear of vision and mind, and still able to go about without a staff tells of his early days in the Panhandle of West Virginia, relates thrilling experiences of how he suffered for the flag and endured hardness for his country. The whole story is an inspiration to the faltering ones of today, who are losing their nerve.

“I was born in “old Virginny” September 10, 1837, on a large 400-acre Brooke’s county farm, just across the Ohio river from Steubenville, O. Brooke county has always been in that narrow strip of land called the Panhandle lying between the state of Pennsylvania and the Ohio river. Up to 1861 it was a part of Virginia; but when Virginia seceded from the Union, representatives from 47 counties of the northwestern part of the state organized a state government, and in 1863 were admitted to the Union as West Virginia. That part of the country was a hotbed of secession. Families were arrayed against each other, friend was against friend. Seven of my schoolmates favored the southern cause.

“My father was Jacob Wright and my mother was Margaret Davis Wright. There were 11 of we children. We did not have free schools but the parents paid tuition of abut $2 for each child for a term of three months a year.

Lived In Log House

“When I was 12 years old I was doing all kinds of farm work and working the same number of hours as father. We lived in a log house. I can still see the big fireplace, the spinning wheel, the long barreled rifle on pegs above the mantle, the flickering tallow candle or the piece of wicking burning on the edge of a saucer of grease. Then that gun. The barrel was as heavy as a crow bar, but oh boy, how it would shoot. One day father gave me a dozen lead bullets as I was preparing to go hunting with the old relic on the pegs. I came back with 13 squirrels. The thirteenth squirrel was killed with the ‘neck’ cut from one of the bullets, which had adhered when taking from the moulds. In those early days the wild ducks and geese flying to or from their winter home in the south would sometimes hand and occupy the river. There would be thousands of them in the river at one time. In the winter when the farm work was all done up, I would make trips down the Ohio and Mississippi to New Orleans on a flat boat. I usually went with Bill Householder who was a regular at that kind of seafaring, and had just completed my third trip when the was came on. I was 24 years old and the first act of the seceders was to go down along the Baltimore & Ohio as far as Grafton and burn buildings and bridges. I joined the three-month men as a private in the First Virginia regiment and when we overtook the bridge burners at Phillippi and shelled them, there was nothing further to it. We were paid $11 a month in gold and at the expiration of the term were mustered out at Wheeling.

In 140th Pa. Volunteers

“I then enlisted in Company K, 140th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry for three years. My captain was William Stockton of Cross Creek and the colonel was Dick Roberts of Beaver, Pa. We assembled and organized at Washington’s fair grounds. Then went to Camp Copeland, Pittsburgh, then moved to Harrisburg where we were equipped and sent out to patrol the Northern Central railway, now the P.R.R., to Parkton, Md. On December 1, 1862, we joined the Army of the Potomac. Our first fight was at Chancellorsville where the famous General Stonewall Jackson was killed. We were defeated, and re-crossed the Rappahannock to go into camp. Next, we followed Lee’s army which was invading Pennsylvania. Our regiment arrived at Gettysburg about 9o’clock on the morning of July 2 and took a position in the famous wheatfield. Our losses were very heavy and among the slain was Colonel Roberts. I was struck on the right elbow and had to retire. Later I was sent to Satterlee hospital, West Philadelphia. My father came and took me home. At the expiration of my furlough I went to the detention camp at Alexandria, Va., and a little later on was given full equipment including a gun and 40 rounds of ammunition, and with others boarded a supply train on the Orange and Alexandria railroad to rejoin the regiment, which was in camp, in the county of Culpeper. That was as rough a road as a man ever rode on! It now appears to me that the engine bell never stopped ringing owing to the low joints. It’s a wonder the water did not splash out of the boiler.
At Cancellorsville.

“General Grant now had charge of the army of the Potomac and great activity was going on at every point. Our regiment crossed the Rapidan and slept on the Chancellorsville battlefield. On May 4th, 1864, we went into the battle of the Wilderness and got into action on the second day, just before sundown, at Todd’s Tavern, where Corporal Wright, that’s me, had one bullet put thru the sleeve of his blouse and another right through his cap. Well, they say “a miss is as good as a mile.” We next crossed the Mataponny river in the night. At daybreak a large force of Confederates came out and formed as if to go into battle. We fired one volley into them and they disappeared, while we fell back across the little stream. Spottsylvania came next where Lee had his army behind earthworks. Our regiment was marching in the night to the immediate vicinity of the works. It has been said that we were twenty men deep on the assaulting line. We knew something was going to happen. It rained all night. Just as the first streaks of dawn lifted the darkness of the night the order to charge rang all along the line. The fight was on. The noise of that battle was awful. I was in the first line and went over the top twenty or thirty feet, when a bullet struck me in the neck, passed clear through and came out of my back. We took several thousand prisoners. My injury was of such a nature that I was paralyzed. The battle was at its height and the captured ‘rebs’ were pouring back to our lines and eager they were to get back to a place of safety. As one of them came close to me I held out my hands, and asked him if he wouldn’t take me back. He stopped and helped me to our side of the works and laid me down where the flying bullets would not be so liable to get me, then beat it back into our lines as fast as he could travel.

That was on May 12th. They carried me back to the field hospital with other wounded. The tide of battle changed and the field hospital was left unguarded. The ‘rebs’ came that way and while they wanted nothing to do with anything that looked like I did, they took my boots and every bit of my clothing except my underwear. This little scene had hardly been staged when Sheridan’s cavalry came down and took care of us. I was loaded into an ambulance with another wounded soldier and for 36 hours was bumped and jolted over rough country roads, many miles of the way being corduroy.

Suffer Intensely.

The ride was worse than death. We both suffered intensely. Upon arrival at Acquai creek we were placed on straw or hay that had been scattered on the ground and when the hospital boat arrived we were loaded onto the boat, and put onto cots that seemed so nice and soft to anything we had thus far. Up to this time nothing had been done for me. Not a drop of medicine, nothing to ease the pain, had not been bathed or had my wound dressed. There were 1500 [or 1600] of us in that cargo bearing every conceivable kind of an injury. One of the attendants came to me and said: “Open your mouth.” I did so and he said: “drink all you can,” as he put a bottle to my lips. I immediately went to sleep and when I awoke it was in the Harvard Hospital, Washington, D.C. It had been five days since I was hurt and the only thing that had been done was to give me that medicine out of the bottle.”

Stopping as if to collect his thoughts this old veteran said, “What makes us old Grand Army men love the flag so much is, that we have suffered so much for it and it has done so much for us.” “My wound was an unusual one owing to the way it cut a pathway thru my neck among the arteries and cleared itself without striking a vital spot. The surgeons took a photograph of it. My left arm was paralyzed by the wound. At the end of thirty days my mother went to Washington and took me home on furlough.

After six months treatment at the Penn Hospital, Pittsburgh, I was sent back to the regiment which was lying in front of Petersburg. In November 1864, After the final withdrawal from Richmond, the army followed Lee with the 140th Regiment deployed as skirmishers. We overtook them at Appomattox and the surrender followed, April 9th, 1865. I was in the Grand Review at Washington in May, then we proceeded to Pittsburgh turned in our guns and equipment and were mustered out of the service.

I went back to farming and 12 years ago came to New Castle to make my home. In 1880 Miss Margaret Pollock became my wife.

We have two daughters, Mrs. Geo. Richardson of Main street and Mrs. J.H. Fulton of Los Angeles, Calif.

We live in the Dufford Block, Croton avenue.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) 2 Dec 1922

New Castle News (New Castle,  Pennsylvania) Mar 3,  1911

Oak Park Cemetery (Image from Find-A-Grave)

D. Marshall Wright.

D. Marshall Wright, aged 86 years, of 337 1-2 Croton avenue, one of the oldest residents of New Castle and veteran of the Civil War, died Saturday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. George Richardson of 601 East Main street after a brief Illness of pneumonia.

Mr. Wright was born in Virginia, September 10, 1837, and had resided in this city for the past 14 years. He was a member of Epworth Methodist church, G.A.R. and I.O.O.F. lodge.

He enlisted at the beginning of the Civil War in Washington county in the Union Army with Company K, 140th Pennsylvania Volunteers and served for four years.

Besides hsi widow, Mrs. Margaret Wright, he leaves two daughters, Mrs. J.H. Fulton of California, and Mrs. George Richardson of this city, and three sisters, Mrs. Thomas Wheeler and Mrs. Alex Ralston of West Virginia, and Mrs. Wesley Crawford, of Brazil, Ind.

Funeral services took place this afternoon at 2:30 from the Richardson home on Main street in charge of Rev. Homer Davis assisted by Rev. C.M. Small. Interment was made in Oak Park Mausoleum.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Feb 11, 1924

Name:      Marshall Wright
Enlistment Date:     9 Apr 1862
Rank at enlistment:     Corporal
State Served:     Pennsylvania
Was Wounded?:     Yes
Survived the War?:     Yes
Service Record:     Enlisted in on 18 May 1861.
Mustered out on 28 Aug 1861.
Enlisted in Company K, Pennsylvania 140th Infantry Regiment on 04 Sep 1862.
Mustered out on 31 May 1865 at Washington, DC.
Sources:     History of Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1861-1865
Research by R. Ross Houston

Marshall Wright‘s daughter, Hattie L. Wright married James Hunter Fulton. They has a son, H. Marshall Fulton:

Name:   Hattie L Fulton
[Hattie L Wright]
Birth Date: 12 Jul 1873
Birthplace: West Virginia
Death Date: 21 Dec 1941
Death Place: Los Angeles
Mother’s Maiden Name: Pollock
Father’s Surname: Wright

Name:  Hattie Fulton
Home in 1900: Ellwood City, Lawrence, Pennsylvania
Age: 26
Birth Date: Jul 1873
Birthplace: West Virginia
Race: White
Gender: Female
Relationship to Head of House: Wife
Father’s Birthplace: West Virginia
Mother’s Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Mother: number of living children: 1
Mother: How many children: 1
Spouse’s name:     James H Fulton
Marriage Year: 1893
Marital Status: Married
Years Married:     7
Household Members:
Name     Age
James H Fulton 30 Jul 1869 PA PA PA
Hattie Fulton 26
Marshall Fulton 5 Jun 1894 PA PA WV

Name:  Hattie L Fulton
Age in 1910: 36
Estimated birth year: abt 1874
Birthplace: West Virginia
Relation to Head of House: Wife
Father’s Birth Place: Virginia
Mother’s Birth Place: Pennsylvania
Spouse’s name: James H Fulton
Home in 1910: New Castle Ward 3, Lawrence, Pennsylvania
Marital Status: Married
Race: White
Gender: Female
Household Members:
Name     Age
James H Fulton     40
Hattie L Fulton 36
H Marshall Fulton 15

Name: H Marshall Fulton
Home in 1930: Alhambra, Los Angeles, California
Age: 35
Estimated birth year: abt 1895
Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Relation to Head of House: Head
Spouse’s name: Hazel L Fulton
Household Members:
Name     Age
H Marshall Fulton 35 (machinist – can factory)
Hazel L Fulton 33 UT ENG SWE
Jack Fulton 10

Jack Fulton

As I was doing some research on Marshall Wright, I ran across this obituary for his great-grandson, who coincidentally passed away this year.

Jack Marshall Fulton 06/02/1919 ~ 03/28/2010

ESCONDIDO — Jack Marshall  Fulton  was born June 2, 1919 in Ogden, Utah, the son of Hazel and Marshall  Fulton. He passed away peacefully on Sunday, March 28, 2010. Jack graduated from Alhambra High School, Alhambra, Calif. He served in the Army Air Corps during WWII. After being discharged, he returned to school graduating from Pierce College and then the Agricultural Teacher Program at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo where he received his Bachelors and Masters of Ed.

He began his teaching career at Escondido High School in 1957 and served until he retired in 1980. He then married the love of his life, Martha Moen on January 15, 1983 and enjoyed 14 years of marriage that included many travels and cruises. Jack became a Master Mason in 1949. He served his community with the Masons and also the Lions Club throughout his life. He leaves his loving family, Cary and Cheryl Moen, Norman and Carol Peet; and grandchildren, Dana and Wendy Moen, Deric and Amber Moen, Darin Moen, Andrew and Erin Peet, Aaron and Amanda Peet, Josh and April Peet; and five great grandchildren with one on the way!

You are invited to the memorial service on Wednesday, April 21, 2010, at 2 p.m., at the Masonic Center, 1331 S. Escondido Blvd., Escondido, CA 92025, 760-745-4957. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests donations be given to Elizabeth Hospice, http://www.elizabethhospice.org.

obits.nctimes.com

Old Bucktails Answer the Final Roll Call

November 11, 2010

Alanson E. Niles

DEATH OF COLONEL ALANSON E NILES

SKETCH OF A PROMINENT MILITARY OFFICER AND WELL-KNOWN CITIZEN

Last Thursday morning Colonel Alanson E Niles, of this borough, died at the German hospital in Philadelphia, where he went on the 21st of September to undergo a delicate surgical operation. He stood the operation well and seemed to be on the way to recovery, when Bright’s disease was developed and he rapidly grew weaker until the end. Mrs. Niles and his son Lieut. Nathan E. Niles were at his bedside. The remains were brought home on Friday, and on Saturday afternoon the funeral was held at his late residence on Main street, the burial being with military honors.

Alanson Erric Niles was a son of Mr. Nathan Niles, one of the early settlers of Charleston township. He was born on his father’s farm near this borough October 5, 1816. He inherited the homestead and was engaged in farming until 1857, when he came to this borough and engaged in the mercantile business with Mr. Aaron G. Elliott, the firm of Niles & Elliott doing business in the old wooden building which stood on Main street on the corner just below the First National bank.

In 1861 Mr. Niles was among the first to respond to the call  for volunteers to suppress the Rebellion. He enlisted in this borough, recruiting a company of men, and was elected Captain of Company E of the First Pennsylvania Rifles, better known throughout the country as the “Bucktails.” He was mustered into service May 31, 1861.

At Dranesville on December 20, 1861, the Bucktails are credited with winning the first victory of the war for the army of the Potomac. Here Captain Niles was severely wounded, being shot through the lungs. He was in the hospital some time, but as soon as he was able he hastened back to his regiment.

On the morning of the second day of the battle of Gaines Hill six companies of the Bucktails were stationed on a hill above a swamp to guard a bridge, the only crossing for miles in either direction. When the armies retreated, Companies D and E, with Captain Niles in command, were left to hold the bridge. The boys stood their ground until a Rebel brigade came up in their rear to within ten rods, when they retreated over the brow of the hill to fall into Jackson’s advancing corps. They were completely surrounded and taken prisoners. Company E was the color company of the regiment and rather than have their flag fall into Rebel hands they burned it in the swamp. Captain Niles was in Libby prison for 49 days, when he was exchanged, together with most of the members in his company, and they at once went to the front again.

Captain Niles was promoted to the rank of Major on March 1, 1863, and on the 15th of May following he was made Lieutenant-Colonel of the regiment. It was while with the Bucktails in their charge on Little Round Top at Gettysburg, on the 2d of July, 1863, that he was wounded in the left thigh.

Lieut Col Niles was afterward transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps with promotion to the rank of Colonel. He commanded the corps during the raids of the famous Mosby in eastern Virginia, and at White House Landing he held the field against Mosby’s men for one whole day, when he was relieved by Gen. Sheridan.

Colonel Niles was then sent to Point Lookout, a general depot for prisoners, where he remained in charge until after Lee’s surrender. He then went to Washington.

On the night that President Lincoln was assassinated Col Niles was in Ford’s theater, and he heard the pistol shot and hastened to the hallway and saw the wounded President being carried out.

Col Niles participated in the following battles during the war: New Creek, Hunter’s Mills, Dranesville, Gaines Hill of the seven days fight before Richmond, Fredericksburg, South Mountain, Antietam and Gettysburg.

When the war closed and the grand review was held in Washington Colonel Niles was selected from among the thousands of officers to be the officer of the day, and he had full military charge of the city at the time.

Col Niles was then commissioned as Captain in the regular Army, and for three years he was stationed at Plattsburgh, N.Y., in command of the military barracks.

On account of disability by reason of his wounds he was retired in 1869 with the rank and pay of a Captain, and he came to this borough to reside. After his retirement he lived here quietly, enjoying the respect and esteem of his neighbors, and always taking a lively interest in the affairs of the Government. He was an ardent lover of rifle-shooting and recently notwithstanding his years, he made some remarkable scores on the rifle range.

It can truthfully be said of Col Niles that he was a stranger to fear and a martyr to duty. His record during the war was one of great personal courage and of thorough devotion to the exact discharge of military duty in every station. At home among his friends although of a naturally retiring nature, he was cheerful, genial and steadfast.

Col Niles was married November 10, 1842 to Angeline Austin, of Charleston. Two sons and two daughters were born to them. His widow and Lieut Nathan E. Niles of the Navy, survive him.

The funeral was held last Saturday afternoon at the family residence and it was largely attended. Rev. Dr. A.C. Shaw conducted the service. The Cook Post, G.A.R. attended in a body, and twenty five members of Col Niles’s company acted as a military escort to the cemetery and tenderly committed the remains of their late commander to the dust. Each member wore the distinguishing bucktail on his hat. Among the many floral tributes was a buck constructed of white flowers, which was a testimonial of Company E of the Bucktails. At the cemetery the service was in charge of the Cook Post No. 315, G.A.R.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania Oct 14, 1891

Image from Find-A-Grave

Mr. Henry Clay Roland died at his home in Delmar township last Friday morning — a victim of the prevalent influenza. Mr. Roland was born in Lycoming county forty-eight years ago; but he came to this county when still young, living for a time in Charleston and afterward in Delmar.

During the war of the Rebellion he was an efficient soldier of the Union, being a member of Company E of the Bucktails, under the late Colonel Niles.

After the war he was engaged in farming, and he was an excellent citizen and a man respected and liked by all his acquaintances. The funeral was largely attended last Sunday at the family residence, many of Mr. Roland’s old comrades being present. The interment was in the cemetery in this borough. Mr. Roland leaves a widow and four children — two sons and two daughters.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Apr 6, 1892

Flag image from the Descendant’s Association of the 149th PA Bucktails

Death of Mr. Jacob Huck.

Mr. Jacob Huck, aged 72, died after a week’s illness of pneumonia, on Friday evening at the home of Mr. George W. Smith, at Cedar Run, with whom he made his home. He was a member of Co. E, of the famous 1st Pa. Rifles, or “Bucktails,” and served through the civil war. Five brothers also served in this war.

Mr. Huck had been a member of Wellsboro Lodge, I.O.O.F., for 25 years. He was a conscientious, upright Christian gentleman and was respected and esteemed by all who knew him. Mr. Huck never married. He is survived by the following brothers and sisters: Messrs. Harrison Huck, of Lockhaven; Myron, of Delmar, and Samuel and John, who live in the West, and Mrs. Bert Lloyd, of Olmsville. The Wellsboro Odd Fellows sent a beautiful floral offering and several members of that Lodge besides many Slate Run Odd Fellows attended the funeral at the Cedar Run Methodist church on Monday at 2 p.m.

The following was written by a comrade of the deceased:

“Sergeant Jacob Huck was one of six brothers who enlisted in 1861. Jacob, George and Samuel served in Co. E, of the “Old Bucktails.” Jacob was Color Sergeant for two years and during that time he was wounded three times. At the battle of Cold Harbor a Rebel soldier seized the flag staff and tried to capture the colors. Huck killed him instantly by running him through with a saber. As a soldier and friend none excelled him. He was characterized by his extreme modesty, never mentioning his brave deeds to his most intimate friends. His brothers, Harrison, of Lockhaven, and Myron, of Delmar, with their families, and his sister, Mrs. Bert Lloyd, of Olmsville, attended the funeral. Comrades G.O. Darby, Peter D. Walbridge and W.W. English, of Co. E, with three other veterans acted as pall bearers.”

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Mar 1, 1905

Image from Find-A-Grave

Mr. Chester F. Kimball, aged 64, died Saturday evening about 9 o’clock at his home on Crafton street. He was apparently as well as usual on Saturday afternoon, but was stricken suddenly with paralysis about 4 o’clock while making purchases in Finkelstein Bros.’ store. He was removed to his home, where he passed away within a few hours.

Mr. Kimball was born at Homer, Cortland county, N.Y., on April 30th, 1842. He was twice married, his first wife being Sarah Boydson, whom he married on December 20, 1870. and who died on May 18, 1878. Two sons were born to them, Charles N. Kimball, Esq., of Sistersville, West Virginia, and Mr. Everett E. Kimball, of Cleveland, Ohio, both of whom survive.

On April 30, 1890, Mr. Kimball married Sarah Rollins, of Roundtop, who survives him, with one daughter, Clara A.

Two sisters also survive him, Mrs. Adelbert Green, of Syracuse, N.Y., and Mrs. Miles Dunbar, of Necedah, Wisconsin.

Mr. Kimball enlisted on August 7, 1861, in Co. E, of the 1st Pa. rifles, better known as the “Old Bucktails.” He served with honor and distinction and was one of the best soldiers in his company. He later served with the 13th Veteran Reserve Corps. He was a member of the Union Veteran Legion and of the Methodist church. The deceased was a good man, an upright and progressive citizen and was highly esteemed by all who knew him.

Funeral services will be held this morning at 10 o’clock at the late home of the deceased, Rev. W.H. Reese, D.D., officiating.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Jan 30, 1907

 

Another Veteran Mustered Out.

At his home near Ewing, Neb., February 16th, of bronchitis, Orsamus P. Borden answered the final roll call. He was born November 30, 1829 at Pultney, N.Y., and at the time of his death was 77 years, 2 months and 16 days old.

When a young man he moved with his parents to Tioga county, Pa. He married Miss Sarah Impson, January 28, 1854, in Delmar, Pa. To this union were born four children, three sons and one daughter, only one of whom survive, namely, Arthur H. Borden of Genessee, Potter county. His wife died April 17, 867.

On November 2, 1867, he married Miss Josephine S. Butler, his present wife. To them were born thirteen children of whom five are living, three sons and two daughters.

In 1861, Mr. Borden enlisted in Company E of the “Bucktails.” He served through the entire war. Was taken prisoner at Mechanicsville, June 26, 1862, and spent some time in Libby and Belle Island prisons.

In 1882 he moved his family to Nebraska and settled on a homestead, where he spent the remainder of his days, and with his faithful wife, fought the hard battles, and faced the privations of a frontier life. In courage and fidelity to what he considered right, he proved himself in every respect a man. He was a member of the Grand Army, General Anger Post 192 of Ewing, and no one of its members was more faithful in attendance at its meetings, or more loyal to its laws.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Mar 27, 1907

Another Veteran Gone.

Samuel Freeland, aged 75 years, died last Tuesday morning at 3:45 o’clock at his home in Corning of paralysis.

Mr. Freeland was born in Chatham Tioga county, Pa., December 1, 18[3]3, and the early part of his life was spent on farms in different parts of this country. When the civil war broke out he enlisted in Company A, Bucktails. Early in the war he was captured by the Confederates and was in Libby prison for a number of weeks until he was exchanged. When he entered this famous prison pen he was a large man, weighing over 200 pounds but so severe was his treatment that when he came from the confinement he tipped the scale at only 100 pounds. He was so worn and changed that his own brother failed to recognize him. He again went into active serviced and shortly after he was wounded in the right hip. He lay for four days on the battle field where he received the wound and was finally found by the Rebels and again taken to Libby prison. During the days that he lay on the filed of battle he had only one drink of water, this from the canteen of a Rebel captain. This time he was confined in Libby prison only about six weeks and when exchanged he was honorably discharged from service because of his wound. He carried the bullet to the day of his death.

After recovering from his injury he lived at Addison where he worked in the sash and blind factory and where he married Mary L. Seaman on the first day of February, 1865. He also lived at Coudersport for a time. About four years ago he removed to Corning where he had since lived. Besides his wife he is survived by five children — G.V. Freeland, of Spokane, Wash., C.H. Freeland, of Corning; William Freeland, of Hunt, N.Y.; Mrs. Arthur Slad with whom he lived, and Mrs. Rose Varner, of Albany Falls.

He was a member of the Arch Jones Post, G.A.R. at Coudersport, and was one of the charter members of the W.W. Angle Post, at Addison.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania Mar 3, 1909

Image from the Richard Warren Smith family tree on Ancestry.com

Benjamin W. Topping, Sr., died recently at his home in Elmira, aged 79 years. He is survived by his widow, one son, B.W. Topping, Jr.; one daughter, Mrs. B.G. Birney, of Cincinnati. Mr. Topping had been a resident of Elmira for many years. He was a veteran of the civil war and was a captain in Co. H, Pennsylvania “Bucktails.” He was a commercial traveler for 35 years and, as a cigar salesman, was well known in almost every city and town in northern Pennsylvania and southern New York.

Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania Feb 21, 1917

Image from Find-A-Grave

DEATH OF P.D. WALBRIDGE.

Highly Esteemed Civil War Veteran Died Last Wednesday.

Peter D. Walbridge, aged 83 years, died at the Blossburg hospital early last Wednesday morning, following the amputation of his right leg, which operation was performed Monday. Mr. Walbridge’s right foot had caused him much suffering for several years and not long ago gangrene developed and amputation of his knee was necessary as the only hope of saving is life, but he failed to recover from the shock of the operation.

He is survived by one son, Peter D. Walbridge, Jr., of Pueblo, Colorado, and three daughters, Mrs. W.D. Riffle and Miss May Walbridge, of Wellsboro, and Miss Maude Walbridge, of New York city.

Mr. Walbridge served with conspicuous bravery during the civil war as a member of Co. E, of the famous “Old Bucktails” regiment, and many are the tales of heroism his comrades tell of him, but Mr. Walbridge seldom spoke of his own experiences during the dark days of ’61-’65. He was a prisoner at Andersonville for nearly a year and that trying ordeal took a heavy toll from his naturally strong constitution. Mr. Walbridge had a host of warm friends to whom his death brings deepest sorrow.

The funeral was held Saturday afternoon at two o’clock at the First Baptist church, Rev. C.W. Macgeorge officiating; burial in the Wellsboro cemetery.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Dec 3, 1919

BRILLIANT WAR RECORD.

Brief Review of a Brave Soldier’s Career During the Civil War.

The brilliant and gallant Civil War record of the late Peter D. Walbridge, of Wellsboro, who died a few days ago at the Blossburg Hospital, following amputation of his left leg for gangrene, should not pass unnoticed. He was one of the first from Wellsboro to enlist in the original Old Bucktails under Captain Alanson E. Niles and served throughout the entire Civil War.

Notwithstanding Peter Walbridge was always conceded one of the bravest and most daring soldiers of the fighting Bucktails, having performed many heroic deeds worthy of note, he bore his honors meekly, without display, blow or bluster. He had a big heart and it was in the right place, as all his comrades in arms can testify.

The Gazette takes great pride in presenting the following summary of this brave soldier’s war record:

Peter D. Walbridge enlisted April 28th, 1861, from Wellboro, Pa., and was mustered into the United States service May 31st, 1861, at Harrisburg, as a private to serve for a term of three years in Company E, First Regiment, Penna. Vol. Rifles, under Captains A.E. Niles and S.J. Mack and Cols. Theodore L. Kane, J. Biddle, H.W. McNeil and C.F. Taylor. The Regiment was the 42nd Pa. Vol. Inf., 1st Bucktails or 13th Regiment, Penna. Reserves Infantry.

Moved to a point opposite Cumberland, Md., June 22nd, thence to West Va., in support of Lew Wallace till October; then moved to Tennallytown and attached to McCall’s Reserve Division, Army of Potomac. Engaged at Drainesville, Va., Dec. 20th, ’61. Moved to Virginia Peninsula, June 9th to 12th, ’62.

Attached to 5th Corps Army of Potomac. Engaged in seven days battle before Richmond, Jun 25th to July 1st, ’62; battle of Mechanisville, June 26th; Meadow Bridge, June 26th; Gainesville, July 27th; Savage Station, June 29th; Charles City, Cross-Road and Glendale, Jun 30th ’62; Malvern Hill, July 1st, ’62; battles of Gailnesville and Groveton, August 28th and 29th, ’62; Second Bull Run, August 30th, ’62; South Mountain, Md. Sept. 1?, Antietam, Md., Sept. 7th, ’62. Was wounded here by gunshot in right leg and sent to Harrisburg. Received 50 days furlough to go home from Governor Curtin. Rejoined regiment and participated in battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 13th, ’62, and March, January 20th to 24th, ’63.

Ordered to Washington, D.C., Feb. 6th, ’63. Duty there and at Alexandria till June 25th, ’63. Rejoined the Potomac Army, June 25th, ’63. Attached to 1st Brigade, 3rd Div., 5th Corps, Army of Potomac. Engaged in Battle of Gettysburg, July 1st to 3rd, ’63. Pursuit of Lee, July 5th to 24th, ’63. Engaged at Rappahannock Station, Nov. 7th, ’63; Mine Run, Nov. 26th and 28th, ’63.

Honorably discharged Feb. 27th, ’64. Re-enlisted as a veteran Feb. 28th, ’64, in the field as Sergeant in same Company and Regiment, three years more, or during the war, under Captains S.J. Mack and Col. A.E. Niles. Participated in Battle of the Wilderness, May 5th-7th, ’64;; Laurel Hill, Va., May 8th; Spottsylvania, May 8th to 12th, ’64; assault on the Bloody Angle, May 12th ’64; Spottsylvania Court House, May 13th to 21st, ’64; Harris Farm, May 19th; North Anna River, May 23rd to 26th, ’64; Jericho Ford, May 25th; Penunkeg River, May 26th to 28th; Totokotomy, May 29th to 31st; Bethesda Church, May 30th to June 6th.

Was wounded May 30th in head, left leg and right arm by shell explosion and was captured and taken to Spotts Hospital, Richmond, Va., until July ’64. Then was placed in Andersonville, later Florence, prison. Was paroled and sent to Annapolis, Md. Received furlough home until April, 1865. Rejoined regiment. Was on May 31st, 1865, transferred to Co. E, 190th Reg., Pa. Vol., Infantry, which he joined close to Petersburg. Engaged at Appomattox Court House, Lee’s surrender, April 9th, 1865. Washington, D.C., May 1st to 12th; Grand Review, May 23rd, 1865. Honorably discharged June 28th, 1865, at Harrisburg, by reason of close of war.

The Wellsboro Gazette (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Dec 11, 1919

Image from Find-A-Grave

CIVIL WAR VETERAN ANSWERS LAST CALL

James T. Hebel, 79 years old, a veteran of the Civil War, while accompanying a neighbor, Joseph Lenig from his home in Hunter’s Valley to Newport, Perry County, Pa., on Friday morning, May 26, got off the wagon in the narrows, along the steep mountain road to walk up a hill, and while walking along back of the wagon, dropped dead in the road. Death was due to heart failure.

His son, Alfred of Osecola Mills, went to visit him on Monday, May 22, as had been his custom, about every four to six weeks. On Tuesday morning his father suggested that they go to Newport on Wednesday morning, as he wanted to buy a suit and hat and shoes to wear to the Memorial services at Liverpool on Sunday, May 28 and on Tuesday, May 30. As planned, they went to Newport on Wednesday morning and after making the purchases, and were about to part to go in different directions to their homes, and as his father said “Good Bye” to his boy he remarked, he would wear his new clothes to the memorial services, neither thinking that the time was so near at hand when he should answer the final “roll call” and be numbered among those whose graves would be strewn with flowers, by his few surviving comrades on that day.

Mr. Hebel was born near Liverpool Perry County, Pa., March 19th, 1843. He was the son of George and Rosanna (Matchet) Hebel, natives of Lancaster and Dauphin Counties. The early part of his life was spent in working as a millwright with his father. He was eighteen years old when the Civil War broke out and at once enlisted in the service of his country in Co. B, 7th Penna. Reserves, being organized at Liverpool by Capt. G.K. Shull and after serving in this regiment and company for some time was transferred to the “Old Bucktails” and at the expiration of his 3 year enlistment re-enlisted, for three years more, or until the close of the war. He took part in nearly all the important battles between the Army of the Potomac and the Confederate forces under command of Robert E. Lee, from the first battle of Bull Run to Appomattox. Then took part in the Grand Review at Washington, D.C. Then went to Harrisburg where he was honorably discharged from the United States Service, July 5th, 1865, after having served his country over four years, in its most trying hours.

He then returned to his home in Perry County, but in December of the same year, came to Clearfield, where he learned the carpenter trade under Ezra Ale. During the spring of 1867 he was united in marriage to Miss Charlotte Deis, and moved to Luthersburg, where he followed his trade, farming and lumbering until October 1897 when he was appointed and assumed the position of post master. He resigned that position April, 1906 and moved to Curwensville where his wife died on the 19th of December 1907. He then returned to Perry county and purchased forty acres of land in Hunter’s Valley, near the place of his birth, and about midway between Newport and Liverpool, where he lived during the summer and spent the winter with his four surviving children, Alfred M. of Osceola Mills, Mrs. Mary Freedline of Bell Township near Mahaffey, Clearfield County, Pa., Mrs. C.U. Downs of Kansas City, Mo and Warren L. of Harrisburg, Pa. He is also survived by nine grandchildren.

His Body was taken to Osceola Mills to the home of his son Alfred, on Saturday evening at which place funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 4:30 o’clock, conducted by Rev. J.W. Shillington of the M.E. Church. On Monday morning the body was taken to Luthersburg where it was laid to rest beside that of his wife and deceased children.

Mr. Hebel was a kind and affectionate father and was dearly loved by his children. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church from the time he first moved to Luthersburg until he returned to Perry County, where he associated himself with the church he attended as a boy and was regular in attendance at services until his advanced age made it almost impossible for him to walk the six miles to the church and back.

Clearfield Progress (Clearfield, Pennsylvania) Jun 2, 1922

AGED CIVIL WAR VETERAN DIES

Eugene H. Stone Was Nearly One Hundred Two Years Old.

Eugene H. Stone, of near Wellsboro, civil war veteran, died at the Soldiers’ Facility, Bath, N.Y., Thurdays afternoon, Sept. 2, after a long illness.

There is now only one civil war veteran living in Tioga county, John Eldridge Harvey, aged 101, of Westfield.

Mr. Stone was a half-brother of the late William A. Stone, a former governor of Pennsylvania. He was born in Delmar, Jan. 31, 1842, son of Israel and Abbie Stone. At the age of 19 in August, 1861, he enlisted with Co. E, 42nd Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, known as the Bucktails.

Mr. Stone was captured July 22, 1862, at the battle of Mechanicsville, after being in the battles of South Mountain and Antietam. He was held prisoner at Libby and Belle Isle Prisons 40 days, when he was exchanged and rejoined his regiment. He was mustered out Aug. 7, 1864, at Petersburg, Va.

On Nov. 9, 1864, he married Sarah Francis, daughter of Ephraim Francis, of Charleston. For six years they resided on his parents’ farm and then he purchased adjoining farms in Shippen and Delmar townships.

He went to Pawnee county, Kans., where he took up 160 acres of government land. Three years later he returned to Tioga county.

He served as school director and Shippen township Supervisor, was a member of the Masons and the Grange.

The funeral was held Saturday at the Johnson Funeral Home in Wellsboro, Rev. C.W. Sheriff officiating’; burial in the West Branch cemetery.

Mr. Stone is survived by a son, Fred A. stone, of Ansonia; two daughters, Mrs. Hobart Maynard and Mrs. Rankin Stermer, of Wellboro, R.D.; five grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren.

The first three “Bucktail” companies were organized by Thomas L. Kane at Smethport, McKean county, in April, 1861. One volunteer, seeing a deer suspended in front of a market, cut off the buck’s tail and stuck it in his hat and when he enlisted the name “Bucktail” was adopted.

The Tioga county contingent was organized in early May, 1861, by R.C. Cocks, of Liberty, afterward Colonel of the 207th Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers and later advanced to Brigadier General, in answer to President Lincoln’s call for 75,000 men.

The Wellsboro regiment was commanded by Alanson [E.] Niles. This troop, with four others, marched overland to Troy and took the Northern Central Railroad to Harrisburg, announcing the arrival at the state capitol by a salvo of musketry. The contingent became Co. E, First Pennsylvania Rifle Regiment, and entered active service.

Mr. Stone participated in many of the principal battles of the war. He had three brothers in the Union forces. One was a member of his own company. All returned to their homes at the close of the war.

Of adult population of 6,000, 2,000 Tioga county men enlisted in the civil war and 445 never came back, a record equaled by only one other county in the union in proportion to population.

Wellsboro Agitator (Wellboro, Pennsylvania) Sep 8, 1943

Was Anna Glud Really a Drummer Boy?

May 17, 2010

Wanderlust? Pride? Vanity? Sex?

Why Girls Turn “Men”
[Excerpt]

Mrs. Anna Glud of Oakland, Calif., at the outbreak of the Civil War, donned the uniform of a Union drummer boy and marched away to the front.

For more than two years she saw active service where the fight was thickest and amid the cannon’s roar beat out upon her drum the rally call which once turned near defeat to victory and stemmed the tide of battle.

SECRET 50 YEARS.

Mrs. Glud is now 68 and kept secret her experience as the boy drummer, “Tom Hunley,” for almost 50 years.

General Grant, though, was “let in” on it while the war was still in progress.

The general was inspecting “Tom Hunley’s” regiment and, seeing the diminutive “drummer boy,” ordered “him” mustered out as too young for service.

Mrs. Glud’s father interceded at this juncture and told Grant that his daughter was motherless and that he could not bear to leave her home alone.

The general swore himself to secrecy and ordered “Tom” to be retained.

Said the former “drummer boy” reminiscing:

“During all the time that I was in the army many remarked that I looked more like a girl than a boy. But not one soldier actually found it out.

SAW MANY DIE

“Father and I kept so constantly together that I was always protected. Had I not had his assistance at all times, I doubt that I could have stood the rigors of a soldier’s life.
“Why, in a battle near Davisville, where 7000 Confederates and Northerners were killed, our little body of men literally had to climb over the bodies of dead soldiers in order to fight our way out. My little feet were red with blood. And when we were mustered out in the fall of 1864 there were but 17 members of our company left.”

After the war “Tom Hunley” and her father settled down on a farm in Indiana. But the rigors of the conflict proved too much for the father, who followed his wife and four sons into the Beyond six months later.

Then “Tom Hunley” became Anna once more and never since has she changed the attire of her sex.

Other women, too, have put on masculine guise in time of war.

Patriotism moved them to such tactics, but more often they entered service to be near loved ones.

Modesto Evening News (Modesto, California) Sep 6, 1924

This article is almost the same as the one above, but it names her father as Jeremiah Hunley:

AGED WOMAN BARES SECRET OF YOUTH; SHE WAS DRUMMER BOY IN UNION ARMY

OAKLAND, Cal. — For 58 years Mrs. Anna Glud, of this city, has nursed a romantic secret.

And then, on her 68th birthday, with a family group about her, the white haired old lady revealed the amazing story of how, at the outbreak of the civil war, she had cut her hair, donned the uniform of a Union fighter and gone to the war as Tom Hunley a drummer boy.

That she had not previously bared her secret was due partially to the fact that her family had been divided on the war issues and she waited for time to heal the wounds; partially because of a somewhat natural reluctance.

But she did not wish the secret to go to the grave with her and so the story of Tom Hunley came to light.

Two persons had known her secret — Jermiah Hunley, her father and Gen. Grant, in whose charge her father had placed her.

The Hunley’s lived in a “border” state. Two sons went with the Union forces and two with the Confederate. Then the father was called.

Father Cuts Hair.

The prospect of leaving his little girl among strangers, unprotected and uncared for, was too much, so he dressed her in the uniform of a drummer boy, cut off her hair, told her to always remember her name was “Tom,” and joined the regiment.

For two years “Tom” Hunley and “his” father served with the Union forces in the bloodiest battles of the civil war. Never once was the identity of the little “drummer boy” suspected. There came a day, however, when Jeremiah was forced to reveal the secret of his daughter’s masquerade. General Grant inspected the regiment and seeing the diminutive “drummer boy” decided “he” was too young for active service, and ordered “him” mustered out. Thereupon Jermiah told him the story of the motherless little girl. The General swore himself to secrecy and ordered “Tom” Hunley’s retention in the service.

Reminiscing, the former “Tom” Hunley said: “During all that time though many remarked that I looked more like a girl than a boy, not one soldier discovered that I was a girl. Father and I kept together so constantly that I was always protected. Had I not had his assistance at all times, I doubt that I could have stood the rigors of a soldier’s life during those two dreadful years.

Feet Red With Blood.

“Why, in a battle near Davisville, when 7000 confederates and northerners were killed, our little body of men literally had to climb over the bodies of dead soldiers in order to fight our way out. My little feet were red with blood. And when we were mustered out in the fall of 1864 there were but 17 members of our company left.”

The war over, Jermiah and “Tom” Hunley settled down in Indiana. But the rigors of war were too much for the father and in six months time he followed his wife and four sons into the Beyond, leaving his little girl, now re-attired in the dress of her sex, to continue life under the guidance of newly-made friends.

Twenty years later, General Grant died without having revealed the secret of “Tom” Hunley, and a secret it has remained until recently when Mrs. Glud revealed it.

Logansport Pharos Tribune (Logansport, Indiana) Apr 11, 1921

The above clipping ran in the following papers, as well as others:

Logansport Pharos Tribune (Logansport, Indiana) Aug 18, 1922
Iowa City Press Citizen (Iowa City, Iowa) Aug 26, 1922

Mansfield News (Mansfield, Ohio) Aug 19, 1922

WOMAN WHO WAS DRUMMER BOY IN THE CIVIL WAR KEPT IT SECRET FOR SIXTY-THREE YEARS

BY H.O. THOMPSON
United News Staff Correspondent

Oakland, Cal., June 1 — Tom Hundley, the drummer who thumped away bravely while bullets whined on a dozen battlefield of the Civil war, was a girl.

After keeping her secret for 63 years, Mrs. Annie Glud celebrated Memorial day by pulling a battered old drum from its khaki case and casting aside the mystery with which she concealed the exploits of her early years.

Mrs. Glud was the “Tom” who enlisted at the age of 10 and who served for nearly three years in the trouble-laden days of the sixties. Only General Grant and the girl’s father knew the truth.

Erect and with a sparkle of excitement in eyes that still need no spectacles to aid them, Mrs. Glud strapped her beloved drum to her waist and beat again, but not so vigorously, the old battle rhythms.

There is a spot of fading red in the center of that drum. It has been there for more than a half-century.

“Tom” and the company were before Richmond. In a shot skirmish with the Confederates the bugler fell. The “drummer boy” caught the dying lad and propped him against the drum head as life passed. A few days later “Tom” was mustered out of service.

Tanned, and with lines that seemed out of place in a youngster’s face, “Tom” became Annie Hudley again and went back to pig-tailed girlhood.

“How did it feel to be in battle?”

Mrs. Glude asked, repeating a question. “Well, I remember that I used to get mad, real mad when the bullets whistled by.”

Mrs. Glud had two brothers in the Confederate army and four who wore the blue of the north. she herself was with her father, who, acting as a scout through territory well known to him, led the Union armies on quick dashes against the enemy. Father and daughter were always together. “Tom” would follow closely behind the guide as they pressed ahead on forced marches.

Sixty years had dimmed the memory of many of those exploits, but in hesitating words that leave no room for doubt, Mrs. Glud speaks of night bivouacs under the open sky, of violence and death, and of the torture of a family divided against itself.

“There is no glamor in war,” she said. “It brings only unhappiness.”

The Evening Independent (St. Petersburg, Florida) – Jun 1, 1925

Oakland Woman Fought As Drummer Boy in ’61

A drummer “boy” who marched with the Union forces in 1862 paraded again yesterday to the stirring notes of martial music, this time at the head of a party that rode a float entered by the Ladies of the Lyon Relief Corps.

The drummer “boy” was Mrs. Annie Glud, 416 East Fifteenth street, who, at the age of 10, enlisted with the Union forces as a drummer boy under the name of Tom Hundley. Only General U.S. Grant and Mrs. Glud’s father knew that “Tom” was a girl. And it was not until 1921, when Mrs. Glud celebrated her sixtyeighth birthday, fifty-eight years after she enlisted, that the secret leaked out.

The war to “Tom Hundley” was not merely a great adventure. Two of her brothers were in the Confederate forces, and two others fought on the side of the North.
Gettysburg and the battle at Richmond just before General Robert E. Lee surrendered were two of the bloodiest battles in which the drummer “boy” participated.
Mrs. Glud still owns the drum which she carried during the hectic days of the sixties. It is her proudest possession, she says.

Although the drummer “boy” has marched in so many Decoration and Armistice Day parades that she has almost lost count of them, she never tires of taking part. They bring back, she says, the stirring experiences of the Civil War.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Nov 12, 1927

American Heroines

By LOUISE M. COMSTOCK

“Tom” Hunley

IN 1862 there was enlisted in the Union forces engaged in the Civil war a drummer boy named Tom Hunley. He was a frail little fellow, whom the soldiers often teased with looking more like a girl than a boy. But his father, Jeremiah Hunley, enlisted in the same regiment, kept Tom close at his side and protected him not only from the taunts but even from the friendship of their comrades in arms. And for three years little Tom drummed the Northern troops along their weary marches and into desperate battle, and only two people, his own father and General Grant, ever knew that he was no drummer boy, but a little girl!

Tom’s father carried the secret to his grave a few years after the close of the war. And General Grant told none. So that is was not until 60 years after her heroic deeds that the drummer boy herself, then a white-haired old lady, Mrs. Anna Glud of Oakland, Calif., told the strange story.

Jeremiah Hunley and his five motherless children lived in a border state. When the Civil war opened, two sons joined up with the Union side, two with the Confederates. Then the father was called. Afraid to leave his only remaining child, Anna, then ten years old, alone, friendless in a contested territory, he cut off her hair, dressed her in boy’s clothes, told her to answer to the name “Tom” and set off to join the Union army. For two years “Tom” gallantly accompanied her father.

Then, on day, General Grant inspected his troops. He was particularly struck with the diminutive drummer boy, decided she was too small for action, and ordered her mustered out and sent home to her mother! There was only one thing for her father to do. As soon as he could gain a private hearing with the general he explained that the drummer boy was no boy but his own daughter, and laid before him the circumstances which had prompted the deception. He begged that he might be allowed to keep her with him. And General Grant straightway shook the little drummer boy’s hand, swore himself to keep her secret, and ordered her retained in the service.

Thus it was not until the end of the war that little Anna Hunley returned to the dress and life that befitted a little girl.

The Nashua Reporter (Nashua, Iowa) Dec 7, 1932

Title: Tom Hundley, the drummer boy: or, A secret that General Grant kept. A drama of 1861
Author: Mrs. Annie Hundley
Publisher: Published by the author, 1899 (Google Book LINK)

You can read Annie’s book online. The first part of it is basically a play script, followed by a narrative of her life. What came to mind when I started reading it, was the play, The Drummer Boy of Shiloh that was all the rage in the late 1800′s.  I wonder if that is what inspired her to write her story. The whole book is only 44 pages, so it is a really quick read, although, in my opinion reads like a dime-store historical fiction/romance novel.

I wonder if the play mentioned below, is the one from her book:

WOMEN, GIRLS ’61-’65.

The Women and Girl Workers of the Civil War, ’61-’65, met at 2 o’clock Wednesday afternoon. The sick were reported no better and the sick committee asked to visit them.

A rising vote of thanks was extended to Sister Glud, the author of the play put on Saturday night at the Auditorium. The workers will hold their annual birthday party on the third Wednesday in November. Songs and recitations by various members of the workers composed the program for the afternoon’s entertainment. The meeting closed with community singing.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Oct 24, 1920

GIRLS OF ’61-’65

On Wednesday, March 30, the third anniversary of the Girls of ’61-’65 was celebrated in Memorial hall. A chicken dinner was served in the banquet room to members, comrades and a number of invited guests. A table was reserved and decorated for those having birthdays this month. Mrs. Anna Glud and Mrs. Mary Morrin furnished two delicious birthday cakes for this table.

After dinner all adjourned to the hall and listened to the program of the afternoon. Comrade Stern, a visitor from Wisconsin, gave an interesting talk, taking for his subject “A Lincoln Monument.” He expressed surprise that a city the size of Oakland should not have some memorial to Lincoln. He congratulated the Girls on taking the initiative for the work, by giving an entertainment at the Auditorium on March 26.

An original poem written in honor of the day was read by Comrade Brinkerhoff. Another pleasing reading entitled “Old Chromos” was given by Comrade Eastman. Mrs. Fannie Ward Miller took over the program and read a description of Lincoln written fifty years ago by Governor Ogelsby as an introduction to Lincoln’s Gettyburg address.

Another enjoyable number was the singing of Mrs. Florence Sewell, accompanied by Miss Randolph. Mrs. Sewell sang “Mignon” and as encore gave “Silver Threads Among the Gold” and “Clover Leaf.” A piano and violin solo was given by the Misses Cook and Kolmodin. Mrs. Blake Alverson, who is 84 years old, was present and spoke to the girls and for the first time since the days of ’61 was not able to sing, but recited an old song, the rage in the days of the Civil War.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Apr 3, 1921

WOMEN AND GIRL WORKERS HEAR CIVIL WAR STORY

Once applicant was received at the meeting of the Women and Girl Workers of the Civil War last Wednesday afternoon in Memorial hall. Captain Viola Murphy presided.

Captain Murphy read “The Childhood History of Mrs. Anna Glud,” telling of her home and surroundings and her experiences as a drummer boy in the Civil War.

Comrade Garfield, Spanish War veteran, spoke on one of the leading topics of the day. Comrade William Crowhurst announced that at the convention of the grand lodge of Odd Fellows at Pasadena recently over 1600 were present and the main subject discussed was “Home and Mother.”

Comrade Scupham introduced Comrade Smith who was for four years in naval service. Captain Clara Wood of Division 5, of Sacramento recited “Starry Flag of Ours.” Mrs. Anna Jordan favored with a piano selection. The order accepted an invitation from Col. Wyman Circle, G.A.R., to attend a picnic.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Jul 26, 1924

G.A.R. Auxiliary To Give Dinner For Post on 15th

Plans were completed for the dinner to be given the men September 15 by Colonel John B. Wyman Cirle No. 22, Ladies of the G.A.R., Tuesday afternoon. Dinner will be served at noon, to which comrades and their wives are invited.

At the meeting one applicant was initiated and two applications received.

Louise Noack, chairman of the home committee, thanked the committee for aiding in the decoration of the float for the Dons of Peralta parade. Anna Glud was thanked for her drum beating in the parade.

About a hundred members attended the Bay District Association of the Lady Maccabees Tuesday evening the women being entertained by Golden Poppy Hive No. 1016.

A banquet followed.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Sep 12, 1925

CIVIL WAR GIRL WORKERS THANK TWO FOR GIFTS

A rising vote of thanks was given to Mrs. Anna Glud at the meeting of the Women and Girl Workers of the Civil War, Wednesday afternoon in Memorial hall for a large decorated cake. Harry Williams was thanked for floral gifts.

Clinton Dodge and T. Thompson spoke on the Anita Whitney case. Captain Viola Murphy presided.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Oct 31, 1925

G.A.R. Women Visit at County Home With Gifts

Because of the inclement weather last Saturday only a small group of members of the Women and Girls Workers of the Civil War and Col. John B. Wyman Circle No. 22, Ladies of the G.A.R. visited the County Home. The Assembly hall at the home was packed with men and women waiting to welcome the visitors.

A short program was given under the direction of Anna Glud and May David. Mrs. Glud recited “The Drummer Boy in the Civil War,” and gave taps, assisted by Mrs. Ada Rowe at the piano.

Candy and fruit was distributed, and many magazines presented. Greetings were expressed for a merry Christmas and happy New Year.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Dec 26, 1925

Lyon Corps Entertains

Lyon Relief Corps No. 6, G.A.R., entertained the department president of the W.R.C. and staff at luncheon Wednesday at the Hotel Oakland. Honored guests were Emma J. Alexander, department president; Rosa B. Sturtevant, department senior vice president; Kate Humphreys, department counselor, and Carrie Bartlett, first member of the executive board.

At the regular meeting of the corps held in the Veterans’ Memorial building, Alice Harrington presided. Many relief calls were reported and flowers were sent sick members. Mrs. Anna Glud was reported seriously ill.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Feb 9, 1929

Mountain View Cemetery (Image from Find-A-Grave)

Corps Sponsors Club for Juniors

Lyon Corps, auxiliary to the G.A.R., in compliance with the request of the national organization, has endorsed the suggestion that the corps sponsor a junior club. Any loyal girl between the ages of 8 and 16, is eligible to membership.

At the meeting Wednesday, a fitting tribute to the late Mrs. Anna Glud, written by Comrade G.A. Blank, was read by Department Senior Vice President Rosa B. Sturtevant.

The corps voted to accept the invitation of Oakland Post No. 5, American Legion, to attend a patriotic program in the Veterans’ building next Tuesday.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Feb 16, 1929

Annie Glud seems to have been a woman of many interests and talents:

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, ANNIE GLUD, a citizen of the United States, residing in Oakland, county of Alameda, State of California, have invented an Improvement in Fuel Saving Appliances for Grates; and I hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the same.

Patent number: 538511
Filing date: Feb 12, 1895
Issue date: Apr 1895

GOOGLE LINK to the complete patent.

WOMAN FINDS A GOLD MINE.

Mrs. Annie Glud Says That She Has Discovered Rich Treasures in the Shasta Mountains.

With her own hands, Mrs. Annie Glud, wife of an Oakland, Cal., sailor, has uncovered a vein of gold in the heart of the Shasta mountains.

It was by merest accident that the hidden wealth was revealed to her, and she has kept the secret for nearly a year. A serious illness prevented her from delving further for the gold. Now she has regained her health, and is ready to start for the claim, which is registered under her own name in the United States land office, at Redding, Cal. Twelve miles from there, in the Shasta mountains, is Stillwater creek, running through the gulch where Mrs. Glud and her husband has pre-empted a quarter section of land.

“One day last October,” she said, “I was strolling down the gulch and was attracted by some shining particles mixed in the black, sandy loam. The thought struck me that they were gold. I thought, if gold is was, I would not dare tell the story of the discovery, fearing some one would ‘jump’ the claim.

“I had heard of panning gold, but there were no mining utensile on the ranch. Finally I decided to try my hand. I went to the cabin, got a tin wash basin, and, crawling to the creek, scooped up a pan of the dirt. After twisting and turning that old wash basin my eyes were delighted with the sight of glittering particles of gold.

“As soon as I was assured the gold was real, I made up my mind that I would own a claim and turn miner. I quietly found out what was necessary to be done and then I staked off a claim 600×500 feet and went to Redding, where I filed on it.”

Then came Mrs. Glud’s serious illness, that stopped further developments temporarily.

“I am going to my mine very soon. You would be surprised at the number of women that want to go with me. Why, this is a Klondike craze in miniature. But I am going to be very careful in the selection of my company, I shall accept no one who cannot meet her own expenses.”

Kansas City journal (Kansas City, Mo.)Aug 25, 1897


GOLD IN THE STREET

Mine Is Discovered at Sixth and Franklin.

Gold has been found on Franklin street. There is excitement in the neighborhood and plans are being evolved to tunnel under some of the houses.

Mrs. Annie Glud of 804 Franklin street is the discoverer of the gold mine at the corner of Sixth and Franklin streets. She has the nuggets and fine gold to show that the mine exists.

Two days ago the electric light men had trouble with Mrs. Mary Kelly over the placing of a pole in front of her house at Sixth and Franklin streets. During the night Mrs. Kelly was outwitted and the men dug the hole and placed the pole. Mrs. Glud happened along while the work was in progress, and she secured a small valise full of dirt taken from the hole. She knows how to mine. The next day she panned the dirt and it netted her $5.25 in gold.

A committee waited on President John A. Britton of the Oakland Gas, Light and Heat Company and told him of the find. Mr. Britton was surprised to hear that his workmen had struck a gold mine.

Yesterday several people called on Mrs. Glud to secure information on the subject. Mrs. Glud said, “Yes, it is true that I made the find. I’ve go the gold.”

Mrs. Glud is now trying to make arrangements with Mrs. Kelley to tunnel under the latter’s house in pursuit of gold. She wants to prospect for the gold.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Apr 12, 1901

These clippings are just a small sample of all the real estate dealings I ran across in the Oakland Tribune, which involved Anna Glud.

TRUSTEES’ SALE.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with the terms and under the authority of a certain deed of trust, dated September 29, 1898, duly executed and delivered by Annie Glud and Paul C. Glud, her husband, of the City of Oakland, County of Alameda and State of California… [default on real property at Center and Fourteenth St]

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) May 28,  1901

June 1904

*****

October 1904

*****

May 1908

*****

1912

The one above is interesting because the transaction involves her son, Charles T. Hunley and his wife.

This headline is a bit misleading! After reading about Anna the “drummer boy,” I thought this was going to be about her once again posing as a male, but it is something much less interesting.

USES DEAD MAN’S NAME.

WOMAN PRIVATE DETECTIVE APPLIES TO BE APPOINTED CITY PRISON MATRON.

Mrs. Anna Glud of 804 Franklin street, who styles herself a private detective, made application to the Board of Police and Fire Commissioners this morning to be appointed matron of the City Prison, vice Mrs. Reed, deceased. The board met to pass the salary warrants for the next month. The application was referred to Chief of Police Hodgkins for a report.

Mrs. Glud had the recommendation of Ex-Mayor Barstow and other prominent members of the community, but inadvertently she appears to have used the same application made two years ago to be appointed matron of the County Jail.

The application had been originally addressed to the Board of Supervisors and Sheriff John Bishop. Whether the old application will prejudice her case or not is a matter for the board to determine.

The discovery was made by Secretary Walter Fawcett, who noticed the name of E.E. Baunce, deceased, in the petition for appointment.

The original application bears the date of December 27, 1902. This date and the name of the Supervisors and that of Sheriff Bishop was turned under.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) May 31, 1904

THREE YOUTHS ARE MISSING FROM HOME

Three more young boys have left their homes in this city and their anxious parents have asked the police to locate them. Mrs. A.B. Burbank of 1361 Thirteenth street reports that Everett Dolan, fourteen years of age, has disappeared. Everett is light complexioned and when he was last seen wore a dark coat and a soft hat.

George Marshall, a messenger, fourteen years of age, has left his home at 15 Eighth street. Young Marshall has been living with Mrs. Glud at the above address. Mrs. Glud called at the police station this morning and stated that she had been caring for the lad for some time and she asked that the police arrest him and place him in jail for a short time, so that he would learn not to run away. The third boy who ran away yesterday was Willie Sparks of 878 Lydia street.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Oct 11, 1906

I think the Oakland area is lucky the City Council did NOT choose the name suggested by Anna Glud:

LADY SUGGESTS A CONSOLIDATED NAME

“City and County of California” is the new suggestion of Mrs. A. Glud, of 1062 Oak street, for a name for the proposed consolidated city of Oakland, Alameda and Berkeley. Mrs. Glud sent her suggestion to the City Council, and it was referred by that body last night to the public improvement committee. Mrs. Glud believes that her suggestion for a name is a fitting one.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) May 21, 1907

Image from flickr - by Tom Spauling

CALAVERAS WOMAN VICTIM OF BUNCO

OAKLAND, July 20. — A.E. Williams, a real estate agent with offices in the First National Bank building, is under arrest here on a charge of felony preferred by Mrs. Anna Glud. Williams is accused of having mulcted many victims of thousands of dollars by means of a fake prospectus and he sale of worthless stock in a fraudulent mining scheme.

The investigation resulting in the apprehension of Williams was made by H.W. Gray of the State Mining Bureau. According to Gray, Williams has cleaned up about $15,000 in his dealings with con???ing school teachers and others.

In a prospectus which was seized as evidence Williams calls himself secretary of the Calaveras Consolidated Mining Company, whose capitalization is named as being 16,000,000 shares.

Several weeks ago Mrs. Glud called on Captain of Inspectors W.J. Petersen. With her in this transaction were Alice Gerkle of Portland, Ore., Eleanor Hilbeard and Byron Hilbeard of Portland and Bertha Nitch and Charles Huntlee of Oakland.

Mrs. Glud says that she and the others owned 160 acres of mining land in Calavera county and that Williams offered to take it in exchange for 30,000 shares in his company, claiming that ultimately she and those associated with her would realize a fortune by the transaction.

Then, Mrs. Glud says, she “signed something,” and subsequently discovered that she had deeded the land to a Mrs. Lillian Martin, who has sold the property to a Mrs. Gleason for $7000.

Later she says she learned that the “shares” she held were worthless, and that the “Calaveras Consolidated Mining Company” did not own any land in Calavera county.

Modesto News (Modesto, California) Jul 20, 1911

Anna Glud even had an extremely green thumb!

“You can’t grow a calla lily in California over three feet in height,” contended a St. Louis woman. Mrs. A. Glud of 1120 Oak street, Oakland, promptly challenged this assertion, and offered to give her St. Louis friend tangible proof that calla lillies, like other flowers, grow at their best in sunny California. In her garden in Oakland Mrs. Glud has grown a calla lily plant, two of the stalks of which are five feet three inches in height, while the giant leaves are 22 inches long. These stalks grew in 22 days.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Jun 18, 1913

I wonder where Anna got this bear, and how she knew who carved it? I tried to find an image of it online, but had no luck. I would be curious to know if this Cinnamon Bear carving is still at the White House or on display somewhere. I did run across an index of Warren Harding’s papers that had her name listed. It would be interesting to read the letter she wrote him.

BEAR CARVED BY MARSHALL TO BE GIVEN TO PRESIDENT

Presentation to Be Made by Organization of Women and Girls of ’61.

The historic cinnamon bear carved by James Marshall, discoverer of gold in California, from California redwood, is to be presented to Warren G. Harding, President of the United States, as a token of respect from Oakland Chapter of the Women and Girl Workers of the Civil War of ’61 and ’65, it was announced today.

The bear, which was carved by Marshall in ’48, the same year that gold was discovered in this state, has long been the property of Mrs. Annie Glud of Oak street, a pioneer worker of the civil war, who has become nationally famous since her recent disclosure that she served in the war as a “drummer boy,” masquerading in male clothing.

Mrs. Glud recently decided to give the treasured relic to President Harding, but chose rather to give it first to the local organization in order that it might be presented in the name of the organization to the nation’s executive.

Local engravers are preparing two plates for the base of the bear, which will read:

“This cinnamon bear was carved by James Marshall in 1848 with a penknife out of redwood grown in Yosemite valley, California.”

“Presented to President Warren G. Harding, by the Women and Girl Workers of the Civil War of ’61 and ’65 (also served in three wars). Oakland, Cal., June 7, 1921.”

A letter offering the bear to the President was sent some weeks ago and has just been answered by the President, carrying his appreciation of the memento and accepting the gift.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Jun 2, 1921

Census Records for Anna Glud

Finding Anna prior to 1900 has proven to be a bit difficult. Based on information I found on a HUNLEY family tree, I was able to locate her in 1860,  living with someone other than her family, in Gibson County, Indiana,  and listed as age 12, and  a servant. Here are the census records from 1900 forward:

(click to enlarge):

In 1900, Anna and husband, Paul and her son, Charles were living on Franklin St, Oakland, CA. It lists Charles T Hunley as a step-son.

In 1910, Anna, Paul and Charles (listed as son) are living on Oak St., Oakland, CA. I am not sure why Charles is still listed as living with them. He married a woman by the name of Henrietta Drennon,  and had two daughters. He must have married about 1903/1904, because Florence Ann Hunley was born about 1904/1905 and Louise E. Hunley was born in 1907. Notice Louise’s name is on the gravestone with Anna and Paul Glud.

In 1920, Anna and Paul are still living on Oak St., Oakland, CA, but Charles Hunley is no longer listed as living with them.

*****

Paul C. Glud, 3764 Ruby street, Oakland, is retired after nearly 35 years of service as bridgetender at the pier and at the Ferry building.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Aug 7, 1927

In 1930, Anna had already passed away, but Paul is living on Ruby St. in Oakland, CA, and with him….another Hunley. This time it is a great-nephew (listed as great-uncle) named Arch Hunley, who, according to a family tree online, was the son of Ira, one of Anna’s nephews.

1894 County Directory

Anna is not listed with Paul in 1894,  but Charles T. Hunley is:

City Directory - 1894

So, it would seem Paul and Anna were probably married by that time. She was listed with Paul in 1895, also as matron of the Children’s Home as she is below in 1897:

City Directory - 1897

Anna’s son, Charles T. Hunley,  was a police officer in Oakland. He arrested lots of bad guys, per the news reports. (Prior to that, he was an electrician, and then a motorman for the A O & P E Ry Co.) I don’t know what happened to him; he was last registered to vote in 1922.  His wife was listed as a widow in 1930, worked as a seamstress, and  her daughter, Louise was still living with her. The older daughter, Florence, was shown living with a maternal aunt, Vina McDonald, and her occupation was listed as news writer for a newspaper.

*****

Now, as to my title of this post: Was Anna Glue really a drummer boy in the Civil War?

No doubt, she was a very interesting lady, who seemed to have been willing to try her hand at anything.

She did have four brothers, two of which there seems to be documentation  showing they served in the Civil War, on the side of the Union, so it is possible the other two were the ones who served on the Confederate side.

Regarding her father, Jeremiah, I did not find any proof he served, and it appears others have looked and have not found any either. According to a family tree for this family, Jeremiah may have been married six times! And he may have been married to two of them at the same time. (The family tree linked above is not the one on ancestry.com, but it has some of the information I used for reference.)

Another controversial issue with him is his date of death:

Widows Pension Records Mary E. Densmore
Detail:  Death Dates
Date:     1870 to 1871
Notes:     Thomas R. Hunley his son, told Mrs. Mary Murray who was married to Jeremiah Hunley that his father died in Dec 1863 then later told her April 1864 and that he died in prison. It was later voice in court proceedings that Thomas later said he died in 1870 or 1871, but was later reported to be alive.

From: Fletcher-Ammons, Hunley family tree on ancestry.com.

In her book linked above, Anna “Hundley” Glud states that her father knew he was dying, and told her to marry his old friend, Joe Dalton, who turned out to be a drunken wife beater who abused her. According to her story, she had a baby boy, (Charles Thomas Hunley?) and was so afraid for their lives, she took him and ran away. Eventually, she somehow ended up in California, but doesn’t say how she got there, or with whom she made the journey.

So, according to the news stories, Anna managed to hang on to her drum all these years. This is a red flag for me. She ran away from an abusive relationship, with child in arms, and still had her drum?

If she had been married, did she get a divorce before marrying Paul Glud? Did Joe Dalton die? How would she know if she ran away? I suppose that information might be found on her marriage license application for her marriage to Paul.

The accounts of her father, in her book and all the news articles don’t seem to jive with the few facts about him that are available. Clearly, he seemed to have been busy getting hitched and unhitched, while the children apparently were farmed out.  He doesn’t sound like the kind of man who “couldn’t bare to leave his little girl behind.”

In addition, the part of the story where she states that General Grant, once he heard the touching story, let her stay in, just seems too much like a romance to be true. Sure, it could have happened, but why did she wait until everyone involved was dead to tell the story? She seemed to be a lady who liked the attention the story would have brought her.

From the 1873 Memorial Day address (Fitchburg, MA) by General Devons:

That there are imposters and pretenders now, just as there were shirks and deserters during the war, cannot be denied…

The Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) May 31, 1873

My intent is not to disparage a good lady’s name. When I ran across the first article about her being a drummer boy, I was excited and had planned to add it to my post on drummer boys. So I started looking for more. After reading a few of the articles, I began to question the authenticity of her story. Obviously, she lived through the Civil War, and live was rough for her in her early years. She was very active in G.A.R. related groups, had brothers who fought in the war, and had access to all kinds of stories about the war. While her “war” story was interesting to read, I think it was just that, a story.

To Readers: Any additional information that might support her story would be welcome.

The Old Graveyard: Frederick, Maryland

January 30, 2010

THE OLD GRAVEYARD.

A Spot of Peculiar Historical Interest.

There is a great deal of historic interest attached to the old Presbyterian graveyard which has lately been purchased by the Salvation Army. In 1782 the first Presbyterian church ever built in this county was here erected. It was a very plain stucture of bricks, supposed to have been brought from England. It had a brick floor, high backed pews and a very lofty pulpit. The congregation was composed of Scotch settlers from Pennsylvania with a considerable German element; the first pastor was Rev. S.B. Balch, who was followed by Revs. David Baird and Cunningham Sample. Next came Rev. Samuel Knox from Ireland, a man of rare literary talents, who during his pastorate here was president of the Fred[er]ick Academy. He was the great grandfather of Rev. Wm. Ould, the present incumbent of the church. He was connected by marriage with the McCleery family of this city, who about two years ago removed the bodies of Mr. Knor [Knox?] and wife to Mt. Olivet cemetery. Rev. Patrick Davidson came next who was also president of the Frederick Academy, and it was during his pastorate that a new church was contemplated.

The present site was purchased about the year 1819, though the edifice was not commenced until 1825 and dedicated in 1827. To go back to the old churchyard with its fallen gravestones and sunken graves overrun with myrtle, we find that Rev. Mr. Davi[d]son was buried here in 1825. Among the sleeping dead were members of our prominent families whose sacred dust has just been carefully reinterred in Mt. Olivet. It has been told by an old resident, that Episcopalians and Presbyterians worshipped together in this old church, and their Sunday schools were united until the pastorate of Rev. Dr. Hamner.

Gov. Thomas Johnson (Image from http://www.knowledgerush.com)

One of the most historical events celebrated in this antique church occurred February 22nd, 1800, when Thomas Johnson, first Governor of Maryland, delivered a funeral oration in memory of George Washington.

George Washington (Image from http://shopyield.com)

Eight thousand persons were in attendance. It was one of those masterly orations which have been handed down to posterity. Gov. Johnson was a personal friend of Gen. Washington, and this oration was the last official act of his life. He said: “So strongly was Washington’s dear image imprinted on my memory, that I can now see the manly form and graceful attitude, his piercing blue eyes softened by modesty, innate sweetness and harmony of soul. Let us imitate his example, remember his patriotism, his courage on the field of battle and death, and like him to render up our swords to the country from which we receive them. We are professing Christians, let us live so that at death we may say like Washington, ‘I am not afraid to die.’”

The News (Frederick, Maryland) May 9, 1887

The Presbyterian Church image from: (Google Book LINK – limited preview) “Historical Sketch of the Presbyterian Church 1780-1910″ starts on page 448

Title   History of Frederick County, Maryland, Volume 1
Authors    Thomas John Chew Williams, Folger McKinsey
Edition    reprint
Publisher Genealogical Publishing Com, 1979
ISBN    0806379731, 9780806379739
Length    1724 pages

*****

More About Samuel Knox by Bernard C. Steiner in the Maryland Historical Magazine – vol.4; 1909 (Google Books LINK) pg. 276

A Huntingdon Co., PA Centenarian

December 18, 2009

NATIVE OF COUNTY 100 YEARS TODAY

Mrs. Beigle of Altoona Born Sept. 17, 1834, In Franklin Twp.

A native Huntingdon countian today became a centenarian.

Jane Elizabeth Beigle, the widow of Abram Irwin, a highly respected citizen of Bellwood, was born in Franklin township, Huntingdon county, September 17, 1834, and hence today is 100 years old. She is in excellent health and retains the use of all her faculties except that of sight which has been failing of late years. She is contented and happy and never tires of telling how good and kind God has been to her during all her life. She is a living exemplification of the promise to the godly.

Her parents were William and Margaret Beigle. She was married in 1884. Her husband died Sept. 6, 1920, and she now makes her home with her grandson, Avery Irvin, at Bellwood.

No special celebration marks the occasion today. The W.C.T.U. met with her this afternoon for a short service. Relatives and friends also called to extend felicitations.
She received her early education in the public schools of Huntingdon county and at Bucknell university, Lewisburg, where she was graduated in 1857.

A studious nature and a love for children especially fitted her for school teaching, so she began her life work in that profession at a little country school at Spruce Creek, where she spent several winter.

Then, a more difficult place at Warriors Mark awaited her where she taught the following five years. About this time, during the closing period of the Civil war, a great need had sprung up in the south for teachers to work among the freed Negroes, and she at once offered her services to the American Baptist mission board and was accepted and sent to Murfreesboro, Tenn.

After three years of hard work and endurance of the intense heat, she contracted yellow fever. This made it necessary for her to come home for a short period of rest and recuperation, but she again returned to her duties, this time being sent to Columbus, Ga., and later into Alabama. The entire amount of her teaching work in the south covered a period of twenty years.

Besides being a school teacher, she was an enthusiastic church and Sunday school worker, having a class in the church school as long as she was able to attend.

Baptized into membership of the Logan Valley Baptist church in Bellwood on April 10, 1853, by Rev. A.K. Bell, she has “kept the faith” for more than eighty years.

She is also an interested and devoted member of the Women’s Christian Temperance union, being the oldest member in Blair county, the organization which is today celebrating its fiftieth anniversary.

Daily News (Huntingdon, Pennsylvania) Sep 17, 1934

NATIVE OF COUNTY DIES AT AGE OF 101

Mrs. Jane E. Irwin, Bellwood, Oldest Alumna of Bucknell

Mrs. Jane Elizabeth Beigle Irwin, a native of Huntingdon county and one of the states oldest residents, passed away at the home of her grandson, Avery Irwin, in Bellwood, on Friday forenoon, December 27, at 11:10 o’clock. Mrs. Irwin observed her 101 st birthday anniversary on September 17, 1935…..

[The rest of the obituary repeated much of what is in the above article.]

Daily News (Huntingdon, Pennsylvania) Dec 28, 1935

About her husband, Abram Irwin and his family:

Twentieth Century History of Altoona and Blair County,
Pennsylvania, and Representative Citizens
Sell, Jesse C.Chicago, IL: Richmond-Arnold,
1911, pp. 559-561. [Posted on Ancestry.com]

ABRAM R. IRWIN, who has been a resident of Bellwood, Pa., since 1875, was for forty years engaged in farming in Blair County, Pa. He was born on what is now the Wentzell farm below Hensheystown, Pa., March 9, 1832, a son of Daniel and Catherine (Crain) Irwin, and is a direct descendant of one Jared Irwin, who came from Ireland about the time of the advent of William Penn. It is said that Jared Irwin bought the land of Penn, where Philadelphia now stands, and the family branched out to various parts of the country, many becoming prominent and useful citizens. Jared Irwin married into the royal Stuart family and had a family before coming to this country. One Jared Irwin became second governor of the state of Georgia, and the branch from which our subject’s family sprang, settled in the vicinity of York, Pa. The grandfather of our subject was named Jared, as also was his great grandfather. The name seems to occur in all branches of the family, indicating that the Irwins in all this country generally are descendants of this original Jared Irwin.

Jared Irwin, grandfather of our subject, lived in Huntingdon County, Pa.
Daniel Irwin, father of Abram R., was born in Huntingdon County, Pa.,
and was for some years located in the vicinity of Tyrone. About 1833 he
bought the farm now owned by the heirs of Frank Irwin, and resided in Gospel Hollow until the time of his death at the age of sixty-eight years. He was survived some years by his widow, who in maiden life was Catherine Crain.

Daniel and Catherine Crain reared the following children: Belinda, now deceased, who married Abram McCartney; Adie Crain Irwin, deceased: Evaline, deceased, who married Joseph Adlum; John, deceased; and Abram R., who is the only survivor.

Abram R. Irwin was reared on the homestead and attended the common
schools of the township. He began working on the farm at a very early age,
and was glad to be allowed twenty-five cents a year to attend the review in
Sinking Valley. He ultimately received a part of the home farm retiring in
1875, and moving to Bellwood, where he bought four or five lots on First Street and built a home. He then entered the employ of the Bell’s Gap
Railroad, and worked as rodman in laying out the roads from Lloydsville to
Coalport. He later ran on the road for some time as baggage master, being
with the company some ten or fifteen years. In 1881 Mr. Irwin bought a square of land and built his present home on the corner of Third and Martin streets. He also has three other houses and several lots left, and a son of his also owns six lots of this square.

On January 17, 1854, Mr. Irwin married Betanna S. Hileman, who was born
near Frankstown and died February 1, 1874. They had the following children:  Howard, born November 16, 1854, who lives in Depew, N.Y.; Isadora Blanche, born December 13, 1856, who is the widow of John Mingle and lives in Sinking Valley; Harry Hudson, born October 8, 1858, who lives on the home farm, in which his father still has an interest; Jessie Kate, born March 17, 1861, who married James Campbell, of Bellwood; George Brinton McClellan, born June 20, 1863, who lives in Gadsden, Alabama; Rose Leslie, born October 20, 1867, who is the wife of William Stafford and resides near Davenport, Iowa; Fred Bennett, born October 30, 1869, who lives near Davenport, Iowa; Hester Bell, born March 22, 1872, and now deceased, who was the wife of Clyde Greenland; Rebecca Hileman, born October 22, 1873, who married Harry Laird of Bellwood.

Mr. Irwin formed a second matrimonial union with Catherine Gwin, who is now deceased. On October 23, 1884 he was united in marriage with Jane Elizabeth Beigle, who was born September 17, 1835 in Franklin County, Pa. Mrs. Irwin is highly educated and was for about twenty years engaged in missionary work in Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama. She belongs to the Baptist church, Mr. Irwin being a member of the Presbyterian church.  The latter has charge of the Logan Valley Cemetery, serving as secretary.  he was for many years a Democrat but votes independently, voting for the man rather than for the party, and other things being equal, favoring prohibition candidates.


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